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7 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

It is a myth that I have heard many times over the years that in order to open a business as a foreigner, you had to employ Mexicans. I applied for a working temporary visa back in 2004 (the first resident visa I had), saying I wanted to open an upholstery business, and I was never asked if I was planning to employ Mexicans. In fact, I said it was a self-employed business for myself. 

I have never had any employees. 

I wonder if under the new regs, you can apply to change your visa to working status at INM in Mexico.

When I had my temporary, with permission to work, it was not a regular temporary- it cost about double. 

If I were you I would find a very good tax attorney and check and see if laws have changed. It is up to the business to make sure they are compliant. And if they changed the rules you may not be compliant.  And since right and left hand of govt don't talk they might not have noticed you are not compliant to the new laws.

This is one thing I have dealt with working corporate. Govt loves to change the rules and not tell you. And if you don't catch it they will screw you.

Just my advice better safe than sorry always the rule in my book

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38 minutes ago, Mexicoafterlife said:

I were you I would find a very good tax attorney and check and see if laws have changed

??? You, the newbie, are advising me to make sure I am compliant with the law here, and consult a tax lawyer? That's hilarious. I'm a permanent resident, have been for years, have never been retired, have every right to work here, am fully tax compliant, I file and pay business taxes monthly. 

You applied for permanente status as a retiree at a consulate. My situation is totally different from yours.

It is perfectly evident to the Mexican tax dept that I have no employees- if I did, I would have facturas and deductions for their salaries.

Go lecture to some other newbies, not people who've lived here and run businesses for 18 years.

 

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14 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

??? You, the newbie, are advising me to make sure I am compliant with the law here, and consult a tax lawyer? That's hilarious. I'm a permanent resident, have been for years, have never been retired, have every right to work here, am fully tax compliant, I file and pay business taxes monthly. 

You applied for permanente status as a retiree at a consulate. My situation is totally different from yours.

It is perfectly evident to the Mexican tax dept that I have no employees- if I did, I would have facturas and deductions for their salaries.

Go lecture to some other newbies, not people who've lived here and run businesses for 18 years.

 

I was giving my opinion of what I would do in your situation. 

Govt can change rules as they like and it's up to the business to stay compliant. Do as you wish no skin off of me. But to me it looks like things have changed and a quick check is never a bad idea.

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It's changed for new people applying not for those who have worked and paid taxes for years. That would be cutting off their nose to spite their face. 

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13 minutes ago, Ferret said:

It's changed for new people applying not for those who have worked and paid taxes for years. That would be cutting off their nose to spite their face. 

You think govt hasn't done that before? I'm just saying what I would do if I was in the situation of possible rule changes. No reason to not double check because if they didn't Grandfather the old rules people might have some legal issues to settle.

I have ran 100 million + budgets and with that all the govt rules that go with it. Lucky for me the corps I worked for had large groups of lawyers who's only job was to find new laws and make sure we were compliant.

Again no skin off my butt just saying what I would do to sleep better.

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1 hour ago, Mexicoafterlife said:

Again no skin off my butt just saying what I would do to sleep better.

I'm not having any trouble sleeping. And I'm not in any "situation of possible rule changes". I can assure you that the Mexican tax dept. lets taxpayers know when the rules have changed. There were many changes in the tax reporting system starting in January, and that information was readily available on the website. As they were, and which taxpayers were advised of, when they made changes back in 2008. 

In fact, it's so complicated now that I used to easily file my taxes myself, but  recently employed an accountant, who explained all of the tax changes this year, and would let me know of any further changes. There is no need for a "very good tax attorney". 

 

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BTW, my comment about opening a business and employing Mexicans was not about ALL businesses. I know of others who have provided computer services and worked on their own etc. etc. But, B&B's, Restaurants etc. do employ Mexicans. Even if you worked on your own, you were buying local parts and pieces that benefit other Mexican families. And what about all the artists who sell their work here? I guess that will come to a screeching halt for newbies as well?

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1 minute ago, Ferret said:

BTW, my comment about opening a business and employing Mexicans was not about ALL businesses. I know of others who have provided computer services and worked on their own etc. etc. But, B&B's, Restaurants etc. do employ Mexicans. Even if you worked on your own, you were buying local parts and pieces that benefit other Mexican families. And what about all the artists who sell their work here? I guess that will come to a screeching halt for newbies as well?

It will be quite a show for me and my wife. If we live to 88 we will be here for 40 years.  With these changes in 15 years things will look much different. 

I guess we will get to see the evolution of xpats in lake chapala.

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For sure things change. When I first came to this area in January of 1996, I thought I'd roll over and die of boredom. I was 45. Took a 12 hour bus trip to San Miguel de Allende and that was that. I rented an apartment to start May 1st and took the bus back to Ajijic. Flew home and informed my hubby of the decision and we packed up a van and drove down. My hubby only ever went back to Canada once after that. San Miguel was vibrant and alive with theatre, musical venues and fabulous restaurants. We lived there very happily for nine very interesting years.

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6 minutes ago, Ferret said:

For sure things change. When I first came to this area in January of 1996, I thought I'd roll over and die of boredom. I was 45. Took a 12 hour bus trip to San Miguel de Allende and that was that. I rented an apartment to start May 1st and took the bus back to Ajijic. Flew home and informed my hubby of the decision and we packed up a van and drove down. My hubby only ever went back to Canada once after that. San Miguel was vibrant and alive with theatre, musical venues and fabulous restaurants. We lived there very happily for nine very interesting years.

We looked at city as one of our picks.  Just seemed to HIP.  One traveling review said it was now the Disneyland of mexico. 

And we wanted a slower life. We have been so busy for so many years. My wife was tired of constantly moving for my work and not hardly seeing me because of work load. So the slow lake chapala life sounded great. And it has been.

We are almost done getting all of the basics we wanted to do. Then we can start to travel and see all there is to see in mexico knowing we will always be going back to our quite house with a great view at the end of each trip.

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1 hour ago, Ferret said:

San Miguel was vibrant and alive with theatre, musical venues and fabulous restaurants.

That's what I loved about it when I lived there. You could go out and hear live music of almost any genre any night of the week, there were art openings all the time at the many galleries where you could go hang out and shmooze around and drink and eat free wine and appies 🙂

And the jardin (the main plaza) was a hoppin' place all the time where you were sure to run into friends or make new ones.

I miss that kind of culture here on the coast. Surfing culture just isn't that interesting unless you're a surfer.

 

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2 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

That's what I loved about it when I lived there. You could go out and hear live music of almost any genre any night of the week, there were art openings all the time at the many galleries where you could go hang out and shmooze around and drink and eat free wine and appies 🙂

And the jardin (the main plaza) was a hoppin' place all the time where you were sure to run into friends or make new ones.

I miss that kind of culture here on the coast. Surfing culture just isn't that interesting unless you're a surfer.

 

How long ago has it been? From all the reviews now all I hear is the sidewalks are so crowded everyone can't fit but don't even get close to the streets unless you want to be ran over. 

We seriously looked there but sounded way to touristy now.

We might be young but we are ready to drop a few gears down and enjoy life at a slower pace. But for someone who likes the faster more crowded life style then it would probably be the right fit.

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21 minutes ago, Mexicoafterlife said:

How long ago has it been?

Long time, 20 years. Everywhere is different and more crowded now. And that's not just due to expats and foreign tourists- there seem to be more middle-class Mexicans now who are weekend tourists in their own country. Here where I live in Sayulita, the tourists used to just be foreigners, except for holidays like Semana Santa and Christmas. Now Guadalajarans and other city-dwelling Mexicans seem as prolific every weekend as the other tourists, and many own vacation homes here.

But even back then, I used to hear people saying that San Miguel was just overrun with retired expat Americans and Canadians, however, that wasn't my experience, not the crowd I hung out with. Like almost anywhere, one's experience can differ greatly depending on what area they live, who they hang with, and the activities they pursue.

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In general many Mexican towns and cities are too crowded for me.

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33 minutes ago, cedros said:

In general many Mexican towns and cities are too crowded for me.

I hear alot about crowding here.  But I just don't feel it. But I do live on the edge of town so when I go home its all quite and mostly empty.

I can imagine living in the center of ajijiic and never getting out of the crowds. Not really my thing. But to go I'm get stuff done and have some fun then to go back out to our quite area it's great.

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1 hour ago, mudgirl said:

Now Guadalajarans and other city-dwelling Mexicans seem as prolific

 

We've loved Sayulita, but it's tough to maintain quaintness after they set a Mexican "reality" show in your town. Still, if you don't like high-season hipster (EEP-stair?), don't go in high season. One thing with Sayulita is you can choose your own adventure, depending on when you go. Had a memorable stay in September 2017. Hot, though.

Is the waste-water Norovirus thing really solved now? I imagine it is, because there's too much at stake, but it absolutely destroyed ten days for us in 2019. Multiple bouts across a family of four that had flown in from three U.S. states.

That's over, right? Locals were very tight-lipped at the time.

LQ

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Lou Quillio said:

That's over, right? Locals were very tight-lipped at the time.

Yes, it seems to be under control now since they booted out the crook who had been running the water system and sewage treatmennt plant for 18 years. 

I know the system has been upgraded and a few years ago what I heard was that the plant was actually capable of doing tertiary treatment, but that that guy was only using primary treatment, which is basically raw sewage. He pocketed vast sums of money that were intended to be used to run the system.

And you are right- those who profited greatly from the tourist trade here tried to downplay or deny the seriousness of what was going on, which is unconscionable, IMO. But that wasn't really going to work, as we live in the age of social media, where, "We all got sick in Sayulita", posts all over travel review sites, and other social media is seen by millions of people.

To be fair, though, tourists getting sick here was always blamed on the sewage issue, when there are many reasons tourists get sick. You can get food poisoning, Norovirus, sunstroke, overdid it at the bar one night. In fact, Norovirus was only an issue during high tourist season- they didn't get it here, and locals weren't all getting Norovirus, the tourists brought it down with them. They were probably already infected when they got on the plane, even if they had no symptoms yet. Then they are all sharing a vacation home and spread it among themselves.

And there were many instances of a group of tourists all getting sick, but many in their group never went in the ocean at all. 

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6 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

Yes, it seems to be under control now since they booted out the crook who had been running the water system and sewage treatmennt plant for 18 years. 

I know the system has been upgraded and a few years ago what I heard was that the plant was actually capable of doing tertiary treatment, but that that guy was only using primary treatment, which is basically raw sewage. He pocketed vast sums of money that were intended to be used to run the system.

And you are right- those who profited greatly from the tourist trade here tried to downplay or deny the seriousness of what was going on, which is unconscionable, IMO. But that wasn't really going to work, as we live in the age of social media, where, "We all got sick in Sayulita", posts all over travel review sites, and other social media is seen by millions of people.

To be fair, though, tourists getting sick here was always blamed on the sewage issue, when there are many reasons tourists get sick. You can get food poisoning, Norovirus, sunstroke, overdid it at the bar one night. In fact, Norovirus was only an issue during high tourist season- they didn't get it here, and locals weren't all getting Norovirus, the tourists brought it down with them. They were probably already infected when they got on the plane, even if they had no symptoms yet. Then they are all sharing a vacation home and spread it among themselves.

And there were many instances of a group of tourists all getting sick, but many in their group never went in the ocean at all. 

It does seem like the American govt likes to make people scared to come to mexico.  Always making it sound bad.  When it's nicer down here than in the USA from what I have seen and ran into.

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4 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

what I heard was that the plant was actually capable of doing tertiary treatment, but that that guy was only using primary treatment, which is basically raw sewage.

You could see local kids playing in the muck of the spillway (the mighty Rio Sayulita) from the bridge on Revolución. Terrible.

Just for the record, Norovirus ain't bacteria. If it wants you it'll get you. Nothing to do about it, no precautions to take, your ### is just kicked. Hard. Maybe three days. And you don't acquire resistance, so don't be surprised by Round 2.

I think it's correct that high season was the danger zone -- but that's not the Sayulita we like, anyway, so I think we'll go back eventually.

LQ

 

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37 minutes ago, Lou Quillio said:

You could see local kids playing in the muck of the spillway (the mighty Rio Sayulita) from the bridge on Revolución. Terrible.

Yes, and there is also a creek, just past Don Pedro's restaurant, that we locals all called the Rio Hepatiti. They cleaned that up, too. Discovered some homes whose sewer pipes were discharging directly into it.

BTW, that isn't a river in Sayulita, although everyone seems to refer to it as such- it's an arroyo- it's seasonal- only has water in it part of the year. Dry as a bone right now, even where I live, a couple kilometers up it, where we usually still have a small stream flowing for longer than you see in town.

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I do not know if this will be of help but worth a try... SAT launches facility to request your Proof of Tax Situation with Tax Identification Card | Tax Administration Service | | Government gob.mx (www.gob.mx)

I use Microsoft Edge as my browser and it automatically translates from Spanish to English for me.

This service MAY only be for actual taxpayers. I dunno.

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21 minutes ago, sunshineydays said:

What information and documentation do you need to furnish to obtain the constancia?

If you have an account at SAT and can successfully log in at sat.gob.mx, select otros tramites then Genera Constancia in the basic services menu. Select the 1st option Inscripcion and then scroll to the right to uncover the Generar Constancia button. It will download a 2 page pdf.

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