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Well I understand why the govt is getting this way with residents.  My first house I rented here was owned by a american.  Both her Gardner and her thought that our walled in yard was ok to be trespassed on anytime.  We would be in our house or in the pool and next thing they come walking thru.  So we went to our lawyer here and found out our lease wasn't legal. 

1 not on English and Spanish 

2. She had no tax number!

My lawyer let us know that thus is super common in the lake chapala area. X pats rent out properties and don't pay the rental tax. And from what I was told is 35%! Well she has been renting that property for over 20 years, straight from her mouth.

If I was the govt and had this many problems I would tighten down fast too.

Best part with her is my lawyer gave her a chance to solve the problem out of court. She said she would never settle. Now she is going to court where she will be exposed for tax evasion. Lol over 20 years of renters taxes she will have to pay plus interest and penalties. And she isn't a citizen stayed a full time resident so she could lose her visa too.

So I understand why the govt is doing this alot of xpats are cheating the system 

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Just so you know the Mexican government is well aware of taxes not being paid on rentals. They pick an area where expats live and clean house every once in a while. I know they've swept San Miguel de Allende and also PV in the past. Playing with the Mexican government by not reporting income from rentals is like playing with fire. If you get caught, there a big penalties in addition to what you owe.

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8 minutes ago, Ferret said:

Just so you know the Mexican government is well aware of taxes not being paid on rentals. They pick an area where expats live and clean house every once in a while. I know they've swept San Miguel de Allende and also PV in the past. Playing with the Mexican government by not reporting income from rentals is like playing with fire. If you get caught, there a big penalties in addition to what you owe.

Glad to hear that. She is going to be in court later this year admitting to doing it for the last 20 years plus. Just wish I knew spanish better so I could understand at real time as the judge rips here up. The 7 grand settlement would have been much cheaper than the 20+ years of unpaid taxes, fines and interest. But hey it's her money. Lol

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Many Mexicans do not report the income either  so the government has lots of work to do before everyone reports income. They are giving tax breaks to people who do it so there is more and more pressure to get facturas and report income but it is a tough road, I  think this move is just another one to tighten up the system.

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I just wonder. To those who are on retirement visa. I had to write and sign a letter stating that I would not earn any income when I lived in mexico. So is that a new thing? And if not how are these retires xpats renting out properties if they signed a letter saying they would not make money while retired in mexico?

 

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I never heard of anyone who applied for permanente status having to sign such a letter. Perhaps there is some new rule if you apply as "retired", but if the landlady has been here for 20 years, she was likely not retired anyway when she got her residency.

And I also never heard of a "retirement visa"- only temporal or permanente resident status.

One of the perks of having permanente is that you can work in Mexico, you don't need special permission, although you do need to inform INM of any lucrative activities. 

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4 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

I never heard of anyone who applied for permanente status having to sign such a letter. Perhaps there is some new rule if you apply as "retired", but if the landlady has been here for 20 years, she was likely not retired anyway when she got her residency.

And I also never heard of a "retirement visa"- only temporal or permanente resident status.

One of the perks of having permanente is that you can work in Mexico, you don't need special permission, although you do need to inform INM of any lucrative activities. 

Yeah things have changed. They have a retirement visa now. And they make you write and sign a letter stating you will not work to gain income in mexico. The Denver consulate has the whole process on it. I did the usa side of our paperwork.  There is no plain full time visa. It's work, family, education or retirement. Each has its own requirements now.

Probably doing it now since they have had so many problems with xpats and not paying taxes. And I could see how they would like locals to make the working money not some xpat who shouldn't need it.

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A "retirement visa" is new to me too. As far as I know, there are only two... temporal or permanente. I suspect that the Denver Mexican Consulate is not abiding by the rules. Which is no surprise since different consulates have different monetary requirements. I got my Inmigrado status back in 2012. You'd be surprised how many authorities IN Mexico have no idea that the name "Inmigrado" is the same as Permanente. Just the name on the card has changed.

 

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Well we are permanente residents but we applied even on the paperwork was a box retired, work, school, family (something to the fact your moving to mexico to live with family).

Denver was the closest to where we lived so I didn't even check other consulates. Another xpat board lucky for me had a guy who just did it in Denver and gave me a email address that got me a instant appointment compared to the weeks of waiting they the online system. This was during covid too.

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It sounds odd- I can see part of the application process having to state why you want to move to Mexico, but that one can't work?  If I were you, I would go to INM here and check whether the conditions of your permanente status are different from any other permanente status. That is, if you care. 

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I don't really care. No need to work to make money so didn't matter to us about the letter. Let me go to the Denver consulate site and find the page we used last year.

After years of working 60 and 70 hour weeks nor working sounded like a great plan.

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https://consulmex.sre.gob.mx/denver/index.php/non-mexicans/visas

Permanent Resident Visa

  • Who needs this visa?

Foreign retirees or pensioners who wish to reside in Mexico under permanent residency conditions (more than 4 years).

  1. One (1) letter addressed to the Consulate requesting permanent residency in Mexico indicating city/town where you are planning to live, address in Mexico and travel date. The letter must state that you are aware that as a holder of this kind of visa you are not allowed to work in Mexico.
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6 minutes ago, ibarra said:

No one is disputing that a Permanente Visa is available.   You said you had a "retirement " visa".   

Go read the entire page.  The parts i copy and pasted are from the only tab for permant visas.  In the Denver office the only way to get a perm visa is retiree or pensioner. 

See the "Who needs this visa" part. The only option it gives for perm visa is retirees.  All others are under the part time visa holders. Now this is the Denver office and I remember being told each office is differnt.  Yeah weird but what I was told.  So in Denver the only perm visa is a retiree visa all others are temp visas.  And you have to write the letter saying you will not work or make income in mexico.

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Ummm, I just read the whole link that you posted Mexicoafterlife. I do not see anywhere on the application what you quoted in your post.

From the link (tipo de visa (marca con una X)):...you should have checked Residencia permanente...

image.png.71ec4ad187293aad3354599c7d25e12b.png

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1 hour ago, Ferret said:

Ummm, I just read the whole link that you posted Mexicoafterlife. I do not see anywhere on the application what you quoted in your post.

From the link (tipo de visa (marca con una X)):...you should have checked Residencia permanente...

image.png.71ec4ad187293aad3354599c7d25e12b.png

Scroll down and click on the g tab permanent resident. And all is there

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11 minutes ago, Mexicoafterlife said:

Tab G and you see it all.

It does not say that a permanente visa is only for retirees who won't work in Mexico. The heading is "Who needs this visa". That means if you apply as a retiree, you need a permanente visa and it appears that you have to say you won't work here. 

So maybe that is the only way you can get permanente status through a consulate now, but if you had applied for temporal status, and then switched after the required years on that visa to permanente, from within Mexico, you would have a normal permanente visa that you could certainly have lucrative activities under.

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12 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

It does not say that a permanente visa is only for retirees who won't work in Mexico. The heading is "Who needs this visa". That means if you apply as a retiree, you need a permanente visa and it appears that you have to say you won't work here. 

So maybe that is the only way you can get permanente status through a consulate now, but if you had applied for temporal status, and then switched after the required years on that visa to permanente, from within Mexico, you would have a normal permanente visa that you could certainly have lucrative activities under.

Yes but like I said to start perm like we did that was the only choice. No way I was going to go thru immigration every year for 4 years to get perm. Just didn't like that idea. 

I only know what the rules are now. And under G tab they say retirees and pensioners. And they also say sign a letter where you can't work.  I was just asking if that was always that way back in the day.

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35 minutes ago, Mexicoafterlife said:

No way I was going to go thru immigration every year for 4 years to get perm

You don't, actually. I think you have to renew after one year, but then you can renew for the full 3 years after that. 

I've been here for 18 years, startingbout with temporary for about 10 years, which yes, had to be renewed yearly back then. And then segued into permanente, for which I had to provide no financials. And I've worked under both those visas, legally, all those years. 

Things have definitely changed- it used to be a lot easier.

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In both the temporary AND the permanente visa choices, it states that you will not work in Mexico. This is very new and will limit a lot of people from applying. Gone are the days when you were able to open a business and employ Mexicans. Not sure if that is good or bad.

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45 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

You don't, actually. I think you have to renew after one year, but then you can renew for the full 3 years after that. 

I've been here for 18 years, startingbout with temporary for about 10 years, which yes, had to be renewed yearly back then. And then segued into permanente, for which I had to provide no financials. And I've worked under both those visas, legally, all those years. 

Things have definitely changed- it used to be a lot easier.

I used Alvaro for this side. And we made friends with a guy who was temp. He was told by Alvaro that it was 1 to.e a year for 4 years and it had to be the same week or you were done. So things have massively changed.

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54 minutes ago, Ferret said:

This is very new and will limit a lot of people from applying. Gone are the days when you were able to open a business and employ Mexicans.

It is a myth that I have heard many times over the years that in order to open a business as a foreigner, you had to employ Mexicans. I applied for a working temporary visa back in 2004 (the first resident visa I had), saying I wanted to open an upholstery business, and I was never asked if I was planning to employ Mexicans. In fact, I said it was a self-employed business for myself. 

I have never had any employees. 

I wonder if under the new regs, you can apply to change your visa to working status at INM in Mexico.

When I had my temporary, with permission to work, it was not a regular temporary- it cost about double. 

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