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3 minutes ago, bmh said:

WHy dont you read her whole post. and understand what she says rather than reacting to the first part of the post.

YOU read it!!! Here it is:

"Your neurologist is confused or wrong.  A law passed in Mexico several years ago disallowed ANY generic to be different than the original brand name drug.  Don't expect drs to know everything.  I used to work at the U of Oregon Medical School and drs were forever telling patients what was covered by their insurance or Medicare when the doctor either had outdated info or was just plain wrong."

Again: Where did she say anything regarding US law??? Don't mess with me since I only deal in FACTS!!!

Just to be clear here is how YOU responded to her very logical post:

"yo1 whatever is allowed in the US has nothing to do with what is allowed in Mexico, each country has its own rule , and you just cannot generalized. Just because Mexico passed a law, does not mean they arew following it either.. We all know that money talks so who knows.."

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There are lots of laws in Mexico and lots of them are ignored. 

I would suggest that anyone having to take a medication for a new ailment start out with the brand name prescribed by their Doctor. When said ailment is under control, THEN, if the Doctor agrees, you can start with a generic and see what happens. Only change one thing at any given time over the course of a month. If everything's okay, then you can change another med.

Every single one of us is different and metabolizes medicine(s) differently. I, personally, tried a couple of generics for Micardis Plus 80/12,5  It did NOT go well. YMMV.  My hubby had no problems shifting to generics over the course of six months, one at a time.  Be smart, be thrifty but be safe as well.

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9 minutes ago, Ferret said:

There are lots of laws in Mexico and lots of them are ignored. 

I would suggest that anyone having to take a medication for a new ailment start out with the brand name prescribed by their Doctor. When said ailment is under control, THEN, if the Doctor agrees, you can start with a generic and see what happens. Only change one thing at any given time over the course of a month. If everything's okay, then you can change another med.

Every single one of us is different and metabolizes medicine(s) differently. I, personally, tried a couple of generics for Micardis Plus 80/12,5  It did NOT go well. YMMV.  My hubby had no problems shifting to generics over the course of six months, one at a time.  Be smart, be thrifty but be safe as well.

I always have used branded RX. I suspect doctors who prescribe generics and if I don't feel strongly enough to dump them, I tell them DON'T EVER prescribe a generic or similar for me. Why put yourself in jeopardy for chump change or even a few more pesos.

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2 hours ago, gringohombre said:

Do you think that a medical chain with over 200 locations would jeopardize their exitance in this manner???  

Perhaps they have no reason to believe they would be jeopardizing their existence. You've been in Mexico long enough to know that greasing palms is standard practice to skirt the laws.

And you don't look things up before making statements, do you? Where did you pull "over 200 locations" from? Technically, you are correct- it is "over 200". They have over 6,000 locations. 

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53 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

Perhaps they have no reason to believe they would be jeopardizing their existence. You've been in Mexico long enough to know that greasing palms is standard practice to skirt the laws.

And you don't look things up before making statements, do you? Where did you pull "over 200 locations" from? Technically, you are correct- it is "over 200". They have over 6,000 locations. 

Now, doesn't this make my argument all that much better? In fact you are right...I found a 2019 article announcing that Farmacias Similares was ADDING 300 locations to thier existing 6,400. My initial research was flawed in some way. However with medicine and drug laws being the most strictly enforced in most countries, I strongly doubt that a company this big would jeopardize the success they already have by "greasing palms". You can see a more detailed explanation of my views on this in my next post below.

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This discussion of original vs. generic drugs is a non sequitur at best…they are the SAME!!

Sn. Google: Are generic name drugs less effective? No. Generic medications are just as effective as brand-name drugs. According to the FDA, drug makers must prove that generic medications can be substituted for brand-name drugs and offer the same benefits as their brand-name counterparts.

Now before I hear all the screaming; “you are quoting US law!” let me remind you what Yo1 said in a recent post here; “A law passed in Mexico several years ago disallowed ANY generic to be different than the original brand name drug.” As for counterfeit drugs…it is just as easy to counterfeit original drugs as it is a generic!!!

So, you are free to spend your money as you want, but I much prefer saving 60% - 80% on my meds…and I remain a very healthy guy…for my age!!!

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https://qroo.us/2021/10/03/can-you-trust-the-generic-drugs-in-mexico-video/ 

Can You Trust the Generic Drugs in Mexico? (VIDEO)

Posted By: Qroo Paul October 3, 2021

Video Transcript

Hey everybody. Qroo Paul here. Welcome to the channel. A few years ago when I was a blogger, I wrote an article about how Linda and I save money by going to a popular pharmacy chain in Mexico called farmacias similares on Mondays because everything is 25% off. They have a large line of generic drugs there.

Almost immediately, readers started posting comments with warnings that the products sold by Farmacias Similares were inferior and that the strength of the medications were lower. One reader said that’s why they use the word “similar” or similar in the name. Well, the negative comments prompted me to temporarily pull the article while I investigated the matter further.

After some extensive research, I learned that there was some validity to their concerns — at least prior to 2010. That year, everything changed.

Prior to 2010 there were actually three classifications of drugs: de patente – patent or name brand version; 2) generíco intercambiable – generic but tested to be 100% interchangeable with the name brand version; and 3) similares -drug containing the same ingredients as the patent version but lacking the testing for bioequivalence.

Many of the drugs sold by the pharmaceutical chain Farmacias Similares prior to the change fell into the third category. That’s the primary reason why some people were critical of the quality of their products.

In 2004, there was a significant reform to the health law (Ley General de Salud) requiring all of the medications sold in Mexico to pass rigorous testing for bioequivalence beginning in 2010. In layman’s terms, they were eliminating the third category. This was great news for the consumer and it greatly increased people’s trust in generic medications.

To comply with the new law, Farmacias Similares conducted testing on all of their medications at a cost of between $50,000 – $90,000 USD each. The generic medications that the chain now sells have been tested and approved for quality, dosage and bioequivalence.

The government agency that oversees the medication registry and maintains compliance is the Comisíon Federal para la Protección Contra Riesgos Sanitarios (COFEPRIS). I contacted them directly to confirm all of this information that I am telling you now.

I spoke with a very friendly and helpful representative who confirmed that all of the generic medications sold in Mexico have been thoroughly tested to ensure that they are the equivalent of the name brand version.

She added that it doesn’t matter if I buy the generic made by Farmacias Similares, Farmacias del Ahorro or ay other pharmacy chain, it’s going to be the same in terms of ingredients and effectiveness. She said that the only difference will be in appearance (i.e. color, shape and packaging).

I commend Mexico for creating both the legislation and the governmental infrastructure necessary to ensure that people can trust the generic drugs sold in Mexico. In doing so, they’ve found a way to reduce the cost of health care for their citizens, as well as any expats who call this home.

If you have any additional questions about medications sold in Mexico, you should contact COFEPRIS.

I hope you enjoyed the video, until next time. hasta luego.

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3 minutes ago, InChapala1 said:

https://qroo.us/2021/10/03/can-you-trust-the-generic-drugs-in-mexico-video/ 

 

 

Can You Trust the Generic Drugs in Mexico? (VIDEO)

Posted By: Qroo Paul October 3, 2021

Video Transcript

Hey everybody. Qroo Paul here. Welcome to the channel. A few years ago when I was a blogger, I wrote an article about how Linda and I save money by going to a popular pharmacy chain in Mexico called farmacias similares on Mondays because everything is 25% off. They have a large line of generic drugs there.

Almost immediately, readers started posting comments with warnings that the products sold by Farmacias Similares were inferior and that the strength of the medications were lower. One reader said that’s why they use the word “similar” or similar in the name. Well, the negative comments prompted me to temporarily pull the article while I investigated the matter further.

After some extensive research, I learned that there was some validity to their concerns — at least prior to 2010. That year, everything changed.

Prior to 2010 there were actually three classifications of drugs: de patente – patent or name brand version; 2) generíco intercambiable – generic but tested to be 100% interchangeable with the name brand version; and 3) similares -drug containing the same ingredients as the patent version but lacking the testing for bioequivalence.

Many of the drugs sold by the pharmaceutical chain Farmacias Similares prior to the change fell into the third category. That’s the primary reason why some people were critical of the quality of their products.

In 2004, there was a significant reform to the health law (Ley General de Salud) requiring all of the medications sold in Mexico to pass rigorous testing for bioequivalence beginning in 2010. In layman’s terms, they were eliminating the third category. This was great news for the consumer and it greatly increased people’s trust in generic medications.

To comply with the new law, Farmacias Similares conducted testing on all of their medications at a cost of between $50,000 – $90,000 USD each. The generic medications that the chain now sells have been tested and approved for quality, dosage and bioequivalence.

The government agency that oversees the medication registry and maintains compliance is the Comisíon Federal para la Protección Contra Riesgos Sanitarios (COFEPRIS). I contacted them directly to confirm all of this information that I am telling you now.

I spoke with a very friendly and helpful representative who confirmed that all of the generic medications sold in Mexico have been thoroughly tested to ensure that they are the equivalent of the name brand version.

She added that it doesn’t matter if I buy the generic made by Farmacias Similares, Farmacias del Ahorro or ay other pharmacy chain, it’s going to be the same in terms of ingredients and effectiveness. She said that the only difference will be in appearance (i.e. color, shape and packaging).

I commend Mexico for creating both the legislation and the governmental infrastructure necessary to ensure that people can trust the generic drugs sold in Mexico. In doing so, they’ve found a way to reduce the cost of health care for their citizens, as well as any expats who call this home.

If you have any additional questions about medications sold in Mexico, you should contact COFEPRIS.

I hope you enjoyed the video, until next time. hasta luego.

See...told ya so...Ja, Ja, Ja!!!!!!!!!!!

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Ferret the same thing happened to my husband with Micardis and generics.. We try the brand drug then we switch the to generic while monitering the changes if there are any, and ther was a difference in this case so we went back to the brand.  On some other drugs I buy generics.. but never similar..

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20 minutes ago, bmh said:

Ferret the same thing happened to my husband with Micardis and generics.. We try the brand drug then we switch the to generic while monitering the changes if there are any, and ther was a difference in this case so we went back to the brand.  On some other drugs I buy generics.. but never similar..

Sorry about the problem with your husband. I would suggest that his problem was not due to the generic but a natural occurrence. As far as I can tell by all the evidence I have seen and information here on this board, If you are buying a legal generic drug from a reputable pharmacy there will be no problems...they are the SAME...MISMO!!! As far as "On some other drugs I buy generics.. but never similar.."  I am not understanding that since there is no such name of a drug (similar)...it is either the original brand or a generic...both the same!!!

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7 hours ago, gringohombre said:

but I much prefer saving 60% - 80% on my meds…and I remain a very healthy guy…for my age!!!

Very healthy people don't need meds. 🙂

And I can assure you that all generics do not work like the patent medicine. I used to take valium occasionally when I was going through a stressful time and had a hard time sleeping due to anxiety. 

Actual Valium calmed the anxiety, I'd be asleep in 15 minutes, and I would sleep well all night. I tried the generic diazapam, and an hour later I was still awake and anxious. Same exact thing happened to a friend of mine with the same drug. 

Even if the main drug is the same, they are buffered with different ingredients (no, they are not "exactly the same") , which affect how well they work.

 

 

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17 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

Very healthy people don't need meds. 🙂

And I can assure you that all generics do not work like the patent medicine. I used to take valium occasionally when I was going through a stressful time and had a hard time sleeping due to anxiety. 

Actual Valium calmed the anxiety, I'd be asleep in 15 minutes, and I would sleep well all night. I tried the generic diazapam, and an hour later I was still awake and anxious. Same exact thing happened to a friend of mine with the same drug. 

Even if the main drug is the same, they are buffered with different ingredients (no, they are not "exactly the same") , which affect how well they work.

 

 

?

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21 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

Very healthy people don't need meds. 🙂

And I can assure you that all generics do not work like the patent medicine. I used to take valium occasionally when I was going through a stressful time and had a hard time sleeping due to anxiety. 

Actual Valium calmed the anxiety, I'd be asleep in 15 minutes, and I would sleep well all night. I tried the generic diazapam, and an hour later I was still awake and anxious. Same exact thing happened to a friend of mine with the same drug. 

Even if the main drug is the same, they are buffered with different ingredients (no, they are not "exactly the same") , which affect how well they work.

 

 

I am getting tired of correcting you. Again, Sn. Google: Diazepam oral tablet is available as both a generic and a brand-name drug. Brand name: ValiumThey are both the SAME!!! Maybe you are taking them in different dosages or there are different conditions existing when you are taking them. I am going to have to start billing you for these lessons...

And as for; "veryhealthy people don't need meds", I happen to take low doses of 2 very safe and effective generics; 5mg. of Amlodipino for slightly elevated blood pressure and 10mg. of Pravastatina for slightly high cholesterol. These are PREVENTATIVE drugs that KEEP me very healthy...so there!!!  

 
 
 
 
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Generics are NOT exactly the same. They have the same ACTIVE ingredients.

What's the Difference Between a Brand-Name Drug and a Generic Name Drug? - GoodRx

Quote

 

Are there times when I should choose a brand-name drug over a generic name?

A generic drug may sound like an obvious choice when it comes to deciding which version of a medication to take—after all, it’s cheaper and does the exact same thing. 

But there are some cases where you should stay on a brand-name medication or use it over a generic one:

  • When there’s no generic version available. Some medications, like Premarin (which is used to treat hot flashes and prevent osteoporosis), don’t have a generic version available. And there may never be a generic for it because we don’t know what’s in it. Even if a brand doesn’t have a generic, talk to your doctor if you can’t afford your medication. They may recommend programs to help you save or prescribe you a cheaper alternative.

  • When you take a narrow therapeutic index drug. These are drugs where small differences in the dose or blood concentration of the medication can lead to serious reactions. One study found that patients who switched from brand to generic antiepileptic drugs had more side effects and increased costs from physician visits. Other drugs in this category include blood thinners, lithium, and thyroid medications. With these types of medications, if your doctor initially prescribes you the brand, you’ll want to stick to the brand. And if they prescribe you the generic, you’ll want to stick to the generic. Switching between versions can be risky.

  • When you don’t do as well on the generic. Very rarely, people respond poorly when they switch to a generic. For example, they may absorb it differently due to how the tablet is made. The same study above found that a small number of people’s symptoms got worse after they switched from Celexa, a drug used to treat depression, to citalopram, the generic version. Check with your doctor if you suspect any side effects after switching to a generic.

 

Quote

 

But here's the catch: "They're not necessarily identical to the brand-name medication," Cooperman says. That's one of the things you'll need to consider when deciding whether to buy a generic or brand name... The generic has to have the same active ingredients and in the same amount as the original. But the other ingredients in the pill, such as fillers, can be different. And that can affect how quickly the medication gets absorbed by your body, Cooperman explains...For some medicines though, small changes have a big impact in how your body responds and how well the drug works. What matters isn't necessarily the dose of the medication, but how much of it your body can use, Meigs says. With some conditions, a slight difference can have serious consequences...

Seizure medications are one example, he says. You can be taking the drug correctly, but your body may not get enough of it. And if the level of the drug in your blood goes too low, you could have a seizure.

"Patients who do well on one generic may not do as well on another generic," Cooperman says. "And the same goes for the brand-name medication vs. the generic."

Several different companies may make the same generic drug, too, but they might use different filler ingredients. So their medications could have slightly different rates of absorption or cause different side effects.

If you're happy with how a generic drug works for you, find out who the manufacturer is. Depending on the state you live in, this information might be on the prescription bottle. If it's not, ask your pharmacist to check. Then request that version every time you get your prescription filled.

 

 

 

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22 hours ago, gringohombre said:

Similares Pharmacy is the  NAME of the chain (a play on words). If you have a prescription and the patent on the drug has expired you can buy a generic (the exact same drug) at Similares Pharmacy of any other pharmacy (if they carry it). You are very confused!!!  

Decades ago Similares sold drugs that were mislabeled, contained contaminates, were below name brand doises etc. and got caught many times. They cannot get away with it anymore. Because of their past fraud I feel compeled to not do business with the chain. They screwed over many customers and do not deserve my business.

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51 minutes ago, AlanMexicali said:

Decades ago Similares sold drugs that were mislabeled, contained contaminates, were below name brand doises etc. and got caught many times. They cannot get away with it anymore. Because of their past fraud I feel compeled to not do business with the chain. They screwed over many customers and do not deserve my business.

The past is the past...lets move on!!!

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12 hours ago, gringohombre said:

Diazepam oral tablet is available as both a generic and a brand-name drug. Brand name: ValiumThey are both the SAME!!!

Why are you telling me that diazepam is available as both generic and brand name and what the brand name is? You might have had to Google it, but I certainly don't- I have been well aware of that for years.

And yelling that generics are exactly the same as the originals doesn't make you correct. But as usual, you seem to think that endlessly repeating a falsehood, and pointedly ignoring the facts others present, somehow makes it true. 

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brooklyn bridge for sale,p.t. barnum,etc. is fitting for this debate by laypersons on this board espousing the ridiculous notion that branded drugs have perfect equivalents in generics. You can count on one hand those of us on here with any real medical training not googling all sorts of sources, and fortunately some others who possess common sense, who call your blatherings,total BS. Here is something for you to ponder when a new drug  formula is tested with a quadruple blind study: the efficacy of the new is generally close to the older version,the placibo is in the 50 +/- range and about 10% of those that are told that they can't be helped,recover. The mind is a powerful medicine-ain't it?-SNORK!

Let me leave you with this question: why is it that a simple formula ,Coca Cola, has NEVER been replicated-eh!?

 

pedro kertesz

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52 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

Why are you telling me that diazepam is available as both generic and brand name and what the brand name is? You might have had to Google it, but I certainly don't- I have been well aware of that for years.

And yelling that generics are exactly the same as the originals doesn't make you correct. But as usual, you seem to think that endlessly repeating a falsehood, and pointedly ignoring the facts others present, somehow makes it true. 

Valium IS diazepam...diazepam IS Valium!!! Get over it and maybe it's time to take your meds!!!

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