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Electric Bill Doubled


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With the cost of oil going up, I expected the CFE bill to be more, but was surprised that it was double and usage amount almost the same. Anyone else?

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My bill has always been between 250 and 350. Not even close to DAC. Usage still the same on the bill as previous months. Only this month cost bumped up to 650 for no reason.

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43 minutes ago, Yo1 said:

Take a photo of your current meter reading and your newest bill to CFE, to provide proof of overcharge and ask them to adjust your bill.

Do this prior to paying the bill, since once it's paid the response will be "too bad". I learned that lesson from CFE.

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3 hours ago, sunnyvmx said:

With the cost of oil going up, I expected the CFE bill to be more, but was surprised that it was double and usage amount almost the same. Anyone else?

DAC level is averaging >500 kWh per more, in most recent 6 billing periods.       DAC charges the entire amount of kWh at 6+ pesos per, whereas tarifa 01 is charged at the stepped rate levels.     Since you mention use/ consumption has not really changed, this is almost certainly the reason......

Feel free to email or PM.

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2 hours ago, sm1mex said:

We put in Solar years ago. Already paid for itself. Electric bill 51 pesos every 2 months. Can use what ever power we need. We recommend Opiere. Excellent service. 

Same here, sm1mex. In fact I put in two panels more than needed. And Go Solar, Opiere, +,+ all have given great service.

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1 hour ago, Mainecoons said:

cloudy weather, like today,

The ajijicweather.com site, especially the original page, has a great UV index that is almost a perfect proxy for tracking potential solar production.   A  nice bell curve is a great typical sunny day  (left side from yesterday) while the jittery right side is today's cloudy weather.      

vws752.jpg

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Highly recommend Opiere. We had panels put in when our electric bill went nuts. They have VERY quickly paid for themselves because we were in DAC and the bills were crazy. Now, we give a bit back to CFE and don't mind a bit as our bills are $51mxn each billing cycle. We're doing everything we can to go as all-electric as possible since gas is getting crazy, too. If it means installing two more panels (we have 20), we will. We like being able to use all of our electronics without worry and we recently added extra security lighting outside. We have to use a bit of gas for our dryer (it was supposed to be electric) and our backup generator, but once the solar water heater is installed on Tuesday, that should also drop quite a bit.  If necessary, we'll also convert the kitchen appliances to electric (a bit of a pain trying to find an electric stove). If you can, go solar.

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Our CFE bills run between 300 and 500 pesos for two months.  That's 7.50 and 12.50 dollars per month.  Not worth it for us to go solar.  I don't think a single unexplained jump of 300 pesos that Sunnyvmex experienced is enough to justify spending money for solar panels for now.  Just try to have it explained and wait and see what happens on the next billing cycle.  If you decide to sell a home then much of what you invested in solar is probably going to come back to you.  If you're not planning to sell then I'm not sure how big the bills would have to be  for the investment in solar to finally pay off.

Alan

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I agree with barrbower, I'd investigate for errors first. Our electric bill is only about $240 MX every two months but have seen mention of 🌞 Solar Water Heaters on this site before. I admit I don't know much about them.

Are they efficient and affordable?

Are they practical for two adults to use as a way to get your propane consumption/cost down?

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Solar hot water heating is probably the best investment given the cost of propane. I would guess the payback is well less than two years.

We put in 22 panels @ 240 watts ten years ago along with solar hot water. We then gradually switched out all our gas appliances (except the BBQ and pizza oven) for electric.

My Northern friends are in disbelief when I tell them I spend 25 pesos a month for electricity (with a pool and landscape lighting) and 2,000 pesos annually for propane and it will only get better with AMLO at the helm.

SunFan

 

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6 hours ago, Jubilacion said:

Are they efficient and affordable?

Are they practical for two adults to use as a way to get your propane consumption/cost down?

Yes and yes.   🙂  Here's a link to more info.   Bonus:   with the typical 80 to 90% gas savings....you also reduce needed gas visits by the same amount!    😉

STI Solar Technology :: Calentadores solares para agua

www.solartechnology.com.mx/CalentadoresResidenciales

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Interesting reading!  

I am interested in hearing about how others' panels are installed. Is your inverter connected directly to the CFE meter on a dedicated line?  Or is the invertor connected to your existing house electrical lines ?  If I understand it correctly, your panels create solar energy that can either be: 

           1) 100% pushed back to the CFE grid and CFE only charges you for what you used in excess of what you generate. 

           2) Or you can use the solar energy directly for your household consumption through existing house lines and then push back to CFE what is in excess to your needs - or if you need more that what you produce you can buy it from the grid. 

Would like to know if I have properly understood the two options and hear if one is more beneficial than the other.

We have 8 panels on the roof and I do no feel we are getting the production/benefits (last bill was $2624 Dec 9 - Feb 8 )  Granted there have been some cloudy days and the panels have been completely off for ~10 days due to work at the house) 

Thank you!

 

 

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CFE grid-tied net metering works as below, there are not multiple connection options:    

Any solar energy is first used as it is produced, with the excess going to the grid and being counted by the meter.      Any use from CFE, is counted on the other reading of  the meter.      And the CFE bills show both values, with the user paying just on the "net" use from CFE, or receiving a kWh credit if the "sent" is more than the "used.   Any credits are good on a 12 month rolling basis.   

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Many thanks for explanation Go Solar.  This is helpful.  I am still wondering about the installation though -  is it direct from invertor to CFE meter or from invertor to house wires to CFE meter. Based on what you have answered, I believe it is the latter.

Muchas gracias

 

 

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Your invertor normally would be connected to your circuit breaker box just like a breaker going to the house. Sometimes there might be a small breaker box added if there is no more room in the box you have. All the breaker boxes are connected to the cables coming from your meter. 

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15 hours ago, feewee said:

I am still wondering about the installation though -  is it direct from invertor to CFE meter or from invertor to house wires to CFE meter.

Both are valid; connecting inside the home is much more typical, however the electricity flows and registers the same way with either.

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Thanks so much for this, Go Solar and Mostly Lost -  the solar panel guys are coming this week to "reinstall".  An animal of some kind  (squirrel?) seems to have chewed through the panel wires and there is an opportunity to improve on the original installation at the same time.

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feewee, may I suggest that you have some kind of monitoring device installed as well. My Envoy Monitoring Device, has allowed me to track the actual production of each panel and it was immediately obvious that there was a problem with ONE of my five panels. Turns out it was the microinverter that failed but it was under warranty anyway. It takes a minute to go online to check production daily... a lifesaver. The Envoy cost $365 U.S. dollars and, imho, is worth it.  Also, if you can, have a microinverter installed on EACH panel. That way, the other panels keep working and it's easy to pinpoint a problem. I LOVE my Solar Setup although, if I had to do it  over again, I would use a company based locally and not in Guadalajara. My bad.

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Micro inverter technology has gone from 1 per panel, to 1 per 2 panels, and to 1 per 4 panels as well.      The latest can run 4 panels of 450 to 550 watts each (1.8 to 2.2 kW system size, more than enough to cover the DAC + level of consumption at lakeside) with a single micro and still optimize and monitor each panel individually while lowering upfront cost and having fewer potential points of failure.     Larger systems can be made up of multiples of these and expansion is seamless and essentially unlimited.        

 

 

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