Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

What are you paying for health insurance Lakeside?


Recommended Posts

As I mentioned before the public and general hospitals are undergoing a massive change right now, mainly caused by an over reach at the Presidente level. And being government funding they have reserved a huge number of beds in case of Covid. The public health system has more than 2 million members, when things clearup, they will push - votes in return for solutions.

Saying that, a person 84, on their own, no Spanish, would have a difficult time living here. It is much simpler for me. I fell for Mexico in the 1970's. I always wanted to immigrate here, and lucky for me my wife feels the same. There some maddening aspects of living here, probably the same as raising toddlers to teens.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, dottiejane said:

Reading these comments have made me rethink the move to Lake Chapala.  I had heard about the inexpensive and superior medical care in LC  but at 84 with a pacemaker and a history of breast cancer, I am totally confused as to what to expect. The idea of saving $250,000 for self-paying is not remotely possible for me.  One of the reasons I thought of moving was the cost of assisted living in Portland is about $5000 a month which I can't afford either and heard that the cost would be about $1600/month in LC - This is the kind of information that has to be deeply investigated before moving .  I have medicare A&B and United Health and this year i paid close to $3000 which included co-pays and 800 for the United Health coverage. I will have to really take a deep dive into this topic. 

Yes, I think that one can 'hear' things that maybe once were true or that are true for those with different circumstances still today, but at 84 with a pacemaker and pre-existing conditions private insurance is just not available. And don't assume that everyone here has a $250,000 cushion for medical because they surely don't! Those folks are going to try and make it with public medical assistance but that is not always available and may not be as desirable as sometimes is portrayed.

Your $1,600 for assisted living 'tho IS doable and the care is probably superior to the US version with respect to 'kindness'. 

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, MakeItSo said:

It is a sticker shock for me too, even after 20 yrs of wintering in Mexico. I understand rates are different off the Gringo trail, vary greatly and may be worth investigating.

I'm not aware that a public insurance policy is any more available... after a certain age and with certain preexisting conditions.... "off the Gringo trail".  If you have such information it would be nice if it were shared with us.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another thing about Mexico. Many who work caring for senior and handicapped, are doing the job because they like it, or are used to it, caring for family members, etc. There is not so much emphasis on an expensively earned piece of paper, which says they are licensed for whatever. Those people always want the highest wages, and often hate their work.

I have told this stort so many times - but you are new here, and might appreciate it.

The true story goes there was a woman actress in Hollywood. She was youngish, hired an architect to build her dream bungalow, and a full time live in maid ( as opposed to a cleaning lady). Then towards middle age, she found all the jobs were drying up. Downward, she eventually had to sell her beloved bungalow. At the same time, the maid decided it was time to retire back to a small town near San Miguel Allende. The actress always kept in contact with the Maid. The Maid said come and visit, I know you and you will love it here. The actress followed up, and visited, she arrives at the bungalow, and behold, it is an exact match for the one in Hollywood! Even the inside floor plan is the same! The maid said that she always loved her bungalow, and when she retired, she wanted to save to make the same. The actress is flabbergasted, what is next? The maid said we spent many good years living together, move in here plaease. Together we can make it. So that is what the actress did, and the maid, now close friend, looked after her until her dying days.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, RickS said:

I'm not aware that public insurance is any more available... after a certain age and with certain preexisting conditions.... "off the Gringo trail".  If you have such information it would be nice if it were shared with us.

The Occidente General Hospital (Zoquoquin), within the last two years, finished a whole new wing, dedicated to " Senior Care" based on the large chrome letters on the side of building. Their funding request was based on a need for seniors care throughout Jalisco. 260 new beds, new surgery, new ER- but never enough. The Federales seem to use the new facility heliport a lot. Secure for prisoners or officers - somehow?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, CHILLIN said:

The Occidente General Hospital (Zoquoquin), within the last two years, finished a whole new wing, dedicated to " Senior Care" based on the large chrome letters on the side of building. Their funding request was based on a need for seniors care throughout Jalisco. 260 new beds, new surgery, new ER- but never enough. The Federales seem to use the new facility heliport a lot. Secure for prisoners or officers - somehow?

Is this supposed to address dottiejane's quest or it is just for general information for the masses?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have now met two doctoras who work as specialists in Palliative care at Zocoquin. They are both passionate about what they do, one is licensed to prescribe and administer anaesthetic grade medications (say Morphine).My biggest fear is in the private Mexican and U.S. private care hospitals, they run your clock out to make as much money as possible. This could not happen in a public or general hospital.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

we have something called right to die in Oregon - you have to have a 6 month terminal illness diagnosis before a doctor will write a prescription -for the necessary drugs.  It isn't  for everyone but I have that in my medical power of attorney file and if I stayed here, I would take that route if necessary.

 

  The big issue is if you have something like a stroke which doesn't provide a terminal diagnosis- then you just have to find a way to cope - and it is VERY expensive. in the states or at least in Oregon - if you call 911 and an ambulance comes, they are required to do all of the things necessary to resusatate you. 

 

  Strange as it sounds  it often is hard to die - I have a 95 year old friend who lives alone in SF - she has broken both hips, shoulder, etc but always manages to heal even without surgery- she is "ready" as she says but outside of refusing food and drink, she has no option.  anyway - will be glad to get the names you mentioned and also if anyone has a suggestion for a good primary care type doctor, I would be happy to have it.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Kiko said:

An option for the terminally ill.

Mexico Euthanasia

 

Very powerful. Thank you.

My father-In-law, who was a second father to me, suffered from a calcified esophagus after radiation cancer treatment twenty years before. He couldn’t stand a feeding tube.

After consultation with his Priest, He booked himself into an Ottawa hospital and stopped eating until he died. The memory haunts me still.

May I die a more peaceful, and managed death.

SunFan

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

i have a nurse friend here in Portland who volunteers with Compassionate Choices and administers the necessary drugs when the patient is ready.   They  go quietly and peacefully within 15 minutes  or usually much less.  .  There has never been any struggling that she has witnessed and she has been doing this  for dozens of people the years.  All  are terminally ill, suffering  a  lot and  eager to leave all of that behind.  

My dog was injected at home by the vet and except for one last bark (which broke my heart by the way) was gone in seconds.  I suspect like most things in life there are differences

One hears often of those stories where prisoners on death row do suffer but I have no idea what drugs are used or administered..  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, timjwilson said:

Ever asked anyone how painless it was? I watched a dog pass, injected with pentobarbital who seemed to struggle against it.  

Good Question.  I have no personal experience with the process.  Most of us never know the answer until we are in the moment.  I do think it should be legal for each person to make their own private decision.  They are not harming others in any way with that personal decision.   I know a person now struggling with this decision and that is why I posted.  She is 68 and has lost both her mother and husband to Covid.  She contracted Covid (vaccinated 1 and 2) and survived but needed a quintuple bypass soon after.  Now basically bedridden. She wants this option but it is not available in Texas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

a couple of years ago, a young woman some them the MidwestI think  with terminal brain cancer moved with her husband to Portland for the chance to have the choice to die. . It got quite a bit of publicity so here was a huge fuss on social media  but her husband and parents went with her.and she went peacefully as she wanted.  

Have read of people with non-terminal but life changing situations like a stroke who have gone to Switzerland where you can be given the necessary drugs without Oregon's six month terminal diagnosis rule.  .  Many who don'[t agree with that choice call it outright  euthanasia and argue that it leads to killing Granny or something similar.  I think even in Switzerland that wouldn't happen since you do have to be in a hospital with doctors present I believe.   Perhaps  folks who aren't undergoing similar suffering should allow others who are to have the choice without judging 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, dottiejane said:

we have something called right to die in Oregon - you have to have a 6 month terminal illness diagnosis before a doctor will write a prescription -for the necessary drugs.  It isn't  for everyone but I have that in my medical power of attorney file and if I stayed here, I would take that route if necessary.

 

  The big issue is if you have something like a stroke which doesn't provide a terminal diagnosis- then you just have to find a way to cope - and it is VERY expensive. in the states or at least in Oregon - if you call 911 and an ambulance comes, they are required to do all of the things necessary to resusatate you. 

 

  Strange as it sounds  it often is hard to die - I have a 95 year old friend who lives alone in SF - she has broken both hips, shoulder, etc but always manages to heal even without surgery- she is "ready" as she says but outside of refusing food and drink, she has no option.  anyway - will be glad to get the names you mentioned and also if anyone has a suggestion for a good primary care type doctor, I would be happy to have it.  

Good primary care doctor who my husband and I have used for several years:

Dra. Jessica Flores

Guadalupe Victoria, Ajijic, #101C

phone: 331 050 4287

She is also involved with an assisted living facility in the area.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Kiko said:

Good Question.  I have no personal experience with the process.  Most of us never know the answer until we are in the moment.  I do think it should be legal for each person to make their own private decision.  They are not harming others in any way with that personal decision.   I know a person now struggling with this decision and that is why I posted.  She is 68 and has lost both her mother and husband to Covid.  She contracted Covid (vaccinated 1 and 2) and survived but needed a quintuple bypass soon after.  Now basically bedridden. She wants this option but it is not available in Texas.

I have this consideration in my future but do ponder the least unpleasant exit. I have read about pentobarbital some time back. Having accidentally taken a wee bit too much morphine once orally; I found quite unpleasant and have heard it spoken of as an easy ride out. Perhaps IV is a different story. Whatever I was given for my last few surgeries seems like it would suffice nicely.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dottiejane, you are correct about the fees and care availability in many of the care homes. However, while day to day expenses are affordable, serious medical intervention and hospital care is, as I stated earlier, cheapER NOT cheap.

Many retirees thinking about an escape to this lovely area have simply started too late in life for it to be affordable. Many assume that their Medicare or even insurance from a retirement benefits package will cover them here and think no more about it until they find out that it will not. That is sad and puts one in a difficult position, in addition to having to financially qualify for permanent/temporary residency.

I am the one that suggested the $250,000 health care slush fund, based upon personal experience. In cases of brain surgery or multiple illnesses, that might wipe it all out in a year or two.

There is no need to be confused. It boils down fairly simply.

#1 You must qualify for Temporary or Permanente Residency.

If you cannot be covered under your current Medicare plan here in Mexico, then you have only a couple options :

* After you qualify for residency, go ahead and live life with no insurance, hope for the best and pay for any and all medical care + transportation yourself. There is no safety net here. After you exhaust all your funds, you will be sent home. That is the end of life for many. That is also when we see the Go Fund Me campaigns.

* After you qualify for residency, see if you can enroll in the Federal Health Insurance, maybe with exclusions for pre-existing conditions. Be prepared for long wait times, and sometimes you will NOT get to see the DR even if you had an appointment. Expect repeat visits every month for Rxs, but sometimes the meds are available and sometimes they are not. There may be open and mixed sex wards if you are hospitalized, and you will need to bring your own linens, toilet paper, soap, towels, nightgowns, water, even food and your daily care items + pay for someone to be with you 24/7 and they or you will need to speak Spanish. Nurses there do not do that kind of patient care. That is what families are for.

Many people come for 6 months, stay as a tourist and use their Medicare. Or, you can buy travel insurance. Problem is that immigration is no longer automatically granting 6 months visas.

SKY MED if you are stable enough to be transported back to your home in the USA. Of course, if you have to be in hospital for a while to be stabilized, you must pay.

It sounds cruel,but moving to Mexico is certainly not for the poor, not for people on fixed incomes with no cash backup, or even many of the middle class who are tethered to the Medicare System or the insurance in their retirement package. 

I wish you luck.

 

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you cstone for what I believe is a very rational look at what is required and  available.... and to whom.... vis a vie medical care in Mexico. This 'situation' has evolved over the years here and 'old stories' about retirement here are somewhat out of sync with (my) reality. 

One 'could' have less funds and get lucky toward the end of life here and pretty much go peacefully... or at least not a lingering painful demise. But THAT is a crapshoot is it not.

Having said this, end of life NOB is often not a picnic either for those whose financial situation is bleak, Medicare or not. Medicade for the indigent is almost never a 'nice way to end it all' either. So maybe prior to the end, living here in this Paradise might be the best way forward after all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the information - have thought about all of this at length of course and am well aware that age is a problem for almost everything.  Even if I  stayed here with Medicare and health insurance,  I would not undergo drastic costly medical treatment just to get another couple of months of non-active dependent living.  I carried on the family tradition of no colds but a lot of cancer and expect that is what will  get me in the end and if it does, I will go gently into the night.  Right now, I want to live my remaining years in the sunshine, eating good food,  meeting new people,l learning Spanish  and maybe even buying a bike..    I have decided I can't live these next years however long they are, worrying about what MIGHT happen and giving up the joys of the moment.  But understand your points.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, RickS said:

Thank you cstone for what I believe is a very rational look at what is required and  available.... and to whom.... vis a vie medical care in Mexico. This 'situation' has evolved over the years here and 'old stories' about retirement here are somewhat out of sync with (my) reality. 

One 'could' have less funds and get lucky toward the end of life here and pretty much go peacefully... or at least not a lingering painful demise. But THAT is a crapshoot is it not.

Having said this, end of life NOB is often not a picnic either for those whose financial situation is bleak, Medicare or not. Medicade for the indigent is almost never a 'nice way to end it all' either. So maybe prior to the end, living here in this Paradise might be the best way forward after all.

Rick- I lived in Denver for years starting in 1968 when it truly was a COWTOWN - Both of my kids are still there and busy with their own families and worrying about the rising cost of living so helping Mother is not an option. Moved to Portland 9 years ago only to be confronted with another huge rise in the cost of living as well as the sad decline of this lovely city.  Many are in  my situation in that  I was never indigent - I had a house, a car , food on the table and even  alot of trips.  But single parenthood, too early retirement (my fault) and the choice to enter a not very well paying  career ,led me (and many women Iknow) into the situation I am in today.  . I  have enough to live a fairly decent comfortable if simple life   But if I needed assisted living and/or nursing care I  would need to "spend down" as they say and go into a Medicaid facility .  It is somewhat sad to see  what a "limited income" is these days.  Didn't that used to be the middle class?  

Since I have no idea what the future holds, I am holding my nose so to speak and taking the plunge and letting  the universe guide me  It has  gotten  me through 84 years with only the normal amount of trauma so perhaps it will continue  for the next few.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, cstone said:

Dottiejane, you are correct about the fees and care availability in many of the care homes. However, while day to day expenses are affordable, serious medical intervention and hospital care is, as I stated earlier, cheapER NOT cheap.

Many retirees thinking about an escape to this lovely area have simply started too late in life for it to be affordable. Many assume that their Medicare or even insurance from a retirement benefits package will cover them here and think no more about it until they find out that it will not. That is sad and puts one in a difficult position, in addition to having to financially qualify for permanent/temporary residency.

I am the one that suggested the $250,000 health care slush fund, based upon personal experience. In cases of brain surgery or multiple illnesses, that might wipe it all out in a year or two.

There is no need to be confused. It boils down fairly simply.

#1 You must qualify for Temporary or Permanente Residency.

If you cannot be covered under your current Medicare plan here in Mexico, then you have only a couple options :

* After you qualify for residency, go ahead and live life with no insurance, hope for the best and pay for any and all medical care + transportation yourself. There is no safety net here. After you exhaust all your funds, you will be sent home. That is the end of life for many. That is also when we see the Go Fund Me campaigns.

* After you qualify for residency, see if you can enroll in the Federal Health Insurance, maybe with exclusions for pre-existing conditions. Be prepared for long wait times, and sometimes you will NOT get to see the DR even if you had an appointment. Expect repeat visits every month for Rxs, but sometimes the meds are available and sometimes they are not. There may be open and mixed sex wards if you are hospitalized, and you will need to bring your own linens, toilet paper, soap, towels, nightgowns, water, even food and your daily care items + pay for someone to be with you 24/7 and they or you will need to speak Spanish. Nurses there do not do that kind of patient care. That is what families are for.

Many people come for 6 months, stay as a tourist and use their Medicare. Or, you can buy travel insurance. Problem is that immigration is no longer automatically granting 6 months visas.

SKY MED if you are stable enough to be transported back to your home in the USA. Of course, if you have to be in hospital for a while to be stabilized, you must pay.

It sounds cruel,but moving to Mexico is certainly not for the poor, not for people on fixed incomes with no cash backup, or even many of the middle class who are tethered to the Medicare System or the insurance in their retirement package. 

I wish you luck.

 

 

 

"After you qualify for residency, see if you can enroll in the Federal Health Insurance, maybe with exclusions for pre-existing conditions. "

There is in the better socialized medicine system in Mexico called the IMSS where exclusion to join  because of pre-existing medical conditions AND wait periods from 6 months to 3 years to cover other pre-existing medical conditions not exclusions for treatment for these conditions.

The other socialized medicine system in Mexico with no exclusions to join or waiting periods that any legal resident can join is called INSABI but it has much less coverage and does not cover any third tier illnesses.

If you go to a general hospital's emergency with a major illness including 3rd. tier illnesses you can be admitted or outpatiented if it is taking INSABI insurance (example: Guadalajara Civic Hospital) and be diagnosed and treated at a per fee for services rate I guess to be about 1/4 the cost of the bottom rung of private hospitals like Star Medica and about 1/8 the cost of a top rung private hospital but maybe not with the best results.

I know many Mexicans doing this with good results.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, dottiejane said:

Snip.....

But if I needed assisted living and/or nursing care I  would need to "spend down" as they say and go into a Medicaid facility . 

IMO, before one reaches that point there is NO BETTER PLACE to be than here enjoying one's life in this paradise. You will be fine and I wish you the best.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Be careful about beleiving what one is told about accepting Medicare in Mexico.

Yes, your Medicare and Supplement or a Medicare Advantage Policy *may* cover one for emergency care outside of the US.... generally on a re-payment basis.... but ONLY for those who are VACATIONING/TRAVELING in but not LIVING in Mexico.

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, RickS said:

Be careful about beleiving what one is told about accepting Medicare in Mexico.

Yes, your Medicare and Supplement or a Medicare Advantage Policy *may* cover one for emergency care outside of the US.... generally on a re-payment basis.... but ONLY for those who are VACATIONING/TRAVELING in but not LIVING in Mexico.

 

 

8 minutes ago, RickS said:

Be careful about beleiving what one is told about accepting Medicare in Mexico.

Yes, your Medicare and Supplement or a Medicare Advantage Policy *may* cover one for emergency care outside of the US.... generally on a re-payment basis.... but ONLY for those who are VACATIONING/TRAVELING in but not LIVING in Mexico.

 

Going to the ER under m=Medicare AND United here, costs $90 - so if San Antonio charges that much, I am used to that.  - I have spent many a year worrying about money and seeking bargains usually at Goodwill - maybe I will just pay the "market rate" now and be done with it.  

This reminds me of a friend who has had two bouts of lymphoma and is now in a 45,000 A MONTH research program in CT which has the lymphoma in remission so the best medical care is costing her nothing.   BUT she is the most angry miserable person I know --there has to be a lesson in there somewhere.  

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...