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Car/motorcycle wreck on carretera in Ajijc


Mainecoons
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Thank for posting the warning. It saved me a great deal of waiting time in heavy traffic. Sadly, while driving on the side-street, I did see one body covered with a blanket or cloth lying in Carretera across from the Ajijic Pemex. Those attempting to go East or West on the Carretere were barely moving.

I feel very sorry for all concerned and hope for the best, if that is even possible for the family of the victim and any other participants in this terrible accident.

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Fatality was 26 year-old barber from the barbershop   on corner of Ramón Corona and San José in San Antonio. Whole town is devastated. One of his best friends told me the only good thing was they were told death was instantaneous.  😭  Small comfort to his fiancee and all his family.

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46 minutes ago, Mainecoons said:

FB put it out by waffle house.  It was in front of the Pemex.  Saw it personally.

Beats me how anything in that area could be moving fast enough on a Friday to have an accident, let alone a fatality.

Very sad sight.

What I read on FB, Motorcyclist has an accident and loses his life in front of the Ajijic gas station on the road to Chapala. The high speed of the motorcyclist reduced the reaction time, preventing him from seeing the truck leaving Aldama street, against which he crashed. The crash sent the pilot flying to another vehicle. Due to the impact, the subject is believed to have died instantly.

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I heard that too. The person I talked to said it was not to far West of Ponchos. I didn't mention it earlier because I thought the person reporting same might be getting locations wrong and I guess I wrongly assumed there was only one accident

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As if Friday traffic around here isn't crazy enough...

If ever there was a road where defensive driving, full riding gear and moderate speed is vital for motorcyclists, it is the Carretera.  They should make a video game out of it, the hazards are literally every few feet.

Very, very sorry for the family.  :( 

 

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Hate to say it but its just not safe to ride a bike,scooter or moto around here.  Also many folks just don't see folks on two wheels and yes I drove bikes and large motocycles in PNW before I stopped riding.  I was the only fellow who did not limp in our group of riders and most of them were hurt by four wheelers not seeing them. I imagine truck did not see him.   So SAD!

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I took a class in Arizona that was required to get insurance on a motorcycle.  The instructor said "There are only 2 kinds of motorcyclists.  Those that have been in an accident and, those that are waiting to be in an accident". 

Lakeside there are so many that are older and have vision issues of some kind.  So what lcscats said  "...many folks just don't see folks on two wheels..."  I agree with.  Yes, some cycle drivers weave in and out of traffic, pass on the wrong side of vehicles and sometimes don't obey traffic laws, but... if we don't see them, we will be the ones at fault if there is an accident, probably.

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It is the rider's job to see the truck and assume they are going to pull out, then slow down and cover the brakes.

I know many riders who have not had accidents.  That doesn't include dropping the bike on gravel or sand or a slippery hill  :D 

I've ridden for more than 60 years on or off, mostly on, without a serious wreck.  The key is to be mega defensive, maintain space around you, and be totally focused when riding.  Most motos have better brakes than cars and can stop faster.  If all else fails, you lay the bike down.

From what I understand here, the key to this wreck was excessive speed and failure to anticipate the truck might pull out on you.  Unfortunately, younger riders are very prone to ride too fast for conditions and fail to anticipate the "four wheelers" are not going to see them or respect the rules of the road.  That's  why they comprise the majority of motorcycle related fatalities.

You can ride around here safely but it does require a high level of awareness, defensiveness and correct assessment of speed appropriate to conditions.  There is a pretty large group of local riders who clock thousands of km riding here without crashes.  I'm taking a time out but looking to rejoin them on a lighter, lower moto.  I was riding an R1200GS that is a heavy, tall bike and it just got to be too much of both for me.

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23 minutes ago, Mainecoons said:

It is the rider's job to see the truck and assume they are going to pull out, then slow down and cover the brakes.

I know many riders who have not had accidents.  That doesn't include dropping the bike on gravel or sand or a slippery hill  :D 

I've ridden for more than 60 years on or off, mostly on, without a serious wreck.  The key is to be mega defensive, maintain space around you, and be totally focused when riding.  Most motos have better brakes than cars and can stop faster.  If all else fails, you lay the bike down.

From what I understand here, the key to this wreck was excessive speed and failure to anticipate the truck might pull out on you.  Unfortunately, younger riders are very prone to ride too fast for conditions and fail to anticipate the "four wheelers" are not going to see them or respect the rules of the road.

You can ride around here safely but it does require a high level of awareness, defensiveness and correct assessment of speed appropriate to conditions.  There is a pretty large group of local riders who clock thousands of km riding here without crashes.  I'm taking a time out but looking to rejoin them on a lighter, lower moto.  I was riding an R1200GS that is a heavy, tall bike and it just got to be too much of both for me.

I too will ride again after my trike is built for me. Most big bike riders don't ride in town at ridiculous speeds . Most of these mofos are young,ride little scoots and never gave safe riding a thought or took a course. Gravel once in around 1966 when my then wife leaned the wrong way and dropped the bike safely in Ajijic when a gringa turned in front of me without looking. I only ride motos with one seat now.

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Do they teach driver's ed in schools here? If so, do they emphasize motorcycle and scooter skills and safety?

Is there a separate test for m/c riders?

In US the MSF (Motorcycle Safety Foundation) conducts classes in conjunction with State DMV's where the riders are educated and tested for licensing (I've taken courses/testing in VA and AZ). 

Any sort of group here that teaches m/c safety?  

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All those 125cc scooters and  125cc honda small bikes do not require a special license. I believe a special multiple day class with piloting a bike is needed.  My test in Oregon was driving in a big parking lot  left, left, left and stop on a curved line to show you could control the bike braking and use turn signals.  I am amazed at the number of folks with new big bikes that don't understand that ABS in a car or bike needs a little bit of training.  I have taught a number of people how to use ABS and none of them knew how to steer and brake.  In fact one panicked when the ABS system pulsated the brake pedal for the first time.  Simple stuff but training is needed. I will be happy when costs come down so the average bike can have ABS at least on the front wheel so one can steer and brake.

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51 minutes ago, lcscats said:

All those 125cc scooters and  125cc honda small bikes do not require a special license. I believe a special multiple day class with piloting a bike is needed.  My test in Oregon was driving in a big parking lot  left, left, left and stop on a curved line to show you could control the bike braking and use turn signals.  I am amazed at the number of folks with new big bikes that don't understand that ABS in a car or bike needs a little bit of training.  I have taught a number of people how to use ABS and none of them knew how to steer and brake.  In fact one panicked when the ABS system pulsated the brake pedal for the first time.  Simple stuff but training is needed. I will be happy when costs come down so the average bike can have ABS at least on the front wheel so one can steer and brake.

You don't turn a moto by "steering,you do it by leaning and my front drum brake on my '53 beezer worked just fine. Hardly ever used the rear break  but instant down gear and front break did the trick if needed quick stop. Wouldn't want to see you on a moto thanks.

south shore for vampiros.jpg

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5 hours ago, sm1mex said:

The one in Riberas the boy was sitting on the side with paramedics. His leg was bandaged. 

This is the one I passed about 11:10 a.m.. I saw the young guy sitting at the side of the road, holding his head, seemingly stunned. His bike was on its side in the middle of the eastbound  lane. I was going to PT and it took a while after I arrived before we heard an ambulance.

Lexy

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