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Teaching in Ajijic


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Hello Everyone,

 

I am a US citizen interested in relocating to work in the Ajijic area as a foreign teacher. My experience includes more than 10 years in the field of education ranging from interdisciplinary EC-12th, lead foreign teacher, Chair foreign Dept. (managing 07 international programs), Educational Advocacy, Educational Consulting. My education background includes a B.A. in Educational Studies, M.Ed. in Instructional Design, and I have completed part of an Ed.D. program that I may continue remotely.

If anyone has any leads or information regarding possible opportunities for teaching posts that they'd like to share, I'd be most obliged.

I'd also appreciate any rental or general information for prospective members of the community. 

Thank you!

-Brandon 

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You are aware you can't just come here and immediately be allowed to work? The "American School" in Guadalajara might be starting point for possible interest in your skills, and things you have to do for permits etc. apart from  residency requirements.  (Mr. Google is your friend)

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I am a retired teacher, spec ed/elementary/ms/some hs/esl/adult ed. The last 10 years of my career were spent in one of the top 3 schools in Asia. 

I recommend that you do NOT plan to come and get a teaching job here in Ajijic. I suggest you try to connect with the American School Foundation in Guadalajara. You will need someone to sponsor your work visa, unless you are already a dual citizen or Permanenter of Mexico. You would have to prove that you are NOT taking a job that a Mexican can perform.

Salaries here for teachers are abysmal and from what I hear, conditions aren't so great, either. If you are looking for a position that is basically a volunteer post, something to keep you busy with enough pesos as salary to pay for your entertainment and a few meals out, and possibly enrollment in IMSS for medical, OK, check out the local schools. 

If you want a true international teaching experience with the benefits that go along with it, higher salaries and good medical benefits, vacations and paid time off, go for the international circuit. Apply to a hiring fair and pay the fee. Polish up your resume and look for schools in Mexico. There are good starter schools in Monterrey, for sure and Guadalajara has the American School Foundation.

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 try to teach something you know best and be connected to a school in the USA from the internet, this way you get a US salary.

also you will have a job before you come down here.

The first thing I as asked at the Mexican embassy will I be working in Mexico.  you need a permit

 

 

 

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Working in Mexico will require a Residence Visa, either Temporal or Permanente. The Temporal requires additional permission from Immigration authorities. There are financial requirements to qualify for these visas, and application imformation is available from Mexican consulates in your home country.

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Just as M

45 minutes ago, HoneyBee said:

Funny how Mexicans can cross the border and start on a job the same day. ☺️

Just as Mexicans can get illegal low paying jobs in the USA, Gringos can get an illegal low paying jobs in Mexico. The difference Gringos would not work for the $200 pesos a day

In the USA for a Mexican to get a permanent resident card will take about 19+ years waiting in line, unless you have $500,000 dollars to invest in a business or a needed skill and a company that will sponsor you. 

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Justathought and Honeybee, you can be as confused as you like, but do a little research. Mostlylost hit the nail on the head. You want to be here or there or Canada legally? Many obstacles. Working in Mexico is a cakewalk compared to working legally north of the border.

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if you come to lakeside and want to volunteer volunteer.

we need volunteers, to help with web pages. teaching English, administration, woodworking, teaching CAD and bookkeeping

or if you area woodworker can can come in work on projects,  that are requested.

www.havehammer.org

wodworking volunteers needed.jpg

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On 8/4/2021 at 1:29 PM, AndyPanda said:

Justathought and Honeybee, you can be as confused as you like, but do a little research. Mostlylost hit the nail on the head. You want to be here or there or Canada legally? Many obstacles. Working in Mexico is a cakewalk compared to working legally north of the border.

Well said …

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On 8/4/2021 at 1:52 PM, Mostlylost said:

Just as M

Just as Mexicans can get illegal low paying jobs in the USA, Gringos can get an illegal low paying jobs in Mexico. The difference Gringos would not work for the $200 pesos a day

In the USA for a Mexican to get a permanent resident card will take about 19+ years waiting in line, unless you have $500,000 dollars to invest in a business or a needed skill and a company that will sponsor you. 

As a matter of interest  is half  million the lowest price needed to invest?

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28 minutes ago, lakeside7 said:

As a matter of interest  is half  million the lowest price needed to invest?

Sorry, but I wasn't aware that the limits have been raised. Now it is $900,000  if your investment is in one of the designated areas, otherwise it is $1,800,000 million. The business must also be one that creates jobs. Now this is commonly done through companies that organize investment pools of multiple owners to open business' that qualify.  

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/us-visas/immigrate/immigrant-investor-visas.html

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Canada has just raised its target for new permanent residents to 410,000 per year, and at the same time lowered the bar on its point system for qualification. They are marketing this all very hard, because they realise the huge economic benefits to Canada, and Canadians,  now, and into the future.

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On 8/2/2021 at 12:44 AM, barroues said:

Hello Everyone,

 

I am a US citizen interested in relocating to work in the Ajijic area as a foreign teacher. My experience includes more than 10 years in the field of education ranging from interdisciplinary EC-12th, lead foreign teacher, Chair foreign Dept. (managing 07 international programs), Educational Advocacy, Educational Consulting. My education background includes a B.A. in Educational Studies, M.Ed. in Instructional Design, and I have completed part of an Ed.D. program that I may continue remotely.

If anyone has any leads or information regarding possible opportunities for teaching posts that they'd like to share, I'd be most obliged.

I'd also appreciate any rental or general information for prospective members of the community. 

Thank you!

-Brandon 

I taught in Mexico City at International House which is a very large chain of schools around the world. I took their CELTA training to teach English. CELTA gives you a certification from Cambridge University and is considered the gold standard of ESL certifications. I earned 250 pesos an hour through the school and I gave some private lessons for 400 pesos an hour. You can only reasonably be able to teach about 20 hours a week maximum in a large city. Most of the work comes from corporations who offer their employees this service. It is especially popular in companies where their professionals have a chance to be transferred to the United States or Canada. Virtually all classes are early in the morning or lunch time. I usually had classes at 7AM sometimes 8 and then during lunch. For some reason pharmaceutical companies in Mexico City often offered classes after work. Since I worked as a drug rep for many years I was given many of those classes. You have to travel all over a big city and that can be very time consuming. You spend almost as much time traveling as you do teaching. The opportunities to teach privately takes a lot of work as there is alot of competition and not that many opportunities. It is only the wealthy who can afford them. It is often for their children to help them pass the IELTS exam that is needed to study in Universities in the United States. You definitely need additional training to properly prepare those students. As others have said you need to be in Guadalajara. In Guadalajara I would think you will need a car to get around. Tourist and expat places like here in Ajijic and Puerto Vallarta have no opportunities to teach English independently. Most adults speak English and the children of wealthy families go to the top private schools where almost all if not all classes are taught in English except of course their Spanish class. 

If you would like to work in a private school there are definitely opportunities for that too. There area numerous websites where you can speak to other teachers worldwide and websites that have job offers. Now with Covid I cannot say the state of things. There are never any jobs where you will not be living paycheck to paycheck and living like a local does. On a good month I earned about 15-18,000 pesos. But remember starting in mid December until mid January and for about 3 weeks surrounding Semana Santa there are usually not classes whatsoever. Also there can be less classes in the summer offered especially because so many families go to family homes or beaches with their kids. There were some months that I could get by on my teaching but there were other at least 4 months that I had to draw on outside resources to survive. 
Virtually every teacher I met was either retired like myself who had outside resources and was doing this job for fun, young people who were living 4 or 5 in a two bedroom and getting help from mom and dad, or Mexican teachers who were living at home with their families.

Hope this helps

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1 hour ago, LT56NY said:

I taught in Mexico City at International House which is a very large chain of schools around the world. I took their CELTA training to teach English. CELTA gives you a certification from Cambridge University and is considered the gold standard of ESL certifications. I earned 250 pesos an hour through the school and I gave some private lessons for 400 pesos an hour. You can only reasonably be able to teach about 20 hours a week maximum in a large city. Most of the work comes from corporations who offer their employees this service. It is especially popular in companies where their professionals have a chance to be transferred to the United States or Canada. Virtually all classes are early in the morning or lunch time. I usually had classes at 7AM sometimes 8 and then during lunch. For some reason pharmaceutical companies in Mexico City often offered classes after work. Since I worked as a drug rep for many years I was given many of those classes. You have to travel all over a big city and that can be very time consuming. You spend almost as much time traveling as you do teaching. The opportunities to teach privately takes a lot of work as there is alot of competition and not that many opportunities. It is only the wealthy who can afford them. It is often for their children to help them pass the IELTS exam that is needed to study in Universities in the United States. You definitely need additional training to properly prepare those students. As others have said you need to be in Guadalajara. In Guadalajara I would think you will need a car to get around. Tourist and expat places like here in Ajijic and Puerto Vallarta have no opportunities to teach English independently. Most adults speak English and the children of wealthy families go to the top private schools where almost all if not all classes are taught in English except of course their Spanish class. 

If you would like to work in a private school there are definitely opportunities for that too. There area numerous websites where you can speak to other teachers worldwide and websites that have job offers. Now with Covid I cannot say the state of things. There are never any jobs where you will not be living paycheck to paycheck and living like a local does. On a good month I earned about 15-18,000 pesos. But remember starting in mid December until mid January and for about 3 weeks surrounding Semana Santa there are usually not classes whatsoever. Also there can be less classes in the summer offered especially because so many families go to family homes or beaches with their kids. There were some months that I could get by on my teaching but there were other at least 4 months that I had to draw on outside resources to survive. 
Virtually every teacher I met was either retired like myself who had outside resources and was doing this job for fun, young people who were living 4 or 5 in a two bedroom and getting help from mom and dad, or Mexican teachers who were living at home with their families.

Hope this helps

Reality is helpful for those who accept it. Good post!

 

pedro kertesz

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On 8/2/2021 at 10:25 AM, cstone said:

You would have to prove that you are NOT taking a job that a Mexican can perform.

Can you point out where this is stated? I read this all the time, put forth by retired gringoes. It is not at all true, in my experience. I, and many other foreigners have started businesses here without having to prove any such thing. And my daughter got a teaching job at the international school here in Sayulita without having to prove she wouldn't be taking a job away from a Mexican. I think it's just some baseless rumor, endlessly repeated as if it were fact.

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