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This report tells the story of Lake Cuitzeo, with an area around 1/3rd the size of Lake Chapala located about 275 km east from here, which today is 70% dry.  The story highlights a number of contributing factors -- dry weather, pollution, expanding cities, poor water management, the lack of infrastructure needed to collect and preserve rainfall.  Can it happen here?

"Doomed to Stay: The Dying Villages of Mexico’s Lake Cuitzeo"
As Mexico’s reservoirs run dry, the fishermen, farmers and ranchers stuck on the drying lake beds wonder how they will survive.
Al Jazeera news - 25 July 2021

https://bit.ly/3ztFQUi

Photo1.thumb.jpg.6da8c4c6f7cdfa3e00eb397b56b21546.jpg

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Amazon Mexico has some excellent quality Tequilas and Mezcals for sale to help you get over thinking about this and onto something more realistic and pleasant.

We decided to move here in 2001 and the first foto shows where the lake was then. The group buddies del Lago did all kinds of spin doctoring and tried to convince all the ferners that the lake was about to become a dust bowl. the second foto is 2019 and there was a baseball diamond there and the shoreline was 1 mile further out in 2001. I recommend that you find something else to occupy your mind with.

lake chapala 2001.jpg

chapala beach semena santa sabados 2019.jpg

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Sorry, I do not drink Tequilla, but I think the point made is valid. Take a look at lake mead (spelling) which is created by the Boulder dam which holds back water form the Colorado river. Its so low that they had to reduce the power output. The demand in water has increased drastically because of the way Los Angeles and Las Vegas have expanded. The world can only support so many ☹️ 

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21 minutes ago, HoneyBee said:

Sorry, I do not drink Tequilla, but I think the point made is valid. Take a look at lake mead (spelling) which is created by the Boulder dam which holds back water form the Colorado river. Its so low that they had to reduce the power output. The demand in water has increased drastically because of the way Los Angeles and Las Vegas have expanded. The world can only support so many ☹️ 

Not interested in the Colorado River infrastructure because I live here which has absolutely no relation to that and won't get into hand wringing about a place I have called home for 15 years which has billshyte constantly flying around about it. The OP's point and yours are not valid,just more useless negative shyte. Since you're from Quebec,I'm surprised that you haven't mentioned Montreal and other towns dumping raw sewage into the St. Lawrence if your going to post irrelevant issues to us here.

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13 minutes ago, lcscats said:

Pedro you don't have to always  be a jerk when you disagree with someone.   Its just not needed or wanted.

I would respond the same face to face in a debate and that is reality and calling a spade a spade, not jerkism[sic]. If you feel that YOU don't need it or want it ,don't read it. I don't sing kumbaya but if that's your thing, go right ahead.

pedro kertesz

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You must have got punched out a lot growing up, or did just run away and hide like you did from Jim Wilson? You still remind me of Lil Donny in the Big Lebowsky.

Warning some bad language

 

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17 minutes ago, CHILLIN said:

You must have got punched out a lot growing up, or did just run away and hide like you did from Jim Wilson? You still remind me of Lil Donny in the Big Lembowsky.

Again you are lying just like you did try about the fishing trip and member sunfan who was on the trip called you out . Your personal attack which I laugh in your face about amuses me just like the many others you have tried. I took punches and gave them too as well as shooting the boot in my youth as an individual and in a street gang in Parkdale. I did not hide from the violent drunk and wife abuser but hired  body guards while the local police tried to find him, to protect my wife and I when we went out. His wife finally had enough and divorced him. She was wife # 5. Does it make you happy that you have now also insulted my very worried wife who took his threats seriously?

8.jpg

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4 hours ago, Brian Dalziel said:

This report tells the story of Lake Cuitzeo, with an area around 1/3rd the size of Lake Chapala located about 275 km east from here, which today is 70% dry.  The story highlights a number of contributing factors -- dry weather, pollution, expanding cities, poor water management, the lack of infrastructure needed to collect and preserve rainfall.  Can it happen here?

"Doomed to Stay: The Dying Villages of Mexico’s Lake Cuitzeo"
As Mexico’s reservoirs run dry, the fishermen, farmers and ranchers stuck on the drying lake beds wonder how they will survive.
Al Jazeera news - 25 July 2021

https://bit.ly/3ztFQUi

Photo1.thumb.jpg.6da8c4c6f7cdfa3e00eb397b56b21546.jpg

Brian, they are experiencing similar conditions at the little lake in Ixtahalacan de Membrillos which you pass on the highway into Chapala. Our gardener from there says the soil has become too dry, it soaks up the rain but not enough to raise the water table. That takes stream from the mountains. It has dried before, nature takes it course, and the government restocks with live fish.

Droughts are common all over Mexico. It was my fear moving to Chapala. We moved where the water is sweet and abundant but we still filter drinking water. We still try to practise conservation, especially since our fracc is thinking of starting to charge for water. The previous condo we used to live in, the fracc wants 10,000 pesos to refill their repaired pool. Water used to be silver, but now it is gold.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Mostlylost said:

The lake goes up and down. Since Chapala is a natural lake controlled by nature as opposed to a reservoir with a dam controlled by man, it should continue to do as is has for possibly millions of years. 

 

https://www.ceajalisco.gob.mx/contenido/chapala/chapala/niveles.html

Thanks for providing the link. The Y axis appears to show the level in meters and my translator says Cota = level or height. But 90 meters does not seem correct. The lake is quite shallow. So what does Cota(m) ranging from 90-99 mean? Is it volume? If so, the graph indicates the lake does not change much in volume: a low of 90.8 in 1955 and high of 99.4 in 1935.

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Mexico is no stranger to drought.  Lake Cuitzeo has an even worse shallow water situation than Chapala.  It is like a giant evaporating pan over much of its area.  Only one of the causes listed is due to nature, the rest due to too many people engaging in too much wasteful irrigation, pollution and other bad management.  Pretty typical of people.

From the time I was 20 to now the population on earth has doubled.  They may still be eating for the most part but the collateral damage is piling up.  In the end, that is what will cause a great die off IMO.  Just too damn many people.

Individually we may be intelligent to varying degrees but collectively we are no better than that old test tube experiment where you put a few bacteria in a test tube full of rich broth (resources) and they breed until they exhaust their environment and completely die off.

 

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2 hours ago, happyjillin said:

I would respond the same face to face in a debate and that is reality and calling a spade a spade, not jerkism[sic]. If you feel that YOU don't need it or want it ,don't read it. I don't sing kumbaya but if that's your thing, go right ahead.

pedro kertesz

Yep jerk.

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Pedro. If your wife is insulted, please ask here to accept my apology. I'm sure she wishes you were banned, yet again, stay away from your poison spewing keyboard. My wife is the same way,but more something about " fighting in your own weight class"

Still, you should be the one embarassed, that she thought you were incapable of defending them from a bald, chemo emaciated, and dying victim of cancer. That is the core of my "beef". Plus you very wrongly implied that the son WAS a babykiller and coward.

Jim was very generous to his son and his son 's family. He left them a beautifully restored 1960's car, and got them enrolled into a program which builds housing for handicapped veterans. They got a new house. His ex wife got nothing, that is the way with some men. Ask Angus.

 

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6 hours ago, Brian Dalziel said:

This report tells the story of Lake Cuitzeo, with an area around 1/3rd the size of Lake Chapala located about 275 km east from here, which today is 70% dry.  The story highlights a number of contributing factors -- dry weather, pollution, expanding cities, poor water management, the lack of infrastructure needed to collect and preserve rainfall.  Can it happen here?

"Doomed to Stay: The Dying Villages of Mexico’s Lake Cuitzeo"
As Mexico’s reservoirs run dry, the fishermen, farmers and ranchers stuck on the drying lake beds wonder how they will survive.
Al Jazeera news - 25 July 2021

https://bit.ly/3ztFQUi

Photo1.thumb.jpg.6da8c4c6f7cdfa3e00eb397b56b21546.jpg

There are a number of very shallow lakes west of Lake Chapala that go dry yearly. If there is a good wind we get a dust storm here.

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47 minutes ago, Mainecoons said:

Mexico is no stranger to drought.  Lake Cuitzeo has an even worse shallow water situation than Chapala.  It is like a giant evaporating pan over much of its area.  Only one of the causes listed is due to nature, the rest due to too many people engaging in too much wasteful irrigation, pollution and other bad management.  Pretty typical of people.

From the time I was 20 to now the population on earth has doubled.  They may still be eating for the most part but the collateral damage is piling up.  In the end, that is what will cause a great die off IMO.  Just too damn many people.

Individually we may be intelligent to varying degrees but collectively we are no better than that old test tube experiment where you put a few bacteria in a test tube full of rich broth (resources) and they breed until they exhaust their environment and completely die off.

 

When I was going to university in the 1960s Greenpeace and many others were saying we have to control the earth's population. It was 6 billion then and now it is 9 billion. All is quiet now on the over population front. China had restricted families to have only one child-now they are thinking of raising it to 3. You can imagine whre we will end up.

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5 hours ago, happyjillin said:

Amazon Mexico has some excellent quality Tequilas and Mezcals for sale to help you get over thinking about this and onto something more realistic and pleasant.

We decided to move here in 2001 and the first foto shows where the lake was then. The group buddies del Lago did all kinds of spin doctoring and tried to convince all the ferners that the lake was about to become a dust bowl. the second foto is 2019 and there was a baseball diamond there and the shoreline was 1 mile further out in 2001. I recommend that you find something else to occupy your mind with.

lake chapala 2001.jpg

chapala beach semena santa sabados 2019.jpg

True story...Save the Lake was the group and lots of ferners contributed lots of pesos to "save the lake", lol.

Couple of years later the "dying lake" inundated the Ajijic park and they had a do-over there.

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Let's blame it on the Spanish for lower the lakes water exit. But like I was originally going to say, WE ARE DOOOOOMED !!!!!!

Maybe the bickering about climate change and cancel culture is due to the original cancel culture of ban Californians culture they keep spreading. Anyway the weather always changes but in an effort to gleam money the most natural thing on earth which is the weather changing gets a name of climate change / global warming and such so up pop the tax free organizations loaded with freaks sucking up donations and grants from the government as pay. 

I think the US doesn't want to suggest cloud seeding because most of the southern US states get their weather from Mexico. If Mexico seeds clouds the south doesn't get as much rain so eh. Seed the clouds with fireworks rockets :) Just don't make any duds and use parachutes for recoverable rockets :) 

I did catch the AJ story about the other lake. It didn't sound good for them. A little time and there's always a solution hint hint. 

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THE SKY IS FALLING!!! Pleeeze!!! I happen to be a history and archeology buff. I have read many stories about cultures way in the BC's that had to move from coastlines because of rising seas, and others completely wiped out by drought, floods, heat and ice, and all this before the internal combustion engine and fossil fuels. The above post makes good points regarding the $$$ aspects but I would suggest that we should be much more concerned by current social revolutions relating to a history much closer to us, such as the early 20th century!!! 

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I remember as recent as a half a million years ago Florida was under water. I was there. That Was before evil Republicans roamed the earth. The earth is always changing and will always change nothing man do can stop it. 

The Big Lebowsky is a classic. I loved it. 

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Lake Chapala is fed by the second largest river and watershed in Mexico.  The watershed is in 5 states.  When these watersheds begin to dry out we will have a lot of advanced warning.  And along that way, Guadalajara, the 2nd largest city in Mexico (HUGE political clout), which gets a large percent of its drinking water from Lake Chapala, will have something to say about the situation.  I wouldn`t keep up all night worrying about this.

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On 7/26/2021 at 10:43 AM, Brian Dalziel said:

This report tells the story of Lake Cuitzeo, with an area around 1/3rd the size of Lake Chapala located about 275 km east from here, which today is 70% dry.  The story highlights a number of contributing factors -- dry weather, pollution, expanding cities, poor water management, the lack of infrastructure needed to collect and preserve rainfall.  Can it happen here?

"Doomed to Stay: The Dying Villages of Mexico’s Lake Cuitzeo"
As Mexico’s reservoirs run dry, the fishermen, farmers and ranchers stuck on the drying lake beds wonder how they will survive.
Al Jazeera news - 25 July 2021

https://bit.ly/3ztFQUi

Photo1.thumb.jpg.6da8c4c6f7cdfa3e00eb397b56b21546.jpg

It happens. The Aral Sea in Asia is a much more extreme example.

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