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PETSOLE Anti Bark Device…any comments?


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In the pet section of Amazon Mexico for 299 pesos:

Effective Bark Control: The PETSOLE Bark Control Device uses high intensity ultrasonic technology and provides a safe and effective solution for dog training and bark control. Our Ultrasonic Bark Remote has a 20 foot long range effective control and is suitable for dogs of all sizes. With PETSOLE, everyone can train their dogs professionally

100% SAFE FOR YOU AND FOR DOGS: Our anti-bark aid emits an ultrasonic sound at 25KHZ that is not harmful to pets and is completely soft and inaudible to human ears. Compared to the dog shock collar, the ultrasonic bark plug will attract the attention of dogs without hurting it and it will eventually learn to associate barking with ultrasound, forming a conditioned reflex.

When my Minnie passed away at about 12 recently, my gardeners, who knew and loved her also, had recently taken a puppy off the streets. She was very frisky and since there was a baby in the house they asked if I might be interested. Not knowing anything else, I said sure. Well, it turned out that “frisky” was an understatement. I named her Kuka and shortly after it became Kuka Loca!!! Have had her for about 2 months now and in addition to getting into everything and consistently on the move, has started some incessant barking, seemingly for no reason. She is outside in a very large yard during the day and am sure that the neighbors are not happy. My other 2 rescue dogs, El Duke and Chiquita Banana, mostly ignore her and sometimes look at me seeming to say, “What’s up with that little bitch?”  At night I bring her in the house and she is dead tired by that time and mostly OK except constantly trying to get to my face to lick it like an ice cream cone! She is a sweet, charming dog who was quickly house trained but this barking situation seems to be getting out of control. Any comments about this devise or other suggestions to control this would be appreciated. Gracias

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I bought something similar many years ago. It wasn't practical for my dog so I gave it to a friend and she said it worked sometimes. As I remember, the trick is to put it at the right height for the dog's head so it hears the signal.

If the dog is not too smart, you might try a citronella collar. It squirts a bit of citronella in the dog's face, it is unpleasant and they stop barking. This worked for 3 days with my Corgi and he started barking again. I looked at him and said, "WHAT are you doing?" He gave me an evil Corgi grin, turned his head sideways so the collar sprayed in his ear, and barked happily.

Please don't use a shock collar. They are cruel and result in a dog who is afraid of everything.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The shock surprises the dog anddoes not hurt it. One of those worked well on my dog but when the battery goes the dog knows it and start barking again  also if you have severa dogs the bark of another dog if it is close can trigger the shock and confuse the dog. who behaved. 

Another problem if the dog is squitish is will make it worse.. so I have tried many different collars and long tern none of them were satisfactory. ALso some of the dogs seem to get depressed when they have those collars on..

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 7/11/2021 at 2:22 PM, gringohombre said:

She is outside in a very large yard during the day and am sure that the neighbors are not happy. My other 2 rescue dogs, El Duke and Chiquita Banana, mostly ignore her and sometimes look at me seeming to say, “What’s up with that little bitch?

It may not be practical for you to do so, but taking the dog out for walks and maybe throwing a ball or frisbee for her, or playing other games with her might solve the barking problem. Or even doing some sit, stay, come, lie down, training with her.

High energy young dogs, especially smart ones with working breed DNA, often bark a lot simply out of boredom.  Having a large yard for them doesn't do it- just as we like to get out of the house and be stimulated by things outside of our own home, so does the dog. I also have a barker, although she is generally barking at something, not just barking, but I find if I take her out for walks more often, and engage with her a lot, she barks less.

Also there are methods for teaching dogs not to bark neurotically (i.e. at nothing that poses a threat) if you have the time and interest to try them. One training method I read involves first teaching the dog to bark on command. I know that sounds counterintuitive, but once they have that down, it is apparently easier to get them to stop barking on command.

 

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  • 1 month later...

Just an update...Kuka Loca is doing better. The PETSOLE Bark Control Device did not do much good. I could tell that she heard the high frequency sound and stopped to look for a second and then resumed. I then had to resort to good old fashioned corporal punishment as much as I hated to. I took her leash out and gave her a few hard whacks. This got her attention and now when she starts to go off I simply take out the leash, get her attention, wave it shouting "no". She then goes prone on the ground as if saying "please no". Also after I took her to Dr. Pepe for her "fix" operation she seems to have settled down somewhat although still very frisky but a lot less barking. So no future Kuka Locas', and El Duke, Chiquita Banana and myself are breathing easier now that she is a happy part of our family. 

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1 hour ago, gringohombre said:

I then had to resort to good old fashioned corporal punishment as much as I hated to. I took her leash out and gave her a few hard whacks. 

No, you didn't have to resort to that. You needed to learn dog training skills. Dog training involves command and reward, not punishment. Whacking your dog with a leash is disgusting.

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29 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

No, you didn't have to resort to that. You needed to learn dog training skills. Dog training involves command and reward, not punishment. Whacking your dog with a leash is disgusting.

I think that myself, El Duke, Chiquita Banana, our neighbors and indeed Kuka Loca herself would disagree!!! All is good now...what is wrong with that??? Sometimes a little tough love is the best medicine...

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3 hours ago, Lexy said:

Corporal punishment? A few hard whacks? Quoting you.  What is that--a mini-beating?

I don't doubt you love your dogs. I guess.

Get lost...You do not know me at all, and how many dogs I have adopted right off the streets. The three I have now are all treated as good as any dog I could imagine. You discipline your dogs your way and I will mine. This dog was completely out of control and now much more calm and VERY appreciating of the loving home she has!!!

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Sounds like "spare the rod and spoil the child". Meaning the parent has no parenting skills.

Doesn't matter how many dogs you adopt off the street if you abuse them. 

Of course the dog is much more calm. She fears a whipping with the leash if she isn't. 

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35 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

Sounds like "spare the rod and spoil the child". Meaning the parent has no parenting skills.

Doesn't matter how many dogs you adopt off the street if you abuse them. 

Of course the dog is much more calm. She fears a whipping with the leash if she isn't. 

Are you accusing me of abusing dogs? You are the one who is the SICK person!!! Maybe the reason for all the raising crime and and family violence among young people today is just because they have not been shown strongly that there are certain rules to be obeyed in a civil society. GET REAL!!!

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On 9/28/2021 at 9:22 PM, mudgirl said:

No, you didn't have to resort to that. You needed to learn dog training skills. Dog training involves command and reward, not punishment. Whacking your dog with a leash is disgusting.

Are you also gonna admonish the momma dog for biting her pup when it gets outta line?

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2 hours ago, happyjillin said:

Are you also gonna admonish the momma dog for biting her pup when it gets outta line?

Not at all. That is instinct and natural. And mother dogs aren't trying to train their offspring not to bark neurotically, sit or stay when told, or heel instead of dragging the owner down the street while on the leash.

Humans are supposed to be capable of acting on intelligence and information which is readily available, and there are many dog training resources available. Dog training, like anything else, has people who are experts in their field- based on studies and observation, the commonly accepted and recommended methods of dog training, by all dog trainers, are based on command and reward, not physical punishment.

Young pups are given food treats and praise for following commands, as the dog gets older, and a bond forms between the dog and its owner, and they seek the owner's praise, you gradually stop offering the treats and only reward with praise.

There is no need to physically hurt your dog in order to get it to behave.

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32 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

Not at all. That is instinct and natural. And mother dogs aren't trying to train their offspring not to bark neurotically, sit or stay when told, or heel instead of dragging the owner down the street while on the leash.

Humans are supposed to be capable of acting on intelligence and information which is readily available, and there are many dog training resources available. Dog training, like anything else, has people who are experts in their field- based on studies and observation, the commonly accepted and recommended methods of dog training, by all dog trainers, are based on command and reward, not physical punishment.

Young pups are given food treats and praise for following commands, as the dog gets older, and a bond forms between the dog and its owner, and they seek the owner's praise, you gradually stop offering the treats and only reward with praise.

There is no need to physically hurt your dog in order to get it to behave.

And how many working dogs or any dogs have you trained. My wife was just like you when I was training my last working dog. So when we got our last street dog here I  deferred to her method [no punishment] so big Chuck will jump all over anyone that comes here with unbrideled[sic] excitement and noise and we try to stop him with yelling for 5 years now to no avail. My working dogs had excellent bond with me until they died of old age. How many dogs do you know of that heal without a leash no matter what goes on around them-eh!

tobins first retrieve a.jpg

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2 hours ago, mudgirl said:

Not at all. That is instinct and natural. And mother dogs aren't trying to train their offspring not to bark neurotically, sit or stay when told, or heel instead of dragging the owner down the street while on the leash.

Humans are supposed to be capable of acting on intelligence and information which is readily available, and there are many dog training resources available. Dog training, like anything else, has people who are experts in their field- based on studies and observation, the commonly accepted and recommended methods of dog training, by all dog trainers, are based on command and reward, not physical punishment.

Young pups are given food treats and praise for following commands, as the dog gets older, and a bond forms between the dog and its owner, and they seek the owner's praise, you gradually stop offering the treats and only reward with praise.

There is no need to physically hurt your dog in order to get it to behave.

You are a know-it-all who knows nothing, and your self inflicted name here says it all...you love to get down in it!!! There are many ways to skin a cat, and don't you ever accuse me of animal abuse...I love cats and have had many in the past!!!

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5 hours ago, happyjillin said:

So when we got our last street dog here I  deferred to her method [no punishment] so big Chuck will jump all over anyone that comes here with unbrideled[sic] excitement and noise and we try to stop him with yelling for 5 years now to no avail.

If you read up on dog training you'd know that yelling doesn't work. Dogs perceive humans yelling as something agitating, not calming. That's why when dogs get in a fight, the worst thing their owners can do, which is most people's natural reaction, is to start yelling or screaming- the dog sees that as you joining in the aggression and it escalates the fight. Using a low, calm, firm voice is what is recommended when disciplining dogs. 

I trained my dog not to jump up on me and other people in 2 days- every time she tried it, she got a knee in the chest, not hard enough to cause any pain, just to push her down and away. 

Of course, some dogs, just like people, are more intelligent than others, and learn quicker.

And when you adopt a street dog, you have no idea what has happened in that dog's life up to then. I have a friend who loves my dog and I caught him patting his own chest, encouraging my 70 pound dog to jump up on him. I gave him s**t, saying I had specifically trained her to not do that. So if a dog has been encouraged to do something, or formed certain habits before they came into your life, training can be much more of a challenge than if you have the dog from its puppyhood.

And if a street dog had been deprived of good nutrition as a puppy, it affects their brain development, just as it does in humans.

My dog was an incorrigible barker. I used to yell at her and it didn't help at all. It made it worse. What worked a lot better was going over to her immediately, saying "Hush" in a strong, calm voice, and giving her the treat she could smell in my hand and praising and petting her the instant she stopped barking. After awhile, she shut up as soon as I gave the command. (Actually, she usually seems to find it necessary to bark one more time and look at me pointedly, as if to say "Yeah, okay, but you're not totally the boss of me.")

 

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