Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

Tilapia available


Recommended Posts

Quote

 

At least two or three days a week I see a fisherman coming ashore with at least a wheel barrow full.. most Wednesdays at the Ajijic tianqui see it for sale still alive . So you have a choice China or the lake…Hobsons choice , My mother would have said .

Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Mainecoons said:

Don't they also farm these fish in Mexico?

Yes. and here in pens in the lake near Mezcala Island. Go upstairs to the fish monger in the Chapala Mercado and have him "dress" them for you. Totally fresh caught and some still flopping around on the table.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe the fish farm near Mezcala has changed to catfish ,as they get more money for “ bagre “ than they do for tilapia. Either way I would use them both if we didn’t have such a wonderful selection of fresh fish that I am familiar with at Costa Allegra fishmongers .

Link to post
Share on other sites

Farmed fish....often given antibiotics, coloring agents, growth hormones, etc. Their food is not natural, they are fed pellets.  It is neither good for the environment, nor a good environment for the fish.

I'm not super picky about food shopping; I don't insist on organics, etc. 

But I draw the line at farmed fish.

Get the fresh and wild fish from the Pacific, readily available here.  

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bisbee Gal said:

Farmed fish....often given antibiotics, coloring agents, growth hormones, etc. Their food is not natural, they are fed pellets.  It is neither good for the environment, nor a good environment for the fish.

I'm not super picky about food shopping; I don't insist on organics, etc. 

But I draw the line at farmed fish.

Get the fresh and wild fish from the Pacific, readily available here.  

The OP is seeking tilapia which are freshwater fish readily available here and what is available here doesn't fit in with what you describe as "farmed fish" by any stretch of the imagination.

If you are ancient,a child or pregnant it behooves you to limit your intake to once per week and you'll be just fine.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, happyjillin said:

The OP is seeking tilapia which are freshwater fish readily available here and what is available here doesn't fit in with what you describe as "farmed fish" by any stretch of the imagination.

If you are ancient,a child or pregnant it behooves you to limit your intake to once per week and you'll be just fine.

That warning convinces me not to eat locally farmed fish.  Why would I ingest something that is limited to 1x a week for a good part of the population?  I am not ancient, but would like to be some day :D   Eating healthy foods will help get me to that status.  

It is easy to get excellent wild fish here, why settle for less?

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bisbee Gal said:

That warning convinces me not to eat locally farmed fish.  Why would I ingest something that is limited to 1x a week for a good part of the population?  I am not ancient, but would like to be some day :D   Eating healthy foods will help get me to that status.  

It is easy to get excellent wild fish here, why settle for less?

I raised catfish and never gave then antibotics, but I did use pelleted feed plus regularly stocking minnows. I really don't believing diminishing wild stocks as their genes may be needed in the future 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Bisbee Gal said:

That warning convinces me not to eat locally farmed fish.  Why would I ingest something that is limited to 1x a week for a good part of the population?  I am not ancient, but would like to be some day :D   Eating healthy foods will help get me to that status.  

It is easy to get excellent wild fish here, why settle for less?

Back in the day I was developing a pilot for a hunting and fishing TV show. It was to be fishing the North Saskatchewan river where it ran through the city of Edmonton. I consulted with the scientists at the Alberta and Federal departments of swamps and bushes to cover all bases. The info[ infant/toddlers,pregnant women and those over 60] was precautionary measure/suggestion only. Most of the waters in Mexico are similar as are hundreds of lakes and rivers in all of North America where FRESH WATER fish are harvested commercially as well as sports angling activity. I am quite certain that most of us have partaken of fresh water fish over many years and still do and here we are alive to tell the tale. The fresh water fish,freshly caught, available from lake chapala commercially, are: charales,talapia,whitefish,catfish and carp. Recently  a Florida strain of large mouth bass was introduced for angling only. Many moons ago talapia introduced from Africa,carp from Europe and catfish from the US for commercial fishery all over Mexico. Charales and the whitefish species are native. The rainbow trout you get here is farm raised. Your reference to wild fish are probably ocean run not fresh water but both are available. Some people don't consider it "settling" to consume fresh water fish and gladly consume those and ocean fish with impunity.

  • Haha 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

In China, and many S.E. Asia countries, Tilapia are raised in sewage treatment basins. They eat crap. At one time this may have been acceptable, but with today's pharmaceuticals and other toxins in the sewage stream, I doubt if this is acceptable, if ran through a professional chemical detecting apparatus.

https://www.fluencecorp.com/role-of-tilapia-in-wastewater-treatment/

  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, CHILLIN said:

In China, and many S.E. Asia countries, Tilapia are raised in sewage treatment basins. They eat crap. At one time this may have been acceptable, but with today's pharmaceuticals and other toxins in the sewage stream, I doubt if this is acceptable, if ran through a professional chemical detecting apparatus.

https://www.fluencecorp.com/role-of-tilapia-in-wastewater-treatment/

Many years ago Cincinnati, Ohio closed there old septic plant and opened a new one.  Someone got a bright idea and bought the old one.  They cleaned it, filled with water and stocked catfish in it.  They opened a restaurant on the site and advertised you could catch your own meal.  You would catch a catfish, the restaurant would clean it, fry it and serve it to you while you were enjoying drinks.  Great idea but unfortunately no one could get over it being the septic system at one time and they had few customers.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

50 percent of all fish consumed is farmed. It's bad name is a misconception stoked by a very small percentage of poor methods. In 10 years estimates are 75% of all fish will be farmed. This is basically the same as beef cattle. Chickens. Pigs. You are eating it or you are not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fish farming of salmon has improved vastly over this past decade due to industry regulations put in place through environmental groups (Seafood Watch of the Monterrey Aquarium is one example).  Retailers such as Costco stopped selling famed salmon, until standards were required.  In the US, Costco only stocks certified farmed salmon.   

However, farmed fish out of Lake Chapala has no similar regulation or certification process.  The water quality of the lake is sub-standard.  

And again, with fresh wild fish readily available here, why take the risk??

Link to post
Share on other sites

Given the environmental damage caused by wild fishing we prefer the more sustainable farming.  Thanks to wild fishing, for example, species of turtle, porpoise and whales are routinely killed and endangered.  The Japanese and Chinese fishing fleets are notoriously damaging to the ocean environments.

That's why take the risk.  I wouldn't eat anything farmed in this lake because of the industrial pollution and toxics dumped there.  Personal preference.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bisbee Gal said:

Fish farming of salmon has improved vastly over this past decade due to industry regulations put in place through environmental groups (Seafood Watch of the Monterrey Aquarium is one example).  Retailers such as Costco stopped selling famed salmon, until standards were required.  In the US, Costco only stocks certified farmed salmon.   

However, farmed fish out of Lake Chapala has no similar regulation or certification process.  The water quality of the lake is sub-standard.  

And again, with fresh wild fish readily available here, why take the risk??

The only fish that is "farmed" in Lake Chapala are SOME TILAPIA in pens off of Mezcala island. Almost all tilapia and ALL the other fish I mentioned ARE FRESH and caught daily by the lake's fisherman. Do you seriously think all those pangas out there are just for ferrying tourists around. Are you ignoring the daily feeding of fish guts from wild fish to the pelicans by [GASP!] actual fishermen.   How does reality escape you for you can perpetuate your false diatribe? Fortunately for the fisherman and fish mongers here, you are in a tiny minority. And I  suggest to you that you are far from being qualified to call the water quality of the lake as substandard[to what?] In addition you appear to know next to nothing about fish. You have chosen to delude yourself and hopefully others aren't influenced by your BS.

chapala carp.jpg

chapala bass 2.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Bisbee Gal said:

You can get wild salmon from Costalegre in SAT; order in advance, it arrives on Wednesdays.  They also have a variety of fresh fish daily, varies with season and catch of the day.  

No need to eat farmed fish here.  

http://costalegrefishmarket.com/

The reality is that the tilapia and basa that they sell are farmed fish-SNORK!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, happyjillin said:

The reality is that the tilapia and basa that they sell are farmed fish-SNORK!

I didn't mention either of these fishes, I was talking about the wild salmon they import weekly.  But nice pivot, Hillary. 

Here's the latest report on the Lake's water quality.  Just jump to the charts on E.coli, mercury, etc.  

If you want to eat fish that is hatched, grown and farmed in toilet water, have at it.  

https://rei.iteso.mx/bitstream/handle/11117/5614/Calidad del agua del Lago de Chapala.pdf?sequence=4&isAllowed=y

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...