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Repair of a porcelain figurine


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White glue also works, with the advantage that any "runovers" can be removed from the piece while it is still liquid, and will not show as shiny spots when dry.  (Cloth and warm water to clean edges.) 

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I haven't used white glue since grade school on paper and that wasn't for anything like this.  Crazy glue or quick acting epoxy for porcelain,glass or metal. I repaired this antique lamp with epoxy in about 1965 and haven't had to do anything to it since. This is not my first rodeo in repairs like this. By the way for wood I use Elmers carpenter glue  as I found the WHITE carpenters glue sold here inferior.

picking adventures lamp.jpg

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I used acetone to clean the broken horses leg from an earlier damage then bought a product called TOP because, Gorilla super glue was not to be found here and TOP has a 5 second grip and hold guarantee....it worked. There is an obvious seam  where the repair was made....but the horse is back to a 4 legged variety. Thanks for the advice.

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On 2/13/2021 at 11:43 AM, happyjillin said:

I haven't used white glue since grade school on paper and that wasn't for anything like this.  Crazy glue or quick acting epoxy for porcelain,glass or metal. I repaired this antique lamp with epoxy in about 1965 and haven't had to do anything to it since. This is not my first rodeo in repairs like this. By the way for wood I use Elmers carpenter glue  as I found the WHITE carpenters glue sold here inferior.

 

Happyjillin, you might want to try Resistol 5000, if you haven't already.  It's really excellent for wood.  There are several different types, the one in the photo is for general use.  I use it fairly often, most recently the other day for re-gluing a shelf support with the back glued-on part of the support dried out.  (It's a very small 19th century chinoiserie shelf.)
image.thumb.png.880db78e31bf640ba0ef18f726d2786d.png

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Here is what is used in professional ceramic repair, which we call cold glazing. I have hundreds of raw pigments if you want to fix the seams. Although the business is called Lakeside, but it is not our Lakeside. I thought of going into this business, I have plenty of refs, but I am now horribly allergic to epoxy (senitized) and I don't think our Lakesiders would pay for repairs, even if they were invisible. They might pay if you had some Gorky Gonzalez pieces.

http://www.lakesidepottery.com/Pages/pottery-and-ceramic-fix-restoration-repair.html

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Freight/customs both ways plus their prices would reach $500.00 usd plus. It is the right place for my repair but the wrong country. What I've got is a figurine called "wild horses," three horses with their legs kicking by jjadro, (spelling), I ve got a crack  showing and some space on the leg I have repaired.......I just can't pay that price and the maid will probably bust it again.  Thanks for the contact.

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