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WORD AROUND TOWN IS THAT ALL THE HOSPITALS ARE FILLED WITH CV PATIENTS


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That comes from my medical insurance guy as well.  He says private as well as state hospitals are filled up.  This is not a good time to come here if you are thinking about it.  Just stay home!  I'm not traveling anywhere until CV is over with.  Might be a  long while.  I wouldn't want to get on a plane and find some wacko anti-masker there making trouble.

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Just for you RV...  

Hi I had covid in march 2020 here. There weren't many cases in the US then. I ended up with double pneumonia, was put on antibiotics, prednisone and oxygen.  I really had a hard time breathing. N

It may never be specifically NEGATED because, by its very date, it was true at the time. I can go back years in the Medical Journals and old articles of what worked at the time are still there. It doe

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Reports a Medical insurance guy,  A fracc rife with covid I can't tell you which ,30 foreigners at home dying in agony with covid says xxxxxx because no beds available.

Two of my nieces have been in hospitals in the last week. One for surgery, one to give birth. The hospital they were in was designated by the state as a non-covid hospital.

Months ago Jalisco designated which hospitals would accept covid patients. They even renovated and reopened one that had been closed for covid patients only as well as installing new beds in others. Even the Hotel Monte Carlo (owned by  the University of Guadalajara) has been selected for emergency housing of covid patients if necessary. 

 

The number of hospital beds in Mexico available for anything, for Covid, even the number of beds with respirators is available and updated regularly by the Secretaría de Salud Federal 

It is a bit difficult to search but clearly shows that there beds for all types covid, and non covid available in the GDL area as of today. 

Are there some full.. yes... but there are hospitals taking covid patients below 50% 

 

https://www.gits.igg.unam.mx/red-irag-dashboard/reviewHome

 

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4 hours ago, ezpz said:

That comes from my medical insurance guy as well.  He says private as well as state hospitals are filled up.  This is not a good time to come here if you are thinking about it.  Just stay home!  I'm not traveling anywhere until CV is over with.  Might be a  long while.  I wouldn't want to get on a plane and find some wacko anti-masker there making trouble.

Ah! The good old "word around town".-SNORK!

pedro kertesz

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So many people have it, labs reporting all test positive, spreading very fast.  Everyone will get it sooner than later and some maybe twice or 3 times, if you are overweight, older, smoke, drink, poor nutrition or plain bad genes then you may have more life threatening consequences than others.  

This is not going away and things are looking bleak for the next few months as ,many, many people report no beds at hospitals, medicine and oxygen hard to get.  

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7 minutes ago, Intercasa said:

Everyone will get it sooner than later and some maybe twice or 3 times.....

Spencer can you tell us where this information comes from?  I question whether either one of those statements are accurate.  

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10 minutes ago, RickS said:

Spencer can you tell us where this information comes from?  I question whether either one of those statements are accurate.  

I Think the only statement that is accurate is the fact there is  problem with oxygen refills,  and a bigger problem with lack of tanks.  The no beds in hospitals statements are totally inaccurate for this area.

Actually yesterday there were more covid beds available in Jalisco than the day before.  as reported by National secretary of health

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I have a doctor friend at the civil hospital in Guadalajara.  He is scared and worried and many of his coworkers are. There are no good stats published although I have many doctor clients and it is scary what they say.  Many, many people report on social media that they have had to go to 3,4 or 5 hospitals to find beds.  I didnt mean to say there are zero beds but if you need a bed, how will you find one?  Lakeside has more than Guadalajara but things are growing exponentially so beds may not last long.  Also I thought once infected never again but there are more and more confirmed reports of new strains and reinfections.  We cant live in a bubble

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2 minutes ago, Intercasa said:

I have a doctor friend at the civil hospital in Guadalajara.  He is scared and worried and many of his coworkers are. There are no good stats published although I have many doctor clients and it is scary what they say.  Many, many people report on social media that they have had to go to 3,4 or 5 hospitals to find beds.  I didnt mean to say there are zero beds but if you need a bed, how will you find one?  Lakeside has more than Guadalajara but things are growing exponentially so beds may not last long.  Also I thought once infected never again but there are more and more confirmed reports of new strains and reinfections.  We cant live in a bubble

Is the situation bad?  No one says it isn't.  There are no COVID specified hospital beds in Chapala. 

Two civil hospitals in GDL are below 60% occupancy as of this morning's report

If your doctor doesn't know how to call the help line  possibly you should do it yourself.  33 38 23 32 20

Also actually in Jalisco about 48% of tests are negative according to the  secretary of health and I think they would know. 

So you are entitled to your opinions.  But  Spencer I like many people have used you and respect you so what you say should be as accurate as your legal advice. 

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El Informador Jan 28

According to the cutoff of January 27, 2021, 2 of 53 COVID hospitals in Jalisco report 100% occupancy of patients in general hospitalization,  a considerable drop compared  to the previous day ) when seven saturated hospitals were reported.

However, there are 18 hospitals in total that still remain above 70% occupancy of general beds, which is the "security" level considered by federal health authorities.

Regarding beds with a respirator, 6 of 53 medical units report 100% (-1 compared to the previous day) and in Intensive Care Units 4 of 53 hospitals are saturated (-1 compared to the previous day).

 

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FYI from the American Journal of Medicine.  Published January 26.  

Figure 1

 

Quote

Zinc Lozenges And Zinc Sulfate

Zinc is a known inhibitor of coronavirus replication. Clinical trials of zinc lozenges in the common cold have demonstrated modest reductions in the duration and or severity of symptoms.18 By extension, this readily available nontoxic therapy could be deployed at the first signs of COVID-19.19 Zinc lozenges can be administered 5 times a day for up to 5 days and extended if needed if symptoms persist. The amount of elemental zinc lozenges is <25% of that in a single 220-mg zinc sulfate daily tablet. This dose of zinc sulfate has been effectively used in combination with antimalarials in early treatment of high-risk outpatients with COVID-19.20

Antimalarials

Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is an antimalarial/anti-inflammatory drug that impairs endosomal transfer of virions within human cells. HCQ is also a zinc ionophore that conveys zinc intracellularly to block the SARS-CoV-2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, which is the core enzyme of the virus replication.21 The currently completed retrospective studies and randomized trials have generally shown these findings: 1) when started late in the hospital course and for short durations of time, antimalarials appear to be ineffective, 2) when started earlier in the hospital course, for progressively longer durations and in outpatients, antimalarials may reduce the progression of disease, prevent hospitalization, and are associated with reduced mortality.22232425 In a retrospective inpatient study of 2541 patients hospitalized with COVID-19, therapy associated with an adjusted reduction in mortality was HCQ alone (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.25-0.46, P <0.001) and HCQ with azithromycin (HR = 0.29, 95% CI 0.22-0.40, P <0.001).23 HCQ was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 1955, has been used by hundreds of millions of people worldwide since then, is sold over the counter in many countries, and has a well-characterized safety profile that should not raise undue alarm.25,26 Although asymptomatic QT prolongation is a well-recognized and infrequent (<1%) complication of HCQ, it is possible that in the setting of acute illness symptomatic arrhythmias could develop. Data safety and monitoring boards have not declared safety concerns in any clinical trial published to date. Rare patients with a personal or family history of prolonged QT syndrome and those on additional QT prolonging, contraindicated drugs (eg, dofetilide, sotalol) should be treated with caution and a plan to monitor the QTc in the ambulatory setting. A typical HCQ regimen is 200 mg bid for 5 days and extended to 30 days for continued symptoms. A minimal sufficient dose of HCQ should be used, because in excessive doses the drug can interfere with early immune response to the virus.

Azithromycin

Azithromycin is a commonly used macrolide antibiotic that has antiviral properties mainly attributed to reduced endosomal transfer of virions as well as established anti-inflammatory effects.27 It has been commonly used in COVID-19 studies initially based on French reports demonstrating markedly reduced durations of viral shedding, fewer hospitalizations, and reduced mortality combination with HCQ as compared to those untreated.28,29 In the large inpatient study (n = 2451) discussed previously, those who received azithromycin alone had an adjusted HR for mortality of 1.05, 95% CI 0.68-1.62, and P = 0.83.23 The combination of HCQ and azithromycin has been used as standard of care in other contexts as a standard of care in more than 300,000 older adults with multiple comorbidities.30 This agent is well-tolerated and like HCQ can prolong the QTc in <1% of patients. The same safety precautions for HCQ listed previously could be extended to azithromycin with or without HCQ. Azithromycin provides additional coverage of bacterial upper respiratory pathogens that could potentially play a role in concurrent or secondary infection. Thus, this agent can serve as a safety net for patients with COVID-19 against clinical failure of the bacterial component of community-acquired pneumonia.31,32 The same safety precautions for HCQ could be extended to azithromycin with or without HCQ. Because both HCQ and azithromycin have small but potentially additive risks of QTc prolongation, patients with known or suspected arrhythmias or taking contraindicated medications or should have more thorough workup (eg, review of baseline electrocardiogram, imaging studies, etc.) before receiving these 2 together. One of many dosing schemes is 250 mg po bid for 5 days and may extend to 30 days for persistent symptoms or evidence of bacterial superinfection. (Click to Source)

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0002934320306732

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52 minutes ago, Mainecoons said:

FYI from the American Journal of Medicine.  Published January 26. 

https://tineye.com/search/b36b73f796a5420dd68e965346bd409f8f856581?sort=score&order=desc&page=1

Gosh, TinEye could not find that source.

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Why the Hydroxychloroquine Myth Persists

Hydroxychloroquine doesn’t appear to treat COVID-19. So why do so many people still believe otherwise?
 
 
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9 hours ago, AngusMactavish said:

That's probably why it is called tin eye.  Blind.  Like its users.

Once again:  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0002934320306732

And:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7534595/

No doubt you didn't check the source or read the piece.  It shows in the junk reference you posted.  Feel free to continue to ignore the mounting evidence this works.  BTW it was used in 5 instances in our family and worked perfectly in four, the fifth didn't start it soon enough and their recover was was slower than the less than one week of the rest.

Please rush out and take an unproven vaccine with the side effects piling up and keep pretending covid is untreatable.  And good luck to you.

 

 

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1 minute ago, Mainecoons said:

That's probably why it is called tin eye.  Blind.  

No doubt you didn't check the source or read the piece.  It shows in the junk reference you posted.

Hey dude, where is your source for American Journal of Medicine.  Published January 26? No link, plenty of puff.

TinEye is for the claims that don't exist, tattling on those that make crap up.

 

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Tin Eye is a reverse search tool used by photographers to see if their images have been stolen or misused.  It is not intended for medical searches.

TinEye was the first website to ever use image identification technology and to this date is still one of the most popular and widely used reverse search engines out there. It’s great for professional photographers or creatives who have worked online and want to see if any of it has been stolen or modified and reused. At the time this article was written, TinEye boasted 14.7 billion indexed images. In case you’re skeptical, TinEye makes its release and updates information publicly available at tineye.com/updates.

https://www.greenlanemarketing.com/resources/articles/reverse-image-search-tools-compared/

Sheesh.

 

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Oklahoma seeking to return $2M worth of hydroxychloroquine

Oklahoma is attempting to return $2 million worth of hydroxychloroquine

By SEAN MURPHY The Associated Press
January 27, 2021, 1:05 PM
 

 

 

OKLAHOMA CITY -- The Oklahoma attorney general's office is attempting to return $2 million worth of a malaria drug once touted by former President Donald Trump as an effective treatment for COVID-19, a spokesman said Wednesday.
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20 minutes ago, AngusMactavish said:

The link, please.

extraordinary_claims_require_extraordina

I've given it to you a number of times.  Maybe if you knew better how to search the web you would have found it by now.  Here is the direct link.  Just published this week in their January issue.

https://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(20)30673-2/fulltext

I'd like to continue to engage in a battle of wits with you but that would be taking unfair advantage.

Touted is not the same as mentioned.  Touted is one of those semantically loaded words used by biased sites.

Let me know if you'd like some help reading and understanding the paper.  I have a doctor friend who can help you with that and other issues.  She's pretty good with senility I understand.  :D 

 

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1 hour ago, Mainecoons said:

BTW it was used in 5 instances in our family and worked perfectly in four, the fifth didn't start it soon enough and their recover was was slower than the less than one week of the rest.

Had all 5 tested positive for covid-19? Or did they self-medicate based on symptoms they *believed* to be covid-19?

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7 minutes ago, AngusMactavish said:

I read left to right not like some that read right to farther right. Right on!

Well the first part is obvious.  I wonder if the American Journal of Medicine knows how you view them.

Feeling a little silly right now?  Maybe this will help you next time.

https://www.lifewire.com/web-search-tricks-to-know-4046148

 

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7 minutes ago, Bisbee Gal said:

Had all 5 tested positive for covid-19? Or did they self-medicate based on symptoms they *believed* to be covid-19?

Tested after recovery and all had the markers.  One had to go to the hospital to get oxygen, the one who started too late.

All had the primary symptoms, high fever, all over body pain, loss of taste and smell.  Didn't get to the dry cough stage except the one who went to the hospital.

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