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We have some friends, who own a home in Los Galapagos (now on the market) and have lived there for three years. They liked Los Galapagos a lot, small. quiet development on the lake, but are moving to another home - also out east near where we live - with a great hillside lake view and huge covered patio and to be near some friends living in the other small development called Chiramoyo. There are some nice, small, safe  developments out this way in a more rural setting. I'd look at Access Lake Chapala Rentals. We love it out here and it's only 20 minutes to Chapala, 25 to Walmart (on excellent roads!) the same or less time as when we lived in San Juan Cosala. 🦎 🌴

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It is actually spelt "Chirimoyo" and is a distressed community due to an ongoing land dispute (approx. 20 yrs.) with the Mesa Directiva of the local Village called Tlachichilco.  Good place to rent but could be problematic for purchasing property since many of the "foreigner" owned titles have been set aside on the properties in that area.  The adjacent town of San Juan Tecomatlan has been regularized but Tlachichilco has refused to move forward so far.  The locals refer to their community as "indigenous" even though there are almost no people currently living there that can trace their family history as descendants of any indigenous forbearers. 

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Is the land communal or ejidal? Communal is indigenous land recognized and granted by the Spaniards so it is indigenous or their descendent who may have become mestizo but ejidal land is redistributed land from the revolution.. can be indigenous or mestizo..

 

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8 minutes ago, bmh said:

Is the land communal or ejidal? Communal is indigenous land recognized and granted by the Spaniards so it is indigenous or their descendent who may have become mestizo but ejidal land is redistributed land from the revolution.. can be indigenous or mestizo..

 

Regardless what you call it, it will be a big can of worms for any "gringo" to consider to purchase etc. Do not be fooled by any seller or how "attractive" the deal. may sound

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Well you are off Lakeside/ Ejido land gets privatized. it happen a lot on the coast.. It still can be a problem way down the road but Communal land is even more trouble. The name does matter , even Mexicans get in trouble buying comunal land, never mind the "gringos"

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I believe it is Communal as the numerous lawsuits are filed with the Agrarian court.  The local administration over the land area is assumed by a "Mesa Directiva" and the voting at their meetings is done by "Comuneros" who are typically the eldest son of the families that have lived in the area for some time.  No women or foreigners allowed to be "Comuneros".  The local Municipality (Poncitlan in this case) does not collect Municipal taxes from the residents and as a result there is very little spent on infrastructure.

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On 1/15/2021 at 7:07 PM, bmh said:

Well you are off Lakeside/ Ejido land gets privatized. it happen a lot on the coast.. It still can be a problem way down the road but Communal land is even more trouble. The name does matter , even Mexicans get in trouble buying comunal land, never mind the "gringos"

Call it what you will, both have very grey areas.Why even consider the pits falls and ensuing problems and issues. If the deal seems to good to be true..

There have been issues in San Juan Cosala about.Ejido/Communal land. The person in question thought he was dealing with "The Official" committee only to find latter, another Representative pop's up out of the wood work to say He and his family are the Official Reprentatives...its a can of worms...but maybe you like adventure.

Believe me when I say that not all Mexicans in the Pueblos are angels and will just as easy screw their neighbors as they would you..

An other "Legal" example. You see a property say in Chapala and go to do the deal, and find out that there are say 6/7  siblings on the deed, but your contract and local family member says they have all agreed to sell it, great.

But wait... half of those people are in the USA and you can not contact them. But the deal goes ahead as the Notaria has all the signatures...Wrong a couple of those siblings in the uSA did not wish to sell nor were they consulted by the local siblings..... and will look for retribution .....did you come to Mexico for that BS?

Now I await the thousands who will post and boast "I did a deal like that OK"...great you get to keep the trophy cup

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THs is what I have to do in CHiapas to buy a truck load of s and from communal land.. One go to the asembly held by the comisaria,and his board and request a permit to buy sand. I have to go in person and the assembly starts at 7pm in a very remote area where I have to sleep on the floor in a villager´house as it i not safe to drive at night in the area.. The subject is never brought up until 9pm. Then I pay 100 pesos for the permit for a truck load of sand , then I have to show up with a permit and a truck the next day to get the sand and I have to do this every time I want sand.. I also have to show up in person... I can imgine what it would be like to buy a piece of land from that village.. First I cannot and second I would not..

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