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Excerpted from Seminario Laguna newspaper

there will be three deliveries for Jalisco, the first 32 thousand 175 doses from January 12 to 18, 26 thousand 325 from January 19 to 25 and 23 thousand 400 from January 26 to February 1, giving a total of 81 thousand 900 doses for the entity in the first half of the year.

Alfaro reiterated that he would insist on including public and private education teachers, in the first phase of vaccination, as a priority to advance the effort to return to face-to-face classes.

"This phase will be to cover the health personnel of public and private institutions, starting with those who care for patients with Covid-19, and then the rest of the medical staff. We will continue to insist on including teachers and teachers as a priority in order to advance the effort to return to face-to-face classes," the Governor of Jalisco said.

The Government of Mexico will send the vaccines according to the tentative schedule of the first phase of the National Vaccination Plan.

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Global distribution/inoculations of Covid vaccine.  From Bloomberg.  https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/covid-vaccine-tracker-global-distribution/

Mexico at the bottom per capita.  

Global Vaccination Campaign

 
Country No. of doses administered Per 100 people Last updated
Global total 18,937,946 Jan. 08
Israel 1,593,000 17.60 Jan. 07
U.A.E. 941,556 8.76 Jan. 08
Bahrain 78,291 5.28 Jan. 08
U.K. 1,488,947 2.23 Jan. 07
U.S. 7,051,842 2.15 Jan. 08
Denmark 102,092 1.76 Jan. 08
Slovenia 16,339 0.79 Jan. 08
Italy 455,203 0.75 Jan. 08
Portugal 70,000 0.68 Jan. 08
Canada 247,917 0.66 Jan. 08
Estonia 7,973 0.60 Jan. 08
Spain 277,976 0.60 Jan. 08
Germany 476,959 0.57 Jan. 08
Russia* 800,000 0.55 Jan. 02
Poland 188,956 0.50 Jan. 08
Romania 92,706 0.48 Jan. 08
Hungary 42,549 0.44 Jan. 08
Saudi Arabia 130,000 0.38 Jan. 07
Slovakia 19,727 0.36 Jan. 08
Oman 14,911 0.36 Jan. 08
Greece 34,787 0.32 Jan. 08
Norway 17,337 0.32 Jan. 08
China 4,500,000 0.32 Dec. 31
Ireland 15,314 0.31 Jan. 07
Lithuania 8,130 0.29 Jan. 07
Latvia 4,595 0.24 Jan. 07
Finland 11,135 0.20 Jan. 08
Luxembourg 1,200 0.20 Dec. 30
Croatia 7,864 0.19 Dec. 30
Czech Republic 19,918 0.19 Jan. 07
Austria 15,905 0.18 Jan. 07
Bulgaria 11,117 0.16 Jan. 08
France 80,000 0.12 Jan. 07
Argentina 39,599 0.09 Jan. 04
Chile 10,689 0.06 Jan. 08
Kuwait 2,500 0.05 Dec. 29
Costa Rica 2,455 0.05 Jan. 03
Mexico 58,402 0.05 Jan. 08
Guinea 55 0.00 Dec. 30

 

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6 hours ago, lakeside7 said:

I guess we can always try the alternative magic talisman recommend by the President

Can you please tell me where and when this talisman that will keep me safe from Covid is available? Will it cause any allergic reaction? I need to be liberated from this social distancing.

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9 minutes ago, oregontochapala said:

As hard a pill as it is to swallow,  life as we knew it before Covid is a far off dream.

Wearing masks, social distancing, washing hands and doing the daily things we do to stay healthy are the way we'll be living for a lot longer than many seem willing to accept. This is our new reality. 

If you know history you will understand pandemics have been documented before and some lasted about a year or more and then herd immunity put things back to normal in many parts of the World. This Covid-19 pandemic will be no different.

Cholera pandemics have devastated many places many times.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1881–1896_cholera_pandemic

"The fifth cholera pandemic (1881–1896) was the fifth major international outbreak of cholera in the 19th century. It spread throughout Asia and Africa, and reached parts of France, Germany, Russia, and South America. It claimed 200,000 lives in Russia between 1893 and 1894; and 90,000 in Japan between 1887 and 1889.[1][2] The 1892 outbreak in Hamburg, Germany was the only major European outbreak; about 8,600 people died in that city. Although many residents held the city government responsible for the virulence of the epidemic (leading to cholera riots in 1893), it continued with practices largely unchanged. This was the last serious European cholera outbreak of the century."

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5 hours ago, mudgirl said:

Comparing cholera and COVID is absurd. Cholera is a bacterial infection, not a virus, and is spread through consuming contaminated food and water, not coming in contact with another person who is infected.

 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7543944/#!po=8.33333

As explained in the above article:

"Taken together, before the emergence of vaccines, isolation is the best and most effective way to fight against the pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic has been a global public health event, and no country can survive alone. We need to prepare for long-term battles, emphasizing adopting strict isolation measures in severe countries, and resuming work and production without deregulation in countries where the epidemic has improved."

Taken in context it is not at all absurb, at least not to me, because pandemics whether viral or  bacterial spread through breathing in a virus or injesting a nasty bacteria has the same outcome when it is highly contagious and deadly to many. Vaccination and cures will eventually - not years but possibly 1 year - lead us back to normality through herd immunity. The World will not change to stay/become this way was my point: 

7 hours ago, oregontochapala said:

As hard a pill as it is to swallow,  life as we knew it before Covid is a far off dream.

Wearing masks, social distancing, washing hands and doing the daily things we do to stay healthy are the way we'll be living for a lot longer than many seem willing to accept. This is our new reality. 

 

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9 hours ago, mudgirl said:

Comparing cholera and COVID is absurd. Cholera is a bacterial infection, not a virus, and is spread through consuming contaminated food and water, not coming in contact with another person who is infected.

Not quite true Cholera is spread through consuming contaminated food and water. The later 2 contaminations can come from people to water/food to people

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4 hours ago, cedros said:

Not quite true Cholera is spread through consuming contaminated food and water. The later 2 contaminations can come from people to water/food to people

Duh, obviously. But you don't "catch" cholera from other people. It isn't contagious- you aren't going to get cholera from having someone who is infected with it breathe or cough on you. 

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1 hour ago, mudgirl said:

Duh, obviously. But you don't "catch" cholera from other people. It isn't contagious- you aren't going to get cholera from having someone who is infected with it breathe or cough on you. 

Of course you catch cholera from other people-just a different route-water rather than air

From Medicine.net; 

"Cholera is highly contagious. Cholera can be transferred person to person by infected fecal matter entering a mouth or by water or food contaminated with Vibrio cholerae bacteria. The organisms can survive well in salty waters and can contaminate humans and other organisms that contact or swim in the water."
 
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2 hours ago, cedros said:

Of course you catch cholera from other people-just a different route-water rather than air

Let me try to make the distinction simple for you:

Let's say my daughter, from out-of-town, wants to come visit and stay with me. On the way, she could have been exposed to COVID at the airport, in the plane, in the taxi to my house. Unless we maintain distance, and wear masks until she's been here for 14 days without showing any symptoms, and then going for a COVID test which comes back negative, I could contract the virus from her.

Now let's say that my daughter is infected with cholera instead. Unless she has fecal matter on her hands, or elsewhere on her body or clothing, which I would then have to somehow get in my mouth, I do not run a risk of contracting cholera from her, even if we kiss and hug as soon as she gets off the plane and cuddle up together on the sofa to watch movies. I couldn't even get it from drinking water out the same glass she drank out of, because it isn't transferred through saliva.

One disease is passed by direct contact between humans, and the other is passed through a vector- in the case of cholera, fecally contaminated food or water.

It's like dengue- hanging out in close quarters with someone who has dengue doesn't pose a risk- getting bitten by a mosquito who has bitten that person and then bitten you is the way it's transferred.

 

 

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Obviuosly I should have chosen a highly contagious deadly to many pandemic which was a virus. However I didn't. I chose one that over centuries killed tens/hundreds of millions of people when it popped up in different locations over about a 150 year time span.

Vaccinating populations and treatment through medicine and sanitation curved this nasty bacteria that was spreading from person to food and water to person and ALL outbreaks were stopped eventually and life went back to normal.

Covid-19 is highly contagious and deadly to some and vaccinating and medicine plus sanitation should eventually be effective and all places affected should go back to normal.

I don't see us gelling up or social distancing or wearing masks for more than a year when global herd immunity happens according to how I understand the current situation.

No need to argue because I chose one of the most devastating pandemic/s documented throughout history, Cholera. IMO

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Mudgirl you don't seem to have taken many courses in microbiology. You have it wrong. You can pick up cholera at any public place where there is water-like restaurants or washrooms or from saliva on a glass. Of course you could get cholera from your daughter if she had it and was staying with you. You can't tell by looking at somone if they have cholera or not. Both disease are passed through vectors. Cholera is often not passed by direct contact between humans. I will write no more on this as you are ovbiously ignorant of the facts.

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4 hours ago, Ferret said:

Mudgirl is saying that the bacteria Cholera vibrio is NOT AIRBORNE like Covid-19 is.

I realize that is what she is trying to say but both are contagious. I would not want to be staying in the same house as somone who had Covid or Cholera.

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5 hours ago, cedros said:

Mudgirl you don't seem to have taken many courses in microbiology. You have it wrong. You can pick up cholera at any public place where there is water-like restaurants or washrooms or from saliva on a glass. Of course you could get cholera from your daughter if she had it and was staying with you. You can't tell by looking at somone if they have cholera or not. Both disease are passed through vectors. Cholera is often not passed by direct contact between humans. I will write no more on this as you are ovbiously ignorant of the facts.

No, I don't post things without researching first, so I am not ignorant of the facts. The following is from the CDC website and is reiterated in every one of the articles I read on cholera. Also, cholera is easily treatable. So comparing it to COVID is ridiculous.

"The disease can spread rapidly in areas with inadequate treatment of sewage and drinking water. The infection is not likely to spread directly from one person to another; therefore, casual contact with an infected person is not a risk factor for becoming ill."

 

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12 hours ago, mudgirl said:

No, I don't post things without researching first, so I am not ignorant of the facts. The following is from the CDC website and is reiterated in every one of the articles I read on cholera. Also, cholera is easily treatable. So comparing it to COVID is ridiculous.

"The disease can spread rapidly in areas with inadequate treatment of sewage and drinking water. The infection is not likely to spread directly from one person to another; therefore, casual contact with an infected person is not a risk factor for becoming ill."

 

Reading the complete thread brings this image to mind. 😊

 

il_fullxfull.387844140_ggey-696x332.jpg

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2 hours ago, bmh said:

well back to COVID.. Mexico should be ashamed and so should France.. their ranking in the world is terrible..

Very True!

Great Britian news today stated they were vaccinating 200,000 per day - operating 24 hours.

Mexico news 4,100 in the day on Friday.

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18 hours ago, MtnMama said:

Sounds like our best bet is that local private clinics will buy the vaccine - hopefully AstraZenaca which is cheap - and distribute it to old people.

AMLO stated people of "tecera edad" will be getting the CanSino's Chinese vaccine, not the Pfizer vaccine for free.

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