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Voltage regulator for Telmex modem


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Several months ago, our Telmex modem completely died after a power outage.  I put it down to it being an old modem and was able to get a new one out of Telmex.  However, after another power outage (and possible surge?) last Monday morning, our new Telmex modem is getting significantly less download speed.  I mean, way down --  a reboot and reset did nothing.  I swapped it out with a friend's older modem and was able to get our previously good download on that.  So, now I'm thinking perhaps a problem with the voltage regulator could be the root of my modem problems.  I currently have an ISB Sola Basic (pic attached) and wondering if I should be looking into a better voltage regulator.  Any thoughts / suggestions on brands?

Gracias en adelantado.

20200819_130632.jpg

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1 hour ago, RickS said:

Can't address your particular voltage regulator but.... I always also have a small UPS device between the AVR and my Internet/computer equipment too.  Around $50-$75 US depending on battery size. Available locally.

 

That's an idea.  I had not thought to do that.  Thabks!

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I am using a Tripp-lite no break now. It is heavy and expensive but seems to work well.  Previously  I unplugged everything if there was a big storm and used Exceline power plugs for every device for unexpected brownouts or surges. Exceline plugs are excellent for power surges and brownouts but they are hard to come by. They were developed in Venezuela-the brown out capital of the world. Some fraccionamientos have much better electrical infrastructure and far fewer problems than others. Brownouts can cause more damage (to motors) than surges. Your modem should be protected against power surges or unplugged. 

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11 hours ago, Mostlylost said:

My Telmex modem is powered by a transformer that converts 100-240 volts AC to 22 volts DC.  Would need a very rare power surge to affect it. 

No but it can burn out your transformer.  I have used power conditioners always here and never lost anything to the voltage dance that we have here.

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I currently use a surge protector/surge strip for my computer, TV, etc. This thread has folks recommending voltage regulators, uninterruptible power supply (UPS), and power conditioners. I have limited knowledge of these different products, but would like to know if a surge protector/surge strip is adequate to protect from the voltage changes, brownouts and other electricity issues we experience here? Or, do I need a different product? Or, is there such a thing as an "all-in-one" (i.e., a combined surge protector voltage regulator, UPS and power conditioner)?

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2 hours ago, #HarryB said:

I have 2 whole house voltage regulators. Assume one for each pole. I still use multi voltage regulators for electronics. In 20 years never lost anything.

I put in two whole house voltage regulators and then was told by electricians that they don't protect against power surges-they just keep the voltage in a narrow range except for power surges. So I also put Exceline power plugs on most electronics. Many surge protector strips are unsatisfactory but the more expensive can be.

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1 hour ago, InChapala1 said:


I currently use a surge protector/surge strip for my computer, TV, etc. This thread has folks recommending voltage regulators, uninterruptible power supply (UPS), and power conditioners. I have limited knowledge of these different products, but would like to know if a surge protector/surge strip is adequate to protect from the voltage changes, brownouts and other electricity issues we experience here? Or, do I need a different product? Or, is there such a thing as an "all-in-one" (i.e., a combined surge protector voltage regulator, UPS and power conditioner)?

A surge protector protects from sudden power surges or "spikes"  It does not condition the power or protect from low voltage or "brownouts" 

The best protection is a UPS  which has a battery, and surge protector.  If the power drops or goes out the battery takes over and gives you time to shut down/ turn off the items running, or if the interruption is short returns to using the  house power. The more items connected, and longer time it will maintain power, the more expensive the UPS.  

 

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4 hours ago, lcscats said:

No but it can burn out your transformer.  I have used power conditioners always here and never lost anything to the voltage dance that we have here.

Then the spike would have to be well over 240 volts. In 20+ years I have never had a transformer power supply burn out.   

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All modems run off DC power. 

1 hour ago, RickS said:

Your Telmex modem is running off of DC power?

All modems run off DC power. You plug the transformer into an AC outlet.  The transformer drops the voltage and changes it to DC.

The vast majority of these type work with A/C voltage from 100-240 volts. That is why you can run your laptop, or charge your phone in Europe without having a different transformer, only a plug adaptor

AA transformer.JPG

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1 hour ago, Mostlylost said:

All modems run off DC power. 

All modems run off DC power. You plug the transformer into an AC outlet.  The transformer drops the voltage and changes it to DC.

The vast majority of these type work with A/C voltage from 100-240 volts. That is why you can run your laptop, or charge your phone in Europe without having a different transformer, only a plug adaptor

AA transformer.JPG

Well, yes of course. How silly of me.  

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19 hours ago, Mostlylost said:

Then the spike would have to be well over 240 volts. In 20+ years I have never had a transformer power supply burn out.   

Well you can.  They are strong but they can break depending on circumstances.  Many voltage regulators have surge protectors built into them but they are usually too small to be useful.

I use a good high quality surge protector with a rating above 500 joules (more rating more protection against higher surges) and normal voltage regulators in my house for electronics.

UPS is fine if you need it but expensive and you have to replace the batteries from time to time.  Get what you need.

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