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7 hours ago, johanson said:

Hey Gringo, I take it English isn't your first language. I want to compliment you though, you do not make that many mistakes. What you could do when you do not know what simple words mean like blanch, is to ask Mr. Google. This is what I have instructed him to tell you

Blanching is a cooking process in which a food, usually a vegetable or fruit, is scalded in boiling water, removed after a brief, timed interval, and finally plunged into iced water or placed under cold running water to halt the cooking process. Blanching foods helps reduce quality loss over time

Now you see Sn. Johanson why I try to avoid Mr. Google when I can get multiple and various answers here. Besides, here they do not mine my information and sell it to the highest bidder. Actually English IS my first language, in fact the Kings English, since I grew up and went to school on the island of Bermuda, a former British colony and now a British Overseas Territory, and was very well taught by English school masters. So there!!! 

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10 hours ago, Yo1 said:

Good tasting potatoes from a restaurant are "cooked" twice.  Once by blanching and then by frying in oil.  Same with home made hash browns.  Ever had grey kind of soggy hash browns.  Because they were raw when cooked, not cooked first then fried on the griddle.

twice cooked fries are fried twice never blanched

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1 hour ago, Upfront said:

twice cooked fries are fried twice never blanched

You obviously never worked in a restaurant.  Trying asking in a restaurant here about how they do potatoes and be enlightened.

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There are several ways to prepare the potato for french frying as discussed here.  To be able to serve the french fries quickly, we use to peel them in the morning and store them in cold water until used, this keeps them from becoming discolored.  At a later date I started  simply washing the whole potato really well than when we got an order we would cut the potato using the french potato slicer  and put them in the deep fryer.  Both practices worked well but I preferred the fresh cut french fries.  It all depends on how you like your french fries.  Blanching them gives them a different flavor and they are not as greasy as the ones I prepared.  Both are good.

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14 minutes ago, rafterbr said:

There are several ways to prepare the potato for french frying as discussed here.  To be able to serve the french fries quickly, we use to peel them in the morning and store them in cold water until used, this keeps them from becoming discolored.  At a later date I started  simply washing the whole potato really well than when we got an order we would cut the potato using the french potato slicer  and put them in the deep fryer.  Both practices worked well but I preferred the fresh cut french fries.  It all depends on how you like your french fries.  Blanching them gives them a different flavor and they are not as greasy as the ones I prepared.  Both are good.

Greasy fries are perfect. Just let them drip for about 5 minutes above your fryer. I do them skin on.

IMG_1226cb.jpg

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24 minutes ago, rafterbr said:

There are several ways to prepare the potato for french frying as discussed here.  To be able to serve the french fries quickly, we use to peel them in the morning and store them in cold water until used, this keeps them from becoming discolored.  At a later date I started  simply washing the whole potato really well than when we got an order we would cut the potato using the french potato slicer  and put them in the deep fryer.  Both practices worked well but I preferred the fresh cut french fries.  It all depends on how you like your french fries.  Blanching them gives them a different flavor and they are not as greasy as the ones I prepared.  Both are good.

I almost forgot, the most important thing to good fries is the grease you use.  I used real lard.  A little more expensive but it gives them a great flavor.  

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Real lard is also the secret to a good pie crust......and lots of other tasty things.

Baby back ribs and cornbread for lunch!

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36 minutes ago, rafterbr said:

I almost forgot, the most important thing to good fries is the grease you use.  I used real lard.  A little more expensive but it gives them a great flavor.  

Best fries I've ever had were fried in duck fat.

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8 hours ago, gringohombre said:

Now you see Sn. Johanson why I try to avoid Mr. Google when I can get multiple and various answers here. Besides, here they do not mine my information and sell it to the highest bidder. Actually English IS my first language, in fact the Kings English, since I grew up and went to school on the island of Bermuda, a former British colony and now a British Overseas Territory, and was very well taught by English school masters. So there!!! 

Chingas! You're a Bermy?

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11 minutes ago, johanson said:

Chingas! You're a Bermy?

No, an Onion...get it?....Bermuda Onion (except they do not grow them there anymore...the land is too valuable).

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It’s a four step process. Number one cut size does matter in this case ....but I’m not gonna get Into that… Number two..rinse and dry to get rid of the surface  Number three ...Blanch in  Oil    At about 325 Fahrenheit until potato is softened but not colored in order to get rid of internal water . Let the french fries cool a little. Number four ..reheat the oil to 375 F   and crisp fry...do not crowd the basket etc ...you will lower the temp of the oil .  The term blanching is also used to denote the first cook at the lower temp in professional cooking .

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The most important thing for fries is the variety of potato. Prince Edward Island russets, Idaho Russets or, in Europe, the Irish Maris Piper. None of these are obtainable or importable  in Mexico.

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I've bought russets in Mexico, but haven't seen them for a few years lakeside.

I remember in the 60's our commercial supplier had water blanched. We changed to a new supplier with oil blanched which were far better.

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Excellent burger.  Quality and sufficient sized meat patty. Housemade bun capable of holding the filling(s).  It's likely the bun contains egg which gives it greater density while not being tough!

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