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Mainecoons

Breaking News--Businesses to not reopen

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The overwhelming majority of those who die are older folks, true, but you don’t have to be old to contact and spread COVID. This has not yet run its course. I am not a fan of big government but this has to be contained. 

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The confusion and seemingly interminable extensions will just accelerate the already growing lack of credibility and compliance.  This thing is going to run its course whether the government likes it or not.  The only question is how much economic damage will these policies cause.  Already, in this state alone unemployment is probably pushing half the work force when the informal economy is factored in.  In places like PV that depend 100% on tourism, the economic damage is even worse.

 

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The part of commercial enterprise which crumbles during crisis, whether in Mexico, the U.S.A., or anywhere else in the world, including Communist economies, are typically the marginal ones. Whether they be airlines, corporoate welfare subsidised major companies, or shops in Puerto Vallarta selling tired, old, tourist crap. The businesses which succeed may offer superior custom service, well thought out product or services, and followed their financial advisors advice to keep at least three months contingency in case of war,disease, or civil unrest. It is not enough to simply put in long hours. A beach vendor in Puerto Vallarta, selling those fake wood carvings told me he inherited his vendor license, left his home everyday because his wife forced him out the door, he was lucky to sell one carving a week. His wife made much more as a cleaning lady for foreigners. That, is a waste of life. Maybe these events must happen  once in a while to reawake the entrepreneurial psyche?

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In Nature it's called 'survival of the fittest'.  Too bad it sometimes creeps into the human world too.  BUT I dare say that many/most of us on this Board have never had to face circumstances that much of the world faces in just trying to survive.... pandemic or not.

 

 

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Unless you suggest the government bail out the losers you refer to, then I would tend to agree. Darwin at his finest.

Referring to Chillin, Rick got there in front of me. Wearing your mask I assume Rick? LOL

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3 hours ago, CHILLIN said:

The part of commercial enterprise which crumbles during crisis, whether in Mexico, the U.S.A., or anywhere else in the world, including Communist economies, are typically the marginal ones. Whether they be airlines, corporoate welfare subsidised major companies, or shops in Puerto Vallarta selling tired, old, tourist crap. The businesses which succeed may offer superior custom service, well thought out product or services, and followed their financial advisors advice to keep at least three months contingency in case of war,disease, or civil unrest. It is not enough to simply put in long hours. A beach vendor in Puerto Vallarta, selling those fake wood carvings told me he inherited his vendor license, left his home everyday because his wife forced him out the door, he was lucky to sell one carving a week. His wife made much more as a cleaning lady for foreigners. That, is a waste of life. Maybe these events must happen  once in a while to reawake the entrepreneurial psyche?

I agree with you 100%.

We have made an effort to support those businesses that are busting their butts to not only survive, but to keep both their employees and their clients as safe as possible. We appreciate those that have been flexible, adding delivery or carry-out at restaurants, or posting items for sale either on a website or on facebook for sellers of various goods.

The businesses we don't support? Those that whine and bemoan the actions taken by government entities struggling to keep this virus under check, using scientific evidence on which to base their actions. If they  would but put that energy towards building a business model that works in this situation, they might find themselves better off than before.

As to those who are quick to say, "Those at risk should stay home"- under what reasoning do you think it will benefit businesses in this area, or any area for that matter, if all of us at risk stay home? I guarantee you that the money we spend in businesses that give a sh*t and are acting accordingly is not only appreciated, but necessary. 

 

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Half the people in this country make their living in the informal economy.  In Mexico, it is not marginal, it is a living for tens of millions.  A bit cavalier to just write it, and them off.

First world thinking applied to a second/third world economy by people who have the security of a steady income.  

The weather is always good in the ivory tower.  :D 

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Mexico is a young country age wise. They offer, and have funded, millions of pesos towards job training, work experience, etc. The reason you do not see many taking advantage of these generous opportunities locally is because the younger people don't want to leave their friends, family, and  Mama's free homecooking, shelter., and laundry service.

Now tell me the countries which make up the First, Second and Third World countries you refer to? Hang on folks, this might be interesting.

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2 hours ago, Mainecoons said:

Half the people in this country make their living in the informal economy.  In Mexico, it is not marginal, it is a living for tens of millions.  A bit cavalier to just write it, and them off.

First world thinking applied to a second/third world economy by people who have the security of a steady income.  

The weather is always good in the ivory tower.  :D 

No one is writing them or their needs off. Every expat I know, including those of us with no investments or "ivory tower" to sit in, is supporting at least one or two families that depend on the informal economy. In addition, most of us donate cash to numerous local organizations providing despensas and hot food to the needy, according to our financial ability to do so. Besides humans, the outpouring of help for animals has been amazing. In addition,Jalisco has its own program to provide food to the needy, as does DIF. There is nothing wrong with society providing necessary items to those in need during a crisis like this. Better those that can, provide more, rather than seek a reopening too soon. People who are hungry can find help; people on ventilators seldom recover and even younger people with "mild" cases report being so disabled they are unable to return to work.

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27 minutes ago, CHILLIN said:

Mexico is a young country age wise. They offer, and have funded, millions of pesos towards job training, work experience, etc. The reason you do not see many taking advantage of these generous opportunities locally is because the younger people don't want to leave their friends, family, and  Mama's free homecooking, shelter., and laundry service.

Now tell me the countries which make up the First, Second and Third World countries you refer to? Hang on folks, this might be interesting.

Actually Mexico is one of the top emerging nations,ranking 13th worldwide so 3rdor 2nd world does not apply. What a thing to say about well trained and educated local young persons. Your quote:don't want to leave their friends,family and mama's home cooking, shelter and laundry service. Where did you get such an insulting idea?

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I think we'll just have to agree to disagree here, Oregon.  IMO, the "crisis" is more about government over-reaction than science.  For example, the science says people are much better off outdoors in the sun and open air but government has closed all the public spaces and beaches.  The science says that keeping business interactions small is better than large crowds, but the small businesses that have one or two customers that sustain so many of our local families are shut down while the big boxes rock on. 

The science tells us this disease kills mostly the unhealthy elderly or obese.  The science is hardly settled and changing constantly.

As for ventilators, it appears the science found out those weren't such a hot idea.  Fortunately the science figured out this before they killed too many with them.

I posted a link from an expert identifying high risk versus low risk situations.  Take that and compare it to the policies being implemented here and tell me that is following the science.

The science tells us that relative to the huge numbers of people on this planet very few have died from this or other pandemics.  The science tells us that poverty and hunger kill far more. 

BTW I was speaking more to the content of Chillin's posts than yours.  Happy took care of it so I won't mention it further.

 

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18 minutes ago, oregontochapala said:

No one is writing them or their needs off. Every expat I know, including those of us with no investments or "ivory tower" to sit in, is supporting at least one or two families that depend on the informal economy. In addition, most of us donate cash to numerous local organizations providing despensas and hot food to the needy, according to our financial ability to do so. Besides humans, the outpouring of help for animals has been amazing. In addition,Jalisco has its own program to provide food to the needy, as does DIF. There is nothing wrong with society providing necessary items to those in need during a crisis like this. Better those that can, provide more, rather than seek a reopening too soon. People who are hungry can find help; people on ventilators seldom recover and even younger people with "mild" cases report being so disabled they are unable to return to work.

I'm not going to quote both you and maincoon's but you are thrashing him for something he did not say and I suggest that you read his post about the millions of poverty stricken Mexicans who form the majority of the pop. of this country and are even worse off now. Glad you are doing your best to support a few as some of us do too, including maincoons.

pedro kertesz

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36 minutes ago, happyjillin said:

Actually Mexico is one of the top emerging nations,ranking 13th worldwide so 3rdor 2nd world does not apply. What a thing to say about well trained and educated local young persons. Your quote:don't want to leave their friends,family and mama's home cooking, shelter and laundry service. Where did you get such an insulting idea?

So what if they are well trained and educated, there are no jobs here, no industry, no high technologies or software development. Nothing. They knew when they trained that they had to leave Lakeside for decent jobs. This is the same all over the world.

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42 minutes ago, Mainecoons said:

I think we'll just have to agree to disagree here, Oregon.  IMO, the "crisis" is more about government over-reaction than science.  For example, the science says people are much better off outdoors in the sun and open air but government has closed all the public spaces and beaches.  The science says that keeping business interactions small is better than large crowds, but the small businesses that have one or two customers that sustain so many of our local families are shut down while the big boxes rock on. 

The science tells us this disease kills mostly the unhealthy elderly or obese.  The science is hardly settled and changing constantly.

As for ventilators, it appears the science found out those weren't such a hot idea.  Fortunately the science figured out this before they killed too many with them.

I posted a link from an expert identifying high risk versus low risk situations.  Take that and compare it to the policies being implemented here and tell me that is following the science.

The science tells us that relative to the huge numbers of people on this planet very few have died from this or other pandemics.  The science tells us that poverty and hunger kill far more. 

BTW I was speaking more to the content of Chillin's posts than yours.  Happy took care of it so I won't mention it further.

 

Well I hope you can find some sort of solace in the fact that no one in charge of these things cares, or even reads a single word you have to say on this subject. Maybe you not used to that. I don't have any idea how  you can overcome this, sorry for your loss.

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Chillin, how do you know what people read ? What I do know is after reading your explanation on how truck air brakes work, is that you are a genius in making things up (had a commercial licence in Switzerland as well as the equivalent in Canada known as an AZ licence). 😉

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