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Mainecoons

Question for the solar guys

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Is this going to affect the installation of home solar systems?

https://mexiconewsdaily.com/news/government-increases-control-of-electricity-market/

If not, combined with exchange rates and the possibility this will make electricity even more expensive as raised in this article, I would think this would be a great time to go solar in your home.

 

 

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Mexico considers private paid energy production / producers,  to be from systems of 500 kW size, and up; which for perspective would be about 1300 panels of 385 watts each, and these programs are handled totally separately from the home and small business net metering programs.     

Agree that this could make power more $$ as Mexico has been the fortunate recipient of some of the lowest utility scale solar and wind bids, in the world, for the last number of years.....so if these become reduced or eliminated.....as you said already. 

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For those interested  (this is large commercial scale / utility scale stuff, does not affect home or business net metering).     Obviously a lot of $$ interest in this both inside and outside of Mexico.....

https://www.pv-tech.org/news/eu-canada-step-in-as-outcry-mounts-against-mexicos-block-to-renewables 

On May 15, ambassadors from Germany, France, Spain, Italy and 15 other EU countries asked to meet Mexican Energy minister Nahle to discuss concerns over the renewable restrictions that threaten a US$6.4 billion of investment in 44 ventures.  Canada sent a separate letter asking for a phone call, stating the measures risk the US$450 million of green energy investment Canadian firms such as Canadian Solar have pledged in Mexico. "This deal adds to other measures and policy changes that are contrary to renewable investment”  

Judge grants temporary block of Mexico’s renewable restrictions https://www.pv-tech.org/news/judge-grants-temporary-block-to-mexicos-renewable-restrictions-reports

A Mexico City court has provisionally suspended the reform passed by CENACE in late April. The court argued CENACE’s plan risked hampering free competition at consumer’s expense and called on both sides to make their case at May 22.  Obrador maintains that measures are necessary as the country works to contain COVID-19 cases - renewables pose risks for the “continuity of power supply”.

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What?  Someone actually admits that solar and wind can have reliability issues?  I'm shocked.  :D 

Nevertheless, I suspect this is more about using CV as an excuse to push his socialized energy agenda.  Some people can't seem to figure out why energy is so expensive in this country.

Just as long as he keeps his mitts off my solar panels... 🤣

 

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6 hours ago, Go Solar said:

Obrador maintains that measures are necessary as the country works to contain COVID-19 cases - renewables pose risks for the “continuity of power supply”.

Admits?   "claims" is more like it.....don't think PV panels and inverters are too susceptible to the virus!     😉    Nice try AMLO.     Will have to do better than that.....reliability is good and maintenance is low.    No moving parts.....just the electrons!          

A bit surprising is how he positions it.....(since you mention socialized energy agenda, this much politic is OK, right)?    …...as one might think that small scale systems, both on and off grid,  should really suit a socialists ideals and POV better than massive commercial infrastructure.     Cuba, for example, is doing a lot with small solar setups to enable power supplies to many low income homes that have not had it, before.

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OTOH these sky high electricity prices in Mexico sure make our solar panels pay off quick!  :D 

That would be fine if that was all they did but the truth of it is CFE is an economic drag of major magnitude on Mexico.  It and Pemex are big factors in the stagnant economy of this country that denies employment for so many and decent wages for all but the connected.  High and unreliable energy translates directly into lost economic opportunity. 

Mexico of all places has a tremendous advantage and potential particularly for solar.  Breaking already made deals isn't the way to realize that potential, obviously.

I'm glad to see they are catching big heat for this short sighted policy.

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Latest round goes to the solar industry....here's the update to what was previously posted / mentioned:

 
Cenace decided 23 operators of large-scale renewable energy plant will be allowed to resume test operations. The 23 companies filed “amparo” lawsuits against the grid-connection suspension, which the government justified to protect energy security throughout the Covid-19 pandemic. Amparo lawsuits are an extraordinary measure in the Mexican justice system, with no equivalent in the common law tradition. They are usually filed to request the protection of an individual’s constitutional rights.
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13 hours ago, Go Solar said:

Latest round goes to the solar industry....here's the update to what was previously posted / mentioned:

 
Cenace decided 23 operators of large-scale renewable energy plant will be allowed to resume test operations. The 23 companies filed “amparo” lawsuits against the grid-connection suspension, which the government justified to protect energy security throughout the Covid-19 pandemic. Amparo lawsuits are an extraordinary measure in the Mexican justice system, with no equivalent in the common law tradition. They are usually filed to request the protection of an individual’s constitutional rights.

But CFE is fighting back:

https://mexiconewsdaily.com/news/cfe-chief-vows-to-end-simulation-and-fraud/

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Both "sides" have valid points, for sure.     

There is a cost to having and maintaining a grid and traditional generation facilities, and a lot of value (and cost that as they say, is not being charged currently) in having CFE act as the "battery" and "bank account" in terms of tracking kWh and providing power during times w/o sun (or wind).

If all are prepared to recognize this, it should be able to be worked out amicably as again, both "sides" bring a lot of value to the equation.

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Here in Texas we are able to choose our power provider. Our electric bill has 2 parts to it:  The actual charge for the juice and a transmission charge. The latter is not that much smaller than the former. So obviously the cost of transmission is significant. As much as I disliked CFE, I'd say they have a point.

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6 hours ago, pappysmarket said:

Here in Texas we are able to choose our power provider. Our electric bill has 2 parts to it:  The actual charge for the juice and a transmission charge. The latter is not that much smaller than the former. So obviously the cost of transmission is significant. As much as I disliked CFE, I'd say they have a point.

Just out of curiosity, what does the transmission charge run?

 

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Taking the "delivery" and the "transmission" together, gives almost .04, while the power is .045, which is getting fairly typical among many US & C electric and gas utilities as infrastructure costs go up up up.

Still low cost overall at about 9 cents US per kWh, plus tax, while on the DAC level in Chapala, and including the IVA,  this # of kWh would be about 11,500 pesos or about $500 US....

 

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We pay about $.10/kwh here in the RGV.  Our bill is usually around $100/mo and everything is electric, no gas at our house. Houston is more like the bill shown above, our transmission cost is higher down here.

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I figure it is only a matter of time before CFE starts charging us for distribution and back up.  I understand a number of utilities have already or are contemplating doing the same NOB.

They do have a point.  My problem with them is the corruption and ineptitude that results in their ridiculously high rates and poor service. 

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AMLO's latest....

https://www.pv-tech.org/news/mexican-president-orders-fraud-complaints-against-solar-and-wind-firms-repo

No impact on small to medium home and business systems, this is against very large scale commercial scale (utility scale) stuff.

 

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On 5/27/2020 at 8:49 AM, Mainecoons said:

I figure it is only a matter of time before CFE starts charging us for distribution and back up.  I understand a number of utilities have already or are contemplating doing the same NOB.

They do have a point.  My problem with them is the corruption and ineptitude that results in their ridiculously high rates and poor service. 

If and when that happens we can all add one of the new "powerwall" type battery back ups & cut CFE receiving power from us at a lower cost then they can produce it. They would be stupid to do that, but what else is new.

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We're seeing more requests for both hybrid and offgrid type systems from folks who have CFE connections, and have installed quite a few with good results.

Still ain't cheap....but the tech is there already.....and pricing should follow....it almost always does!  😉

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Back in 2007 when I ordered my first panels which were rated at either 160 or 170 watts per panel, I also got 8 deep cell golf cart 6 volt batteries. And when CFE fails, I still have power provided by both the batteries and also the solar panels when the sun is out. (only the batteries at night)

When I added panels later, they were independent and connected to other circuits and these stop working when CFE fails

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The Enphase IQ8 microverter, releasing later this year, is going to be a major game changer.  Seamless on-grid/off grid transition, use from CFE only whatever storage you have doesn't give you.   Places like the Carribean and Africa, already with batteries and inverters,  and everywhere else, can get rid of the transfer switch.  

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Hybrid systems using central inverters from Outback, Darfon, and now Solis have been doing that already (no transfer switch) or will be later this month (Solis is the newest to announce) and yes, the technology will start to show up in micro-inverters as well.      Li-ion batteries are the way to go now with these,  thanks to zero maintenance, no off-gassing,  high tolerance of charge and discharge levels, and a long lifespan with stable output that actually works out more cost effectively in the long run.

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