Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

Recommended Posts

When the restaurants Lakeside open for full public use again, look for a price increase for bacon and eggs.  It will probably not be as bad as the Untied States but some flow down will occur especially through costsco, etc.   Pork processors that furnish over 25% of the pork in the United States are currently shut down due to the virus.  Iowa has called out the National Guard to help the processors.  Almost all pork in the United States is contracted for and raised by the major meat processors.  It is produced on a tight schedule from the time the pig is born until it is butchered.  With the processors unable to process the meat their is now talk a lot of the hogs may have to be euthanized and the bodies disposed of.  Major processors are now warning of a shortage of pork in the USA.  At the same time the government has now announced it will buy 100 million dollars worth of meat a month, further compounding the problem.  Grocery shelfs will be low and prices higher.  At the same time they are buying millions of eggs for the I assume vaccine development and probably making powder eggs for food distribution.  I was paying 78 cents for a dozen eggs and now it is $1.78 for the same eggs and supplies are low.

  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Different supply chain here in Mexico. Of course there the giant agri industries stomping around. But on the other hand, there is the Chapala municipal slaugterhouse, working an easy pace, butchering animals to specifications fit for human consumption. Half a block way is the carneceria, where you can purchase belly pork, smoke and cure your own bacon (hmm maple sugar and fruitwood), or buy from another whose bacon is very popular. Buy a kilo of farm fresh eggs, many picked this morning, based on the wet poop still on some of them. So this is the supply chain going back 100's of years, and 100 years yet to come.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, CHILLIN said:

Different supply chain here in Mexico. Of course there the giant agri industries stomping around. But on the other hand, there is the Chapala municipal slaugterhouse, working an easy pace, butchering animals to specifications fit for human consumption. Half a block way is the carneceria, where you can purchase belly pork, smoke and cure your own bacon (hmm maple sugar and fruitwood), or buy from another whose bacon is very popular. Buy a kilo of farm fresh eggs, many picked this morning, based on the wet poop still on some of them. So this is the supply chain going back 100's of years, and 100 years yet to come.

 This is  why I read this board!

Not to hear bickering! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I buy bacon & eggs at the Tuesday Market. Eggs (farm fresh) are 50 pesos a dozen. Can't remember how much bacon is but since the pigs are raised on the family milpa, I don't expect a shortage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, MtnMama said:

I buy bacon & eggs at the Tuesday Market. Eggs (farm fresh) are 50 pesos a dozen. Can't remember how much bacon is but since the pigs are raised on the family milpa, I don't expect a shortage.

Isn't 50 pesos roughly US $2.50?  The OP says with the price going up in their location in the US they are now paying 1.78.  I normally pay around 30  pesos or so for a dozen of farm fresh eggs, generally on the large size, at my local veggie market in centro Chapala.  But yes, we don't seem to be experiencing the shortages that they are experiencing in many parts of the US, as of yet, down here in sunny México, nor the high Coronavirus death toll, gracias a Diós.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, dichosalocura said:

The OP says with the price going up in their location in the US they are now paying 1.78.

I can pretty much assure you the eggs the OP was paying 78 cents a dozen for, before they went up in price, weren't fresh farm eggs- they were factory farm eggs with pale yolks, full of antibiotics from chickens that sit in cages they can barely move in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mudgirl, yes the person was talking about the US, things are not as fresh up there and the Agricultural people have other agendas like making money vs feeding people.  I still am shocked to read about all the food being destroyed up there because of the two tier system, grocery food vs food for restaurants and schools. With all the restaurants and schools being closed now. If the food was destined to a restaurant or a school, since they package things differently than if it were going to go to a grocery store, it must now be destroyed because it is too costly to repackage it for sale in a grocery store.  If they can´t make any money off it, better to destroy it than give it away.  Hence, they are breaking millions of eggs, pouring out millions of gallons of fresh milk and plowing over millions of acres of fresh vegetables, simply because it would be to costly to repackage them now.  Today I read an article where Tyson foods was making the claim that since they have been forced to close many of their processing plants, they must now DEPOPULATE their chickens, beef, and pork livestock from the processing plants.  I shiver to think what that could possibly even mean.  Greed is one of the worst sins known to human kind.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, MtnMama said:

Can't remember how much bacon is but since the pigs are raised on the family milpa...

It would be very unusual to raise an animal "on the family milpa".  The milpa isn't usually grazing ground.  Maybe the pigs are raised on the family farm--that's a different thing.

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, More Liana said:

It would be very unusual to raise an animal "on the family milpa".  The milpa isn't usually grazing ground.  Maybe the pigs are raised on the family farm--that's a different thing.

Yes! A real farmer doesn't let pigs roam around in  a cultivated field.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, slainte39 said:

Some people can´t their minds out of the US.

Some times we must broaden our horizons  to enjoy what we have.

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Out of sheer desperation, and in consideration of our ages, we did something that we never considered doing before this pandemic and its consequences. We ordered from Omaha Steaks two weeks ago. The filet mignons with stuffed baked potatoes, and some sirloin steaks, were actually shipped from Kansas by freezer truck, and are now heading south from Dallas. Salivation is increasing, as FedEx will deliver them tomorrow; hopefully still cold. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, happyjillin said:

Yes! A real farmer doesn't let pigs roam around in  a cultivated field.

In the US the large meat processors ran the family  pork farmers out of business.  They lowered the price of pork until the farmer could no longer make a living.  This happened about 25 years ago.  The processors than established corporate pig farms and set up the raising of pork on a finely scheduled routine.  They contracted some farmers to raise pigs and other farmers were contracted to feed the pigs to time for processing.  This has resulted in a steady continous flow of pork.  The virous has bottle necked this process and the contracted farmers and processors will be the ones losing money.  The excess hogs now being produced will probably have to be destroyed until the processors can fully open again.  There was no process established to take care of hogs once they reached their desired weight.  If it was a family farm, they could simply feed the hogs longer and let them get bigger.  I have seen bacon off hogs who were raised in Australia until they reached 500 to 600 pounds.  One slice of bacon from these hogs will do you!.

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, rafterbr said:

Some times we must broaden our horizons  to enjoy what we have.

Not when the horizon somewhere else is not the same as ours here in any shape or form for all intents and purposes HERE on the north shore of lake Chapala. It's a shame some people forget this and wander from our horizon which wandering serves no purpose whatsoever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

S

5 hours ago, happyjillin said:

Not when the horizon somewhere else is not the same as ours here in any shape or form for all intents and purposes HERE on the north shore of lake Chapala. It's a shame some people forget this and wander from our horizon which wandering serves no purpose whatsoever.

So true.    Today bought a dozen eggs in Soriana Chapala for $27.90   That's $1.16US   There were plenty available.  The vast majority of the food I buy is from Mexico. 

The price of eggs or pork or beef etc. in the USA or Canada to me is about as important as the prices in Italy, or Sweden or wherever. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Mostlylost said:

S

So true.    Today bought a dozen eggs in Soriana Chapala for $27.90   That's $1.16US   There were plenty available.  The vast majority of the food I buy is from Mexico. 

The price of eggs or pork or beef etc. in the USA or Canada to me is about as important as the prices in Italy, or Sweden or wherever. 

Exactly! We residents of this area aren't affected one iota  by what the OP posted so why post it and then more of the same.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I recall correctly when there was a shortage Mexican eggs do to a Bird flu?? Stores imported eggs from NO B

For some reason which I forget, the eggs were store in the refrigerated area of the store and you were advised to put them in a refrigerator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, lakeside7 said:

If I recall correctly when there was a shortage Mexican eggs do to a Bird flu?? Stores imported eggs from NO B

For some reason which I forget, the eggs were store in the refrigerated area of the store and you were advised to put them in a refrigerator

That was because US eggs are washed which removes the protective coating from the shell.  After washing they must be refrigerated or they will spoil.  Mexican eggs are not washed, hence, occasionally you see a little poop on the shell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Yo1 said:

That was because US eggs are washed which removes the protective coating from the shell.  After washing they must be refrigerated or they will spoil.  Mexican eggs are not washed, hence, occasionally you see a little poop on the shell.

Thanks I thought that was the reason provided

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...