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I am saying that a business is foolish to pay for advertising that cuts out and annoys a portion of potential customers when a regular Webpage does not. 

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10 minutes ago, MtnMama said:

I am saying that a business is foolish to pay for advertising that cuts out and annoys a portion of potential customers when a regular Webpage does not. 

I still do not understand the part about people who do not use Facebook being annoyed by what is on FB.

Small business people don’t have the skills to set up and keep a web page going. Neither do they have the money to pay someone to do it for them. I can not remember the last time I went to a web page.

 What businesses here are paying Facebook anything? They set up a page. People go to it. Their customers post links to it and share their posts with their Friends. 

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42 minutes ago, Xena said:

I still do not understand the part about people who do not use Facebook being annoyed by what is on FB.

People who don't use Facebook aren't annoyed about what is on Facebook, it's that it's annoying that all these businesses seem to assume that everyone uses Facebook. So if they don't have any other online presence, then they are potentially missing out on business, and those who don't use Facebook have to try to find out the business info somehow otherwise, or just forget about patronizing that business.

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I have a facebook account but it doesn't have a photo of me nor is there any activity or information on my account. I merely use it to see facebook links that others post.

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8 hours ago, Ferret said:

I have a facebook account but it doesn't have a photo of me nor is there any activity or information on my account. I merely use it to see facebook links that others post.

Yes. You don’t have to give them any info. And, if you do not add Friends or post or interact on other’s pages you are giving them nothing. A friend never belonged but her husband did. She uses his account to get on and read stuff. He has been dead five years.

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10 minutes ago, Xena said:

Yes. You don’t have to give them any info. And, if you do not add Friends or post or interact on other’s pages you are giving them nothing. A friend never belonged but her husband did. She uses his account to get on and read stuff. He has been dead five years.

Before I joined FB, I created a dummy Yahoo mail account using a phony name and info.  Used that Yahoo acct. as link to FB account with same phony name.  Don't use that Yahoo account for anything else.  

FB account set to highest security allowed, no "friends" no "contacts."  Originally created FB account so I could access restaurant FB accounts to read their menus, hours, without having FB throw a "curtain" over them making them hard to read which often happens when accessing as a non-FB user. 

Am using it FB a bit more since the virus to access Jalisco and Chapala, etc. official FB accounts so I can stay informed.  

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On 4/20/2020 at 10:28 AM, Bisbee Gal said:

What about people age 60 and over?  

I just want to point out a very great cultural difference between the Northern Cultures and Mexico.  Elderly Mexicans very rarely live alone, it is just understood that they would have someone taking care of them.  The phenomena of legions of retired couples and singles from The North living here without family is shocking to Mexican sensibilities.  They think living alone is the worst thing in the world, they can't imagine living so far from their families except for those who went North to find work.  

So here we are, many able bodied and independent elders - living "alone."  We have to make arrangements to be taken care of; it is not built into our lives.  I am able to skirt this issue because I look much younger than my age due to a healthy positive lifestyle - once very very active and strong, now, not so much.  It is also very strange to the Mexican culture that the northern elders socialize mainly with their own type, not having much contact with younger people most of whom are Spanish speaking Mexicans.  Such age segregation doesn't exist in MX, families do everything together.  The younger people naturally help out their elders who have usually raised them with much enduring affection.  

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51 minutes ago, ezpz said:

I just want to point out a very great cultural difference between the Northern Cultures and Mexico.  Elderly Mexicans very rarely live alone, it is just understood that they would have someone taking care of them.  The phenomena of legions of retired couples and singles from The North living here without family is shocking to Mexican sensibilities.  They think living alone is the worst thing in the world, they can't imagine living so far from their families except for those who went North to find work.  

So here we are, many able bodied and independent elders - living "alone."  We have to make arrangements to be taken care of; it is not built into our lives.  I am able to skirt this issue because I look much younger than my age due to a healthy positive lifestyle - once very very active and strong, now, not so much.  It is also very strange to the Mexican culture that the northern elders socialize mainly with their own type, not having much contact with younger people most of whom are Spanish speaking Mexicans.  Such age segregation doesn't exist in MX, families do everything together.  The younger people naturally help out their elders who have usually raised them with much enduring affection.  

With respect the elephant in the room is the lack of being able to speak Spanish

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1 hour ago, ezpz said:

I just want to point out a very great cultural difference between the Northern Cultures and Mexico.  Elderly Mexicans very rarely live alone, it is just understood that they would have someone taking care of them.  The phenomena of legions of retired couples and singles from The North living here without family is shocking to Mexican sensibilities.  They think living alone is the worst thing in the world, they can't imagine living so far from their families except for those who went North to find work.  

So here we are, many able bodied and independent elders - living "alone."  We have to make arrangements to be taken care of; it is not built into our lives.  I am able to skirt this issue because I look much younger than my age due to a healthy positive lifestyle - once very very active and strong, now, not so much.  It is also very strange to the Mexican culture that the northern elders socialize mainly with their own type, not having much contact with younger people most of whom are Spanish speaking Mexicans.  Such age segregation doesn't exist in MX, families do everything together.  The younger people naturally help out their elders who have usually raised them with much enduring affection.  

So very true.  Great post!

We used to be a lot more like the Mexicans.  I think WWII changed that forever.

 

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On 4/20/2020 at 5:17 PM, ComputerGuy said:

Tercera edad.

Right   Stand corrected  (not the first time) So confusing      La laguna      el lago   So the lake is both masculine and feminine??>>>  The day and the morning are masculine but the  afternoon and night are feminine  but when speaking of early morning it changes to feminine (la madrugada)....  Sometimes it it the word itself that is masculine or feminine .....sometimes it is the object .....Unfortunately there is no firm rule.  As all my relative say "es facil   solo recuerda"  as I say    Mi mente es muy vieja y yo soy un viejo  

 

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19 hours ago, lakeside7 said:

With respect the elephant in the room is the lack of being able to speak Spanish

That is an easily corrected fault, unless one is mentally handicapped or just plain lazy. So, why not get on with it?

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20 minutes ago, RVGRINGO said:

That is an easily corrected fault, unless one is mentally handicapped or just plain lazy. So, why not get on with it?

I respectfully disagree. It is not “easy” for everyone and is impossible for some. Do not accuse people you do not know of being stupid or lazy. 

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If you speak one language, you have the capability to learn others.  It certainly is not "impossible", and the degree of difficulty is related to motivation and, of course, intelligence. 

"Sí, se puede."

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16 minutes ago, Xena said:

I respectfully disagree. It is not “easy” for everyone and is impossible for some. Do not accuse people you do not know of being stupid or lazy. 

Our ability to learn a new language diminishes with age, and the hearing loss that often accompanies older age makes it more difficult.  It has nothing to do with intelligence and/or "laziness".

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10 minutes ago, gringal said:

Our ability to learn a new language diminishes with age, and the hearing loss that often accompanies older age makes it more difficult.  It has nothing to do with intelligence and/or "laziness".

Exactly.  Well known "facts".

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Just now, RVGRINGO said:

If you speak one language, you have the capability to learn others.  It certainly is not "impossible", and the degree of difficulty is related to motivation and, of course, intelligence. 

"Sí, se puede."

Whilst many foreigners   have been able to learn and speak Spanish, the other elephant in the room is that you still come from a different culture and I would suggest that speaking the same language doesn't mean that you are thinking the same. Logic for "us" is totally different for logic for "them"

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True dat. Sometimes "they" are light years ahead of "us" in logic... especially when it comes to the things that are REALLY important in life.

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14 minutes ago, gringal said:

Our ability to learn a new language diminishes with age, and the hearing loss that often accompanies older age makes it more difficult.  It has nothing to do with intelligence and/or "laziness".

Gringal I agree 100%.

I am not lazy, up at 5AM, Treasurer of a fraccionamiento and on and on.  I have a Masters degree in finance, had a scholarship, played a musical instrument professionally, not stupid or "mentally handicapped as referred to in another post".  However, I can't seem to get past chapter 5 or 6 in all instruction books regarding learning Spanish.  Been in MX full time for 22 years, so, I started when I was barely in my 40's. We all have different skill sets, we all are individuals, therefore, we shouldn't ALL be put into one category.

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10 minutes ago, ibarra said:

Gringal I agree 100%.

I am not lazy, up at 5AM, Treasurer of a fraccionamiento and on and on.  I have a Masters degree in finance, had a scholarship, played a musical instrument professionally, not stupid or "mentally handicapped as referred to in another post".  However, I can't seem to get past chapter 5 or 6 in all instruction books regarding learning Spanish.  Been in MX full time for 22 years, so, I started when I was barely in my 40's. We all have different skill sets, we all are individuals, therefore, we shouldn't ALL be put into one category.

Heh,heh.  Ever notice how some people tend to use categories to explain everything in the world?  Makes it easier.🙃 Reality gets complex. I have a special friend with a wide streak of genius who can't spell worth spit.😉

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I started studying Spanish at the age of 51 after wearing hearing aids for years. The ingredient for success of  any language is desire, but lacking that, any justification is convenient and equally valid. 

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59 minutes ago, gringal said:

Our ability to learn a new language diminishes with age, and the hearing loss that often accompanies older age makes it more difficult.  It has nothing to do with intelligence and/or "laziness".

 

44 minutes ago, happyjillin said:

Exactly.  Well known "facts".

Untrue. Scientific studies of the brain say the opposite. Of course hearing loss would play a factor, but just because you can't hear well, doesn't mean you can't learn a language visually. 

 

1 hour ago, RVGRINGO said:

the degree of difficulty is related to motivation and, of course, intelligence. 

Both of those things but also some people have a better "ear" than others and therefore learn languages more easily. Just like some people can carry a tune, even if they don't have a great singing voice, they can hit the right notes, and others are tone-deaf- they can't seem to hear when they are way off-key.

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41 minutes ago, ibarra said:

However, I can't seem to get past chapter 5 or 6 in all instruction books regarding learning Spanish. 

Perhaps learning from instruction books isn't the way you learn best. Everyone has different ways of learning that suit them- some are auditorily inclined, and can hear something and remember it. Some are visual and only remember and understand if they see it written down. Some may learn better on their own, going at their own speed, and some may learn better with an instructor. And some instructors teach in a way that makes sense to one person and not to another. I.e. there are all different kinds of learning and teaching styles.  One size doesn't fit all.

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There are lots of ways to learn. 1 is a single new word daily. A word you would use often. Repeat it all day every 10 minutes or so in your mind. In 1 year you will remember at least 365 new words. Next pick a phrase you would use commonly ..repeat the new phrase every day for a week.. In one year 52 new phrases.  Last find words you won't need to memorize. WHAT??  You already know 100s of spanish words. Words ending in ...tion ie; education, fraction, situation etc. 99% of the time are the same in spanish except they end ...cion. So you know at least 240 spanish words with that alone.. Now in one year you could have a 500+word vocabulary and 52 phrases. Every journey begins with baby steps.

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Mudgirl makes some very good points, as have severalothers.  I am not fully fluent, but Mexicans tell me that I have lost my accent, and speak well.  Of course, they are known for being generously polite to a fault!

The ear is important, as are the eyes. I am very aware of those facts, as I am rather blind and hard of hearing at my present age (82+).  Yes, the desire and motivation are extremely important, but the brain is a rather strange item.  I cannot now speak French, without it turning into Spanish, but it mysteriously returns upon being in the presence of French speakers for a few hours.  Between those two, I find that I can now understand a fair bit of Italian, which I could not do in the 1960s and 70s while married into a Sicilian family; although some Italians disown "Siciliano" as a separate language.  My always very limited Turkish is now only a collection of a few familiar words and phrases, as that language is not related to any of the others that I have used.

Admittedly, I have not put in much effort in learning any of these languages, beyond reading road signs, a few boring lessons, and trying to read newspapers, and other simply written things.  If I had more motivation and time, I would love to be fluent in several languages; maybe even a polyglot, as I envy them.  I once knew a five year old with fluency in five languages, and an elderly railroad worker who spoke and wrote thirteen languages, but not a word of English. We used French, as I knew none of the other twelve!

 

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