Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

Coronavirus, SARS, COVID-19


Recommended Posts

Thank you , it is rough especially when there is no way for the family to get together but that is live  and it is the same for many people around the world. Every one in the family and friens will lit a candle on their group on face book durng the crremation.. How weird can it get?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, The DOCTOR said:

Good news for some of you:

 

This will conclude my postings on this topic. I have raised an issue, and in two days  it has been discussed to

my satisfaction. I took the temperature of the community online here. A very diverse group, and generally speaking,

quite well informed. To those who are locked into their cynicism and name-calling habits, I wish the best for you.

You are slowly stressing yourself to the limit. It harms your body and mind. Take a breath, and as my grandmother used to say,

" Taste your words carefully before you spit them at people."  Wise words.

To those who are well informed, non-dogmatic and civil, I say good job, keep it up, cause you will live a happier life.

 

 

ADIOS for now, and hope to hear from some of you, perhaps on another posting    :)  !!

Reading this part of your post it feels like you were talking to secondary school children. Why so condescending?  😊

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, The DOCTOR said:

I am pleased that as of yesterday an on-site test for the deadly virus, developed by Abbott laboratories, has hit the market and the US will have tested 5 million people by the end of this month, just under 2 weeks. We have now tested a little over 3 million in the USA, and will begin to establish sentinel populations ( in public health we used sentinel flocks or animals), to check the prevalence of the virus in the population at large. This is good news; good public health. Some states will begin to restart some operations today and over the next week. Others will follow, monitored and controlled by data and state, local, and federal officials.

Not quite accurate. According to Forbes Magazine, "Abbott Laboratories hopes to begin rolling out its rapid diagnostic test for the Coronavirus strain COVID-19 to the general population beyond “frontline healthcare workers” in May and into June." So sometime in June hopefully a large number of people will have been tested.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucejapsen/2020/04/16/by-june-abbott-labs-rapid-coronavirus-test-to-reach-general-population/#3f0e03373e02

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, mudgirl said:

Not everyone has the same symptoms. A friend of mine had it, but never had a fever. There are more symptoms besides the ones you mention, too. A couple of nurses posted somewhere a few weeks back a symptom they saw in every one of their COVID patients, that hasn't been mentioned elsewhere- red eyes. Not the whites of the eyes, but the eyes encircled with red, as if you had applied red eye shadow to the skin all around your eyes.

Most diseases can vary as to the symptoms, depending on the patient. I had dengue a few years ago, but I never had a fever. Had chills, every bone in my body felt like it was broken, even my skin hurt to touch, and I had the classic dull headache right behind the eyes. But never had a fever and never lost my appetitie, as many dengue sufferers have reported.

And millions are asymptomatic. Some get diarrhea and i am sure some are throwing up. This drug looks really really good.    Remdesivir  I believe they found a treatment here and I hope it hits the pharmacies by July.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure how to imbed a Twitter feed, but here is the truth about amount of testing being done and amounts needed. Gives some idea of testing needed in Mexico.

Quote

Top Docs Warn America: Test Or Die
subhead: Experts Prove Trump's Kooky Reopen Plan A Recipe For Disaster https://t.co/zCOWtBNgfS

— Oliver Willis (@owillis) April 18, 2020

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And then there's experts:

https://www.vallartadaily.com/new-study-suggests-coronavirus-is-not-as-deadly-as-we-thought/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+VallartaDaily+(Headline+News+from+Puerto+Vallarta)

Long ago I remember the old saw about an "ex" being a has been and a (spurt) being a little drip of water.

I'm waiting for an expert to explain to us how people aren't going to die from having their livelihoods destroyed.  Particularly in a place where there is no safety net.  Like here.  For example:

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-children-un/u-n-warns-economic-downturn-could-kill-hundreds-of-thousands-of-children-in-2020-idUSKBN21Y2X7?fbclid=IwAR1IM0S_zMMWiv5MJxkpNSc5KvgHpY9fxhkZ379MXf4SsHKMriBaLpkUqjU

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding "the experts"...

On the subject of the test used in the Santa Clara Study, I have just spent a half an hour searching for the link where it gave the NAME of the test used. Can't find it but, at the time, I did look it up and got the pdf (which I still have) from the manufacturers website... the manufacturer is Boditech and the test is the ichroma COVID-19 ab and I cannot post the pdf here because this site will not allow me to do so.

There are quite some glaring limitations of this test including false positives due to "past or present infection with non-sars CoV-2 coronavirus strains such as coronavirus HKU1, NL63, OC43, or 229E." In other words, I would not rely on this particular test to say with certainty that you had Covid 19 antibodies. Sigh.

Hopefully, better and more specific tests for THIS and only this coronavirus are in the works.

That the lockdowns are going to create abject poverty among the already under privileged is not in doubt. You're damned if you try and protect the adults from it by damning the children who depend on those adults.

Time to step up and give whatever you can to those in need.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, Mainecoons said:

And then there's experts:

https://www.vallartadaily.com/new-study-suggests-coronavirus-is-not-as-deadly-as-we-thought/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+VallartaDaily+(Headline+News+from+Puerto+Vallarta)

Long ago I remember the old saw about an "ex" being a has been and a (spurt) being a little drip of water.

I'm waiting for an expert to explain to us how people aren't going to die from having their livelihoods destroyed.  Particularly in a place where there is no safety net.  Like here.  For example:

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-children-un/u-n-warns-economic-downturn-could-kill-hundreds-of-thousands-of-children-in-2020-idUSKBN21Y2X7?fbclid=IwAR1IM0S_zMMWiv5MJxkpNSc5KvgHpY9fxhkZ379MXf4SsHKMriBaLpkUqjU

Again the argument of economic effect versus health. Both arguments are equally valid. Yes, an economic downturn will affect many children, but then so will the death of their parents from the virus. 

Many see the problems in Wuhan, Italy, Spain, New York as “over there”. Wait until the pandemic arrives then the perspective changes. We have a chance to get ready. Let’s take it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, Ferret said:

.

Hopefully, better and more specific tests for THIS and only this coronavirus are in the works.

That the lockdowns are going to create abject poverty among the already under privileged is not in doubt. You're damned if you try and protect the adults from it by damning the children who depend on those adults.

Time to step up and give whatever you can to those in need.

Good post,unfortunately their will probably be more deaths in the economic fallout than the disease itself. Yes step up!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Mainecoons said:

 

I'm waiting for an expert to explain to us how people aren't going to die from having their livelihoods destroyed.  Particularly in a place where there is no safety net.  Like here.  For example:

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-children-un/u-n-warns-economic-downturn-could-kill-hundreds-of-thousands-of-children-in-2020-idUSKBN21Y2X7?fbclid=IwAR1IM0S_zMMWiv5MJxkpNSc5KvgHpY9fxhkZ379MXf4SsHKMriBaLpkUqjU

Yes here, where there is no safety net. Starvation death takes much longer and would be more painful than death from covid-19, I would suspect.

pedro kertesz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Mainecoons said:

I'm waiting for an expert to explain to us how people aren't going to die from having their livelihoods destroyed.  Particularly in a place where there is no safety net.  Like here.  For example:

Do you really  believe that MX will let people starve to death?     With its ample resources, food supply, and AMLO running the country?   Highly unlikely.

Better to keep everyone safe and provide for those that need it, for the short term, than have a pandemic spread like wildfire, IMHO.

  • Like 3
  • Haha 3
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, happyjillin said:

Yes here, where there is no safety net. Starvation death takes much longer and would be more painful than death from covid-19, I would suspect.

pedro kertesz

In Mexico many families have chickens in their backyards.  Some even have pigs and horses. Mexicans are closely tied to their food productions. In the US Americans are several links away from food production and any disruption affects more deeply. However US has a better developed health system. 

Covid-19 would be devastating to Mexicans who cannot rely on medications being available or affordable. Ventilators? Forget about it.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, happyjillin said:

Yes here, where there is no safety net. Starvation death takes much longer and would be more painful than death from covid-19, I would suspect.

pedro kertesz

The "safety net" here is the decency of the people setting up sources for food, for those who are deprived of their normal livlihood.  Let's recognize this and be as generous as we can.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, gringal said:

The "safety net" here is the decency of the people setting up sources for food, for those who are deprived of their normal livlihood.  Let's recognize this and be as generous as we can.

Think the whole country, pop. 126million+[macro],not just here where we are 80,000 including us and other financially sound people mas o menos[ very micro] when discussing safety net. There is none. But yes be as generous as we can here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, Jreboll said:

In Mexico many families have chickens in their backyards.  Some even have pigs and horses. Mexicans are closely tied to their food productions. In the US Americans are several links away from food production and any disruption affects more deeply. However US has a better developed health system. 

Covid-19 would be devastating to Mexicans who cannot rely on medications being available or affordable. Ventilators? Forget about it.

A few but not all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was raised on a Texas border town with relatives on both sides of the border. Mexico’s economic boom isn’t that old so those from my generation remember the endemic poverty and lack of economic opportunities that existed throughout Mexico. Mexicans are very resilient and they can face poverty resolutely. Covid-19 is another matter.  If you think poverty will devastate Mexico then you don’t know Mexico.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, gringal said:

The "safety net" here is the decency of the people setting up sources for food, for those who are deprived of their normal livlihood.  Let's recognize this and be as generous as we can.

Agree 100% on the generosity.    The "dispensa" program / concept is long standing and I believe it can and will be ramped up, for as long and wide as is needed.   Not fun, not ideal, however I don't believe people will be allowed to starve in Mexico, it has the resources and the compassion needed.

Stay safe, stay generous.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, gringal said:

I wasn't referring to the whole of Mexico, Pedro...just here, and of course other places with populations of people who have sources of income other than jobs.

BTW, I'm a mom, not a "pop"😉

"Pop." is the short form for population which was the word i was using. Not calling any moms pop.  And I was referring to the country as a whole as well as here.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mexico has a big problem, but the same is true of other places...like the U.S.A., where those living paycheck to paycheck are s.o.l. when jobs are lost.  With the jobs, the company paid health insurance disappears, and getting food stamps or any other kind of welfare is another story these days. 

Naivete is an affliction born of accepting comfort rather than reality...which is seldom comfortable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...