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It means next Monday or Tuesday, the 13th or 14th of April, specifically. And border probably means when they are allowed to import stuff.

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so after semana santa until further notice..Interesting because not everything is imported..

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yes that has to be really hurting everyone importing anything..

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35 minutes ago, bmh said:

so after semana santa until further notice..Interesting because not everything is imported..

Half the stuff in the store is imported from somewhere. And while they may have just received a CostCo shipment yesterday, how long until CostCo loses regular importation? And just maybe the sign is their generalized way of pre-answering dumb questions.

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Do they go direct from the US on everything or do they get stuff from importers in Mexico as well? Yes they get costco stuff too.. With the dollar the way it is there are going to be major prie ncreases as well and they may reach the lit of what they can charge as well..

I know that I shopped for metal beans last year and the prices are way up now. I am not sure where the iron comes from but things are going up up up , except for the gazoline of course..

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They bring things in from the Abastos where they are imported by the importers.  Look on the label to see which company in the Abastos was the one they bought from.

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You won't see those kinds of labels unless they are leaving the big bags in the aisles. So I don't know what you are referring to.

The vendors at the tianguis also bring in loads of stuff from the abastos. One reason it isn't nearly as good as it used to be for fresh stuff. You do know that fruit and veg are classed, not just by type but by size and quality. And it's a lot cheaper for someone to buy a class 4 apple than a class 1, and so you see a lot of subpar product out there now. There you will see those bags.

In fact, it was Pancho's whole schtick to hit the abastos in the wee hours of the morning to get the best stuff, especially stuff he learned that the expats wanted, to stock the originally very small fruit and veg stand.... and grew it into what you see today. Or at least what it was when he left.

Judy King has a chapter in her book about Superlake when Pancho was there. An entire chapter, that explains how they import from the US, and the trials and tribulations they face every step of the way, and the high cost of the effort. Shopping, shipping, trucks, drivers, border duties and import fees, custom labels in Spanish for everything... the list is endless and goes a long way towards explaining the high cost of a lot those things by the time they get here.

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8 hours ago, bmh said:

Do they go direct from the US on everything or do they get stuff from importers in Mexico as well? Yes they get costco stuff too.. With the dollar the way it is there are going to be major prie ncreases as well and they may reach the lit of what they can charge as well..

I know that I shopped for metal beans last year and the prices are way up now. I am not sure where the iron comes from but things are going up up up , except for the gazoline of course..

Just curious.  How do you prepare your ''metal beans''?  I would image you would have to soak them for days and days.   Heehaw!

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Ha ha  , those are the special beans for the iron stomachs.. 

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Have to admit I'm disappointed. Groceries are an "essential service" and I've shopped at Superlake for 20 years; I buy lots of local/Mexican items that remain pretty competitive, price-wise, as well as the "must have" imports. Usually decent produce too. On the whole, better performance/reliability than Walmart, where you find a product you like, buy it once and never, ever see it again. The absence of Superlake is going to be a major inconvenience for many of us in the area. Me, I'm already mourning the Asian food products I've sourced there for years when no one else carried them.  

 

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I will also be impacted in the same way as kgreenbury. I was in there last night hoping to pick up some loaves of Schleisman's Cinnamon Raisin bread. So many shelves bare and the freezers just about empty. Sad... and no raisin bread toast for me. The cashier said they were closing Monday or Tuesday.

 

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Pancho is committed to you and will remain open.

 

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Pancho also has fabulous cinnamon raisin bread in the case, but does not freeze well it crumbles when toasted 

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1 hour ago, artsnob said:

Pancho also has fabulous cinnamon raisin bread in the case, but does not freeze well it crumbles when toasted 

Is it in his bakery section?

pedro kertesz

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On 4/7/2020 at 11:54 PM, ComputerGuy said:

You won't see those kinds of labels unless they are leaving the big bags in the aisles. So I don't know what you are referring to.

The vendors at the tianguis also bring in loads of stuff from the abastos. One reason it isn't nearly as good as it used to be for fresh stuff. You do know that fruit and veg are classed, not just by type but by size and quality. And it's a lot cheaper for someone to buy a class 4 apple than a class 1, and so you see a lot of subpar product out there now. There you will see those bags.

In fact, it was Pancho's whole schtick to hit the abastos in the wee hours of the morning to get the best stuff, especially stuff he learned that the expats wanted, to stock the originally very small fruit and veg stand.... and grew it into what you see today. Or at least what it was when he left.

Judy King has a chapter in her book about Superlake when Pancho was there. An entire chapter, that explains how they import from the US, and the trials and tribulations they face every step of the way, and the high cost of the effort. Shopping, shipping, trucks, drivers, border duties and import fees, custom labels in Spanish for everything... the list is endless and goes a long way towards explaining the high cost of a lot those things by the time they get here.

The Judy King's chapter on Pancho's is no longer valid.  Every box and bag that comes across the border has to have a label that specifies the calories, etc. as well as the importer's name and address in the Abastos.  I'm surprised you never noticed.

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Did you read this chapter? Because you don't know what you are talking about. Why do you have to take issue with every piece of information presented on this board to help people?

Here is an excerpt concerning labeling products that are imported from the United States. What does the Abastos have to do with it?

" The next step is to label the load according to Mexican law NOM-51 SCFI-1994. The labels must be computer generated by the importer, in the same font style, size and color as the original label. Every case must be opened and two or three labels applied to every bag, bottle, can, or box.

The first label includes the item name, the country of origin and the weight in grams. This label must go on the front of the product. Without this label, the product cannot cross the border.The second label must list the translated ingredients of the item, the nutritional information and the name and address of the importer.The third label goes on mixes and other items that have directions for preparation which must be translated into Spanish. The law requires that this label cover the original instructions and not be placed in another location. While this creates frustration for the foreign consumers at Lakeside, the spirit of the law is to protect Mexican consumers and to avoid confusion for them."

 

And after delivery:

" The load then goes to the inspection area of the warehouse where Mexican customs checks the entire load, to ensure that all items have the required two or three translated labels, that the taxes and customs fees have all been calculated correctly and paid, and that the supplementary paperwork for all of the items in the load has been obtained from the manufacturers. One entire load, for example, was delayed at border until additional paperwork was obtained about the country of origin for a new line of chocolate bars."

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