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Corned Beef to cook

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The first references to  the production of  corned beef were in England in the early 1600 ‘s when beef was being cured with corns  ( small kernels ) of salt and saltpeter . Later factories were opened on the Irish coast to export “ corned.beef “  In actuality   salt beef was popular  in England way before that ....even being mentioned in text during the 1100’ s .Although it probably bore little or no resemblance to today’s product . It’s a shame to see  so many of the traditional  old Jewish delis closing their doors .  Present day factory produced corned beef and pastrami are pretty miserable , compared to the real thing .

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57 minutes ago, Ferret said:

Oh man, that was MEAN! I would kill for a Yitz's Deli corned beef or pastrami on rye, with double dills and slaw.

Keep your fingers crossed  that what I get here on may12 will be the real thing. I will report

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10 minutes ago, Ian Greenwood said:

The first references to  the production of  corned beef were in England in the early 1600 ‘s when beef was being cured with corns  ( small kernels ) of salt and saltpeter . Later factories were opened on the Irish coast to export “ corned.beef “  In actuality   salt beef was popular  in England way before that ....even being mentioned in text during the 1100’ s .Although it probably bore little or no resemblance to today’s product . It’s a shame to see  so many of the traditional  old Jewish delis closing their doors .  Present day factory produced corned beef and pastrami are pretty miserable , compared to the real thing .

That was just salt cured,not corned beef as we are discussing which definitely is a European Jewish thing and has no relationship nor similarity to what you suggest. Rock salt in Ireland  and England was referred to as corn when beef was brined as a preservative and canned,especially for sailing ships who had to be at sea for long periods.

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Instead of just pushing the happy jillin knows everything button...why don’t you do a little research for once....try the origins of food or Wikipedia there are dozens of food research sites.....type in origins of corned beef....voila  ..educate yourself...you can do it...! Preferably before you post .

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This article has made me hungry for it.  Is there not a restaurant lakeside who serves good corn beef.  I must admit I like it with sauerkraut and on rye.

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30 minutes ago, rafterbr said:

This article has made me hungry for it.  Is there not a restaurant lakeside who serves good corn beef.  I must admit I like it with sauerkraut and on rye.

You will know after May 12 when I make my report. I am keeping my fingers crossed.

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14 hours ago, Ian Greenwood said:

Instead of just pushing the happy jillin knows everything button...why don’t you do a little research for once....try the origins of food or Wikipedia there are dozens of food research sites.....type in origins of corned beef....voila  ..educate yourself...you can do it...! Preferably before you post .

I suggest that you take your own advice before you post, alleged super knowledgeable chef. I know corned beef on rye thanks.Have bought it and consumed it for about 48 years and I Was paid handsomely for doing professional research for a number of years as well. Way before google which contains a lot of misleading crap. You pushed YOUR "know everything button" me thinks.-SNORK!

pedro kertesz

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Yitz's closed in 2019 thanks to condo development. My fave Switzer's on Spadina is long gone. My house was on Strachan Ave. and I could walk to Kensington to shop.

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In case anyone wondered, "brisket" in Spanish is "pecho".  It's a big cut of meat; you want either the point or the flat but probably not the whole pecho..  Point cut corned beef are rounder and they generally have more marbling or fat. This is the reason why a lot of people find them to be more flavorful, tender and more juicy.  Flat cut corned beef (also called round cut), on the other hand, are leaner and easier to slice, so it looks better for presentation.

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