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JOCOTEPEC-CHAPALA HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION


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13 hours ago, Floradude said:

Perhaps a little too critical  happyjillin.  I have lived here 17 years and I totally agree with what Cedros wrote and it perfectly describes that stretch of highway.  

Yes, she saud "just west of downtown Chapala.". I'd agree that's pretty accurate.

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11 hours ago, bdlngton said:

Yes, she saud "just west of downtown Chapala.". I'd agree that's pretty accurate.

Cedros said "west of Chapala" with no mention of "downtown"  until cedros amended it after I pointed out their mistake. You can find Cedros' original in my post. Pretty slick cedros😛🤮 Yes Lourdes borders el Centro [downtown Chapala]

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18 hours ago, Willie said:

Can't imagine how they will widen the road without doing away with even more parking!!!

They are not widening it but narrowing the roadway with the useless unnecessary cyclopista. The parking problem is the lesser evil, even though it will probably bankrupt many small businesses.It will be impossible for vehicles to pull over out of the way of emergency vehicles which could be a matter of life or death.

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Because they have removed the right-side passing at every intersection, traffic now doubles up again whenever someone has to turn. So this project has effectively doubled travel time through lakeside, on top of an already monstrous problem.

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Yesterday I went into Ajijic for a meeting and lunch with a friend. The traffic getting into Ajijic and back out was astounding.  Plus, the side streets were a chaotic mess and so frustrating to navigate. I don’t know how people who must drive in that every day stay sane. From what I can see the bike lane will make everything worse. 

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1 hour ago, Mainecoons said:

What I can't figure out is why they thought they had to make the cycle path wider.

 

Exactly

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2 hours ago, Mainecoons said:

What I can't figure out is why they thought they had to make the cycle path wider.

Consider handicap scooters and adult trikes, etc.  For them to pass each other, would require about six feet of width.

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I'm pretty sure that the odds of that happening are slim to none. To even consider dedicating six or more feet of seriously necessary driving space for that potential is ludicrous. And if and when it does happen, polite society has the same rules as for people walking: wait a couple of seconds to let the other go by.

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5 hours ago, Mainecoons said:

What I can't figure out is why they thought they had to make the cycle path wider.

I thought I read that the whole shebang was a State project and (my guess!) with little input from locals....with the eventual paving of the entire route. Again my guess is that the conclusion was that it was worth putting up with a "little" congestion for a "little" while.  Anybody know different?

But in the end this too will pass....

 

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The plan includes the reconstruction of the road from Jocotepec to Chapala, conservation of roads 128, 121, 129, 191, bridges, the Libramiento de San Luis Soyotlán, health centers will be intervened to achieve a certification that allows access to Federal resources, demands on sports infrastructure will be met, lake connectivity will be favored for boats to provide this service to tourists and residents.
 
Also contemplated are the Sanitation of the Santiago River, the cycle path of Chapala, there will be a new face in concept of seawalls; the paving of streets, modernization of drainage and sewer lines, the intervention of elementary, middle and high schools.
 
To execute the actions, works and projects, there is an initial budget in 2019 of 533 million pesos, between state and federal resources. As the plan progresses, budgetary programming will be made to allocate economic resources to the established agreements.

References: 
Jalisco State Government
State governor
Enrique Alfaro Ramírez
Development Master Plan of the Ribera de Chapala Region
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2 hours ago, Mostlylost said:

The plan includes the reconstruction of the road from Jocotepec to Chapala, conservation of roads 128, 121, 129, 191, bridges, the Libramiento de San Luis Soyotlán, health centers will be intervened to achieve a certification that allows access to Federal resources, demands on sports infrastructure will be met, lake connectivity will be favored for boats to provide this service to tourists and residents.
 
Also contemplated are the Sanitation of the Santiago River, the cycle path of Chapala, there will be a new face in concept of seawalls; the paving of streets, modernization of drainage and sewer lines, the intervention of elementary, middle and high schools.
 
To execute the actions, works and projects, there is an initial budget in 2019 of 533 million pesos, between state and federal resources. As the plan progresses, budgetary programming will be made to allocate economic resources to the established agreements.

References: 
Jalisco State Government
State governor
Enrique Alfaro Ramírez
Development Master Plan of the Ribera de Chapala Region

Scary. Too much change. Is that what we came here for?

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3 hours ago, cedros said:

Scary. Too much change. Is that what we came here for?

So the area should not grow, change, seek its own future but stagnate to preserve what you (or we) came here for? How egocentric. The Mexicans are not extras in the movie of our lives. This is not our stage set. I am trying to picture Mexicans moving to a small town in the U.S. and demanding it not change or be developed in ways the Americans choose because it was not what the Mexicans came there for. How well do you think that would go over?

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58 minutes ago, Xena said:

So the area should not grow, change, seek its own future but stagnate to preserve what you (or we) came here for? How egocentric. The Mexicans are not extras in the movie of our lives. This is not our stage set. I am trying to picture Mexicans moving to a small town in the U.S. and demanding it not change or be developed in ways the Americans choose because it was not what the Mexicans came there for. How well do you think that would go over?

Yeah, and try telling young Mexicans, who are working their butts off trying to get a higher education at all the universities in GDL, many from the Chapala area, and other rural areas, that you didn´t come here for change. 

Is Mexico, GDL in particular, going to be our version of Silicon Valley, or would you rather have it be some guy in a big sombrero sleeping under a cactus plant???

GRRRRRRR !!!!!!

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58 minutes ago, Xena said:

So the area should not grow, change, seek its own future but stagnate to preserve what you (or we) came here for? How egocentric. The Mexicans are not extras in the movie of our lives. This is not our stage set. I am trying to picture Mexicans moving to a small town in the U.S. and demanding it not change or be developed in ways the Americans choose because it was not what the Mexicans came there for. How well do you think that would go over?

You are looking at it backwards.

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1 hour ago, Xena said:

So the area should not grow, change, seek its own future but stagnate to preserve what you (or we) came here for? How egocentric. The Mexicans are not extras in the movie of our lives. This is not our stage set. I am trying to picture Mexicans moving to a small town in the U.S. and demanding it not change or be developed in ways the Americans choose because it was not what the Mexicans came there for. How well do you think that would go over?

Try looking at it from everyone's view including the Mexicans. The pace of change is too much for them also. The younger Mexicans expect change but it is too much change for the older ones. It is an age thing not a nationality one. The older Mexicans remember the good old days. We are just visitors in their world-not so much a part of all of it.

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7 hours ago, Colo-Rick said:

Xena:  As Robert Heinlein once said  "When you can see the smoke from your neighbor's chimny, it is time to move to another planet."

Good luck.

I have been leaving places that no longer suit me my entire life, beginning in my 20s. I may or may not have one more big move in me. Luckily, if I do decide to leave lakeside I will know the new place can not grow and change fast enough to force me out. Nature will take care of that. I will be off on the final big adventure long before man-made change forces me to move on. There is comfort in that. 

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9 hours ago, Xena said:

So the area should not grow, change, seek its own future but stagnate to preserve what you (or we) came here for? How egocentric. The Mexicans are not extras in the movie of our lives. This is not our stage set. I am trying to picture Mexicans moving to a small town in the U.S. and demanding it not change or be developed in ways the Americans choose because it was not what the Mexicans came there for. How well do you think that would go over?

There needs to be a middle ground.  This is a really out of control situation exacerbated by  the local "pay for play."   You know things are out of hand when they start sticking an OXXO in the heart of the old village on Colon.  Actually the first real warning sign was that illegal high rise on the lake in La Floresta which was only shut down after the state court threatened the local pols with jail if they continued to ignore the court's orders.  You may notice that similar high density nightmare proposals for Chapala itself seem to quietly fade away.  Trust me, you'll never see a towering eyesore approved for the Chapala waterfront.

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Growth.... it's the same everywhere. "WE" all come to a place we find attractive and then later start complaining because "THEY" are now ruining it.  No introspection. 

Long ago I moved to a NOB place that I thought was a mecca. It was. Added 5 to the population and they have now added 7 more.  Fast forward to now and it is still nice but 4 times the population with lots of unwanted traffic. Guess who I blame for ruining my mecca?

 

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this is venting but this project is insane,with sooo many other needs of infrastructure many roads are hardly passable , open grates in roads and side walks, missing signs and traffic lights not repaired for weeks at a time and this project will have plants needing maintenance they  will soon be weeds . And the traffic mess and much less parking. I have been watching the construction in Chapala and the thickness of the bicycle path will not last a year.  I have vented  now and and do I feel better,not much. This is one of the most wasteful project I've seen in Mexico!

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