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Split pea source?

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You want the yellow split peas and you can get them at El Granero but you will have to order them. She goes into the Abastos in Guadalajara usually on Wednesdays. I ordered some for ComputerGuy and got them in a few days. Check with him because he may have some left... or at least you can ask him if they "mushed" up properly.

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While Ferret graciously got me a huge back of the split peas, I have not yet been in possession of a hambone with which to start the soup. This is the week, though.

Last time I made them, I soaked the peas overnight. I do recall some years back that some types of pea simply refused to cooperate. With this batch, I will ask Ferret once more if she used that technique or maybe just used a slow-cooker.

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12 minutes ago, ComputerGuy said:

 

Last time I made them, I soaked the peas overnight. I do recall some years back that some types of pea simply refused to cooperate. With this batch, I will ask Ferret once more if she used that technique or maybe just used a slow-cooker.

My wife used that technique but even soaked for 1 1/2 days and cooked a very long time and even putting in blender and back to cooking with no success. This was a while back and the peas did come from el Granero and Superlake. She gave up. This never happened in Alberta. I hope el Granero has sourced a different pea because we have a lot of excellent ham left overs for soup making purposes. She is going to use potato instead of pea maybe.

 

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From AllRecipes.com:

It's true, soaking peas overnight in water shortens their cooking time. But soaking isn't entirely necessary. ... Unsoaked peas take from 1 to 2 hours of simmering; soaked peas take about 40 minutes. Also, the only difference between yellow and green split peas is color.

The adventure begins...

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LOL! I can bring my own bowl.

Nevermind, I'll make my own. ;)

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The store at the northeast corner of Juarez and Cotilla behind Chapala's Mercado has two sizes of yellow and one pink in stock.

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Due to adverse weather and growing conditions different batches

and sources of dried peas and beans can have widely different cooking times . Once while cooking Cuban black beans ,I almost gave up and used canned...they took forever.

 

Lily has the right idea  baking soda during the soaking and cooking process will help .Thats the reason hummus and British mushy peas become so soft and creamy .

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Doing my peas today. Found this on finecooking.com:

The warmer the water, the faster the bean absorbs it. This principle has led to the “quick-soak” method of softening. Rinse the beans several times and discard any “floaters.” Then, in a large pot, cover the beans with 4 cups of water for each cup of beans. Bring the water to a boil, reduce the heat and keep at a low simmer for 2 to 10 minutes. Turn off the heat, cover, and let stand for an hour.

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I am a bit confused, with conflicting advice, as to if you can use an instant pressure cooker for peas and legumes. My main use is cooking India lentil recipes using black lentils or split yellow. This is sort an India split pea soup, highly spiced and highly delicious. It is sometimes called sambar, or urid dhal. A person familiar with this extremely popular vegan dish and owner of an instant pot told me that the legumes would clog the pressure filter, and I should just use slow cook. Any tips?

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21 hours ago, ComputerGuy said:

Doing my peas today. Found this on finecooking.com:

The warmer the water, the faster the bean absorbs it. This principle has led to the “quick-soak” method of softening. Rinse the beans several times and discard any “floaters.” Then, in a large pot, cover the beans with 4 cups of water for each cup of beans. Bring the water to a boil, reduce the heat and keep at a low simmer for 2 to 10 minutes. Turn off the heat, cover, and let stand for an hour.

How did they turn out?

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Sadly, and sorry Ferret, but only the cascaras got soft. The beans stayed pellet hard. So I waited too long to use them. I will pick up some new ones this week, because the hambone has already given up its life for the broth.

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If you haven't thrown out the pellets, drop 'em over and I'll see how the Instant Pot does with them. Worth an experiment.

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After boiling them and letting them soak, with baking soda, for almost 24 hours, I don't think you'll have much luck.

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Went to El Granero today and they had none; boss lady returns on Thursday, so will ask then.

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