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Mainecoons

Way to go, Mexico!

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Whoops.  Was just posted on Facebook.  Wonder what happened?

Badly needed, that is for sure.  Flying really sucks these days, these airlines know they can abuse you with few limits since there is no other way to travel long distances.

 

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32 minutes ago, Mainecoons said:

Whoops.  Was just posted on Facebook.  Wonder what happened?

Badly needed, that is for sure.  Flying really sucks these days, these airlines know they can abuse you with few limits since there is no other way to travel long distances.

 

Travel long distances other ways?  Well, not as speedily, but somehow most of our ancestors made it to the shores of this continent from elsewhere.  I wouldn't mind good train transportation like in the old days when it was slower paced, but much more relaxing...and the food was better!

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11 hours ago, slainte39 said:

Do you think that a lot of non native American ancestry arrived by ships at sea ?   :D

You THINK?? Mine did, for sure.  Did yours swim?😉

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How many generations does it take to make one a "native"?

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39 minutes ago, RVGRINGO said:

How many generations does it take to make one a "native"?

Unless anyone wants to pick nits, it appears that it's anyone who was already here when the first batch of Europeans arrived.

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Th

Quote

The good old days of train travelling are over. There are a few luxury trains where you can still do it but those are tourist trains.. the rest  have snack bars and pretty lousy food. I travelled overnight in France last year and the times where you would be served a nice dejeuner are over.. It is snack bar food period.. I miss the good old days..

 

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Yes!  I still recall a pullman trip halfway across the USA, with comfortable seats, doilies on the headrests, efficient porters and the luxurious dining car, with full linens, silverware and rather elegant service. At night, our cabin was converted for sleeping and the crisp linens turned down. It was 1942.  I have only had a few train trips since then, and they were not memorable, but at five I was probably more impressionable.

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In the 6'´s they still had trains woth little lampswith lamp shafdes in England and dining car n the 70´s between Birmongham and New York but in the last 20 years I havenot seen a decent dining car or private travelling quater with bed and bathroom..I have been in the couchettes where you can sleep but you are piled up like sardines and the dining cars have been replaced by snack bar.

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I had really hoped that by 2020, we would all just get "beamed" wherever we wanted to go. Things are going backwards instead of forwards. Travel, these days, sucks. BIGLY.

edited to add: just read this about overnight train travel in Europe. THIS is a backwards motion that I am for...

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/other/the-nightjet-a-train-companys-big-bet-on-travelers-who-take-it-slow/ar-BBYhpSv

 

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Just  think how the trains ruined everything. Remember it was a full days journey by carriage to Chapala from Guadalajara. You could enjoy the countryside.  Then came the train and it was only 2 hours. Awful... 

Oh wait... Better yet our Aztec ancestors say the Spanish ruined everything with their horses and carriages. Better to make the journey by foot. Camp at night, cook a couple of the chihuahuas for dinner, sleep under the stars. Those were the days we all miss....... 

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One of my most enjoyable trips was from Old Forge, NY to Saranac Lake, NY, and I had to paddle most of the way, and carry for some of the way. It took a whole week.

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20 minutes ago, RVGRINGO said:

One of my most enjoyable trips was from Old Forge, NY to Saranac Lake, NY, and I had to paddle most of the way, and carry for some of the way. It took a whole week.

RV, I have a cousin who lives in Saranac Lake...full time no less. The Adirondacks are God's country but way too cold in the winter for us. My grandfather lived in Hoffmeister, NY, ahem, a SMALL community. He was the Postmaster, Justice of the Peace and Game Warden. How were the black flies on your trip? 

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In 1982, I traveled by Élite bus from home (Tijuana) to Nogales, México, by train from Nogales to Guadalajara, and by second class bus from Guadalajara to Uruapan.  When we arrived in Uruapan--at about 2AM--we had to sit in the bus station and wait for the first bus out to our final destination, Tancítaro, Michoacán.  The 26 kilometer bus trip from Uruapan to Tancítaro took 3 hours on an unpaved switchback-heavy road up the mountain--and the total time for the entire trip was 52 hours.  I loved every minute of it, including the women who climbed on board the train in the stations to sell home-made food, the teenagers selling candy, the men selling soft drinks.  It was an overnight trip on the train and we didn't have sleepers, but we didn't care at all.  We were traveling and having a marvelous time.  For me, those were indeed the good old days.  But you know what?  These days now are also the good old days.

Feliz Navidad, group.  

Tianguis Farolitos Navideños.jpg

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Woodsman's Fly Dope seemed to keep the blackflies at bay, Pappy. I don't recall suffering from them too much.  I have actually made that 80 mile paddle up the Fulton Lakes Chain a few times. It was beautiful.  Unfortunately, the Interstate 87 gave access to the Adirondacks to city people, who arrived with guns for protection, and proceeded to destroy the trails and lean-to shelters for firewood. Many got lost and some died. Few realized that hiking in sneakers and shorts was not a good idea. Forest rangers had to close some trails, alternate others, and were forced to eliminate many shelters entirely.  I left the area in the 1960's, but still have a few friends & family "up north".

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