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1 hour ago, AngusMactavish said:

They referenced is a Gulf Coast salt water fish.

Cynoscion nebulosus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cynoscion nebulosus, the spotted seatrout, also known as speckled trout, is a common estuarine fish found in the southern United States along coasts of Gulf of Mexico and the coastal Atlantic Ocean from Maryland to Florida. While most of these fish are caught on shallow, grassy flats, spotted seatrout reside in virtually any inshore waters, from the surf of outside islands to far up coastal rivers, where they often come for shelter during cold weather. Contrary to its name, the spotted seatrout is not a member of the trout family (Salmonidae), but of the drum family (Sciaenidae). It is popular for commercial and especially recreational fishing in coastal waters of the southeastern United States. Adults reach 19-32 inches in length and 3-15 pounds in weight.
 
 
Cynoscion nebulosus
Spotted seatrout fish cynoscion nebulosus.jpg
Scientific classification

Google is obviously not your friend in this instance providing you with info on a misnamed fish. What I said about brook/speckled trout is based on pure unadulterated experience. I almost forgot another name for them is square tail. here is a pic of brook/speckled/square tail trout which is actually a char that I  caught in the Caledon Hills a bit north of Toronto about 45 years ago. Might I suggest that you don't bother to contradict a trout [and other species] vastly experienced fisherperson when you clearly have no experience.

brook trout.jpg

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The saltwater trout sold in Florida and commonly called a "speckled trout" is not imported from Canada or any cold water source. They are a regular catch in the bays. I know nothing about the fish you speak about but know plenty about Florida's trout.

 

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4 minutes ago, AngusMactavish said:

The saltwater trout sold in Florida and commonly called a "speckled trout" is not imported from Canada or any cold water source. They are a regular catch in the bays. I know nothing about the fish you speak about but know plenty about Florida's trout.

 

Your alleged trout in Florida is not a trout according to google sources which you've been using.I also stated that the speckled trout I speak of is not a trout either but a char as are lake trout,dollyvarden/bull trout, arctic char and the hybrid splake which are all cold water fish.

 

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Nobody eats more salmon than me when on Vancouver Island. We usually buy it from natives. But I like the "Steelhead" I am getting from Costco better.

Steelhead is not a real salmon even if people call it salmon.  Steelhead starts its life out as a Rainbow Trout. If the Rainbow Trout migrates to the ocean, it becomes a Steelhead. There was always a hot debate if steelhead is a salmon or trout. I think it has settled right now that It belongs to the same species as rainbow trout — Oncorhynchus mykiss — but it acts a whole lot like a salmon.

In any case it is a good eating.

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Islander said:

Nobody eats more salmon than me when on Vancouver Island. We usually buy it from natives. But I like the "Steelhead" I am getting from Costco better.

Steelhead is not a real salmon even if people call it salmon.  Steelhead starts its life out as a Rainbow Trout. If the Rainbow Trout migrates to the ocean, it becomes a Steelhead. There was always a hot debate if steelhead is a salmon or trout. I think it has settled right now that It belongs to the same species as rainbow trout — Oncorhynchus mykiss — but it acts a whole lot like a salmon.

In any case it is a good eating.

 

 

 

Steelhead is the name given to sea run "Rainbow trout" period. There is no hot debate. They originated on the northern Pacific coast of Canada and the USA and have been planted all over the world in similar habitat. Freshwater run Rainbow as far as eating is concerned are the same and they are both commercially farmed. If you are buying at Costco,you are eating farmed trout.

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2 hours ago, Kyle said:

Is the Alaskan Sockeye salmon I get at Costco farm raised ?  Please say no

No! Costco works with Trident Seafoods. I grew up in the Pacific NW, even fished in Alaska one summer. That sockeye is NOT farmed. 

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9 hours ago, happyjillin said:

Steelhead is the name given to sea run "Rainbow trout" period. There is no hot debate. They originated on the northern Pacific coast of Canada and the USA and have been planted all over the world in similar habitat. Freshwater run Rainbow as far as eating is concerned are the same and they are both commercially farmed. If you are buying at Costco,you are eating farmed trout.

No, not a farmed trout, it is Steelhead. Much bigger than rainbow trout.
Stores cannot get away naming the spieces what ever they want in Canada without consequence.
The "hot dabate" was about the genetic evidence of this fish .
The steelhead has been bouncing between the salmon and trout categories for years.
Until last year a website from Fisheries and Oceans Canada describing them as a type of Pacific salmon.
This year the salmon sheet describing all different varieties does not have steelhead listed any more.
Science changed the family tree but in other parts of the world they still relate them to Pacific salmon.

Correct info on Steelhead here:

https://www.psf.ca/species-lifecycle/steelhead

 

 

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7 hours ago, Islander said:


Stores cannot get away naming the spieces what ever they want in Canada without consequence.

That's the theory, isn't it? But it is not the reality.

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7 hours ago, Islander said:

No, not a farmed trout, it is Steelhead. Much bigger than rainbow trout.
Stores cannot get away naming the spieces what ever they want in Canada without consequence.
The "hot dabate" was about the genetic evidence of this fish .
The steelhead has been bouncing between the salmon and trout categories for years.
Until last year a website from Fisheries and Oceans Canada describing them as a type of Pacific salmon.
This year the salmon sheet describing all different varieties does not have steelhead listed any more.
Science changed the family tree but in other parts of the world they still relate them to Pacific salmon.

Correct info on Steelhead here:

https://www.psf.ca/species-lifecycle/steelhead

 

 

I'll put up my experience of many years as a fisher person against your lack of knowledge and dredging up inaccurate news links. I repeat,the steelhead is merely the sea run version of the rainbow trout. Another fact for you to digest is that sea run brook trout also are more silvery than there landlocked versions and I know this because I have caught them in the James Bay watershed. Steel head rainbows are farmed in or near the ocean the Pacific or Atlantic oceans on this continent and landlocked rainbows are farmed in freshwater.

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1 hour ago, happyjillin said:

I'll put up my experience of many years as a fisher person against your lack of knowledge and dredging up inaccurate news links. I repeat,the steelhead is merely the sea run version of the rainbow trout. Another fact for you to digest is that sea run brook trout also are more silvery than there landlocked versions and I know this because I have caught them in the James Bay watershed. Steel head rainbows are farmed in or near the ocean the Pacific or Atlantic oceans on this continent and landlocked rainbows are farmed in freshwater.

You are funny sometimes. You are not saying anything different  about the steelhead than me or the "inaccurate " Pacific salmon foundation" website which link I've provided. No new wisdom there....  except that you fish and therefore you know it all . Do not get shocked but many other people fish too... especially when they live in the community where fishing is a way of life.

Calling  an official a Pacific Salmon Foundation an inaccurate news link ...LOL. That is little shallow...do not you think?

I just wanted to let people who love to eat salmon to know that the Steelhead is very  good eating (less fat than salmon) that's all  .

Sorry all your salmon lovers for this link being hijacked by silly argument. Nothing else for me to say.

.

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3 hours ago, ComputerGuy said:

That's the theory, isn't it? But it is not the reality.

A company such Costco would not risk being sued or lose their solid reputation in Canada.

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1 minute ago, Islander said:

You are funny sometimes. You are not saying anything different  about the steelhead than me or the "inaccurate " Pacific salmon foundation" website which link I've provided. No new wisdom there....  except that you fish and therefore you know it all . Do not get shocked but many other people fish too... especially when they live in the community where fishing is a way of life.

Calling  an official a Pacific Salmon Foundation an inaccurate news link ...LOL. That is little shallow...do not you think?

I just wanted to let people who love to eat salmon to know that the Steelhead is very  good eating (less fat than salmon) that's all  .

Sorry all your salmon lovers for this link being hijacked by silly argument. Nothing else for me to say.

.

Continue to fool yourself as a non fisherperson but I hope nobody else will be by your posts. Back to the Mazamitla hatchery info thanks to bisbee gal. I have only fished in the wild but I think I'll try there.

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48 minutes ago, Islander said:

A company such Costco would not risk being sued or lose their solid reputation in Canada.

You specify CostCo, a single avenue for sales. That's not helpful or even fair, as there are literally thousands of places that sell fish, and reports every single year indicate a huge percentage of wrongly-named or re-named fish being sold at restuarants, wholesalers, and retailers. Not only that, I'll bet a little searching would turn up news that indeed CostCo has been found guilty at one time or another of doing just that. In fact, they may not even have known it at the time.

Here's a report from the University of Guelph, February of this year (2019) that details how 32 percent is mislabelled. In Canada alone. We know it's much worse in the U.S. And it is rampant here in Mexico.

 

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The best tasting fish, without a doubt, the Kokanee. A landlocked, freshwater sockeye salmon. Hard to hook because they have small mouths. Also unrelated, Kokanee beer, which goes well with freshly fried Kokanee. Good memories fishing for Steelhead on the Copper river.  They stay deep in the pools, and rise for baits/lures in an explosion of silver. Was also only a short bicycle ride from the exact spot on the Skeena river (a deep, hidden boulder) where a Chinook Salmon, 93.5 lbs was landed. Very common in those days for a reel to run out of line(typically 30 lb test), while the Chinook bull dozed through the river. The worst part was that you couldn't do catch and release for fish this large, it required one or two gaffes. Then the remote lakes, where you could catch 100's of trout a day, on just a piece of tin foil. Then the population would cull itself with an infection of internal worms.

 

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For everybody who love salmon (or is a foodie) : Come to Cowichan Bay on Vancouver Island for holiday.
We are a culinary region and there is enough salmon in our Bay to be enjoyed.
This picture is of commercial salmon fishing just as seen from our deck.
Some season (not every year) they open 3-4 days for commercial guys and they fish day and night. This was for coho run.

1356357895_commercialfishingfromdeck.thumb.jpg.83bb07113ecbe0e4499642fdd70015ba.jpg

 

detail

468369316_commercialfishing--.thumb.jpg.93c69c427495d7fa4ed9694fa4265259.jpg
 

There will be no argument that your fish is mahi-mahi (or what so ever) you get it either from the fishing boat or catch it yourself.

Beside fish and shellfish you can get fresh almost everything from the little farms around, from vegetables to poultry.

There are not very many "high" end restaurants in the valley, just plain good eating. Most wineries around  have small restaurants.

One reason (from many others) we love Ajijic is that we can source most of the food fresh too ... and  enjoy it the great weather while Cowichan Bay is grey, rainy and miserable..

Cheers

 

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Jerry Mundel and his lovely wife Linda took me to Teocintle Maiz on Constitucion to celebrate the publication of his book, Eating Out in Ajijic. I had the baked trout with veg, in foil. It was excellent. I have no idea what kind of trout. It may have been mentioned on the menu board; I don't recall. It didn't matter: it was a lovely reddish, firm fish. Delicious. So, one more place to try.

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