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Best fish'n'chips of my life today at LaPacena!


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2 hours ago, gringohombre said:

I must admit that I was a little skeptical, but finally got around to giving it a try...WOW...THE REAL DEAL!!! 

4 rounded strips, each about 4" - 5" long and 1"+ diameter, coating crisp but not too thick. Inside flakey white fish cooked perfectly. Size great for finger food dipping in the very good tarter sauce and of course the real "fish and chip" vinegar to give it the final touch. Chips served in separate basket are very thin but crispy as I like it. Do not like fat chips with mushy interior. My new "go to" fish n' chip spot that has the real "fish shack" ambiance also.

Malt vinegar which is made from beer if it's real.

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The "best fish and chips" I´ve had in Mexico over a hundred years in Mexico doesn´t even come close to being as good as the worst fish  and chips I´ve had in Ireland. To start with……...where´s t

Ah yes, the old brassiere burger at the Diarrhea Queen. Where I lived the Chinese restaurants did a booming trade making "chips" with gravy.

" What about faggots, peas and chips - they always seemed to served as a triple." PLEASE...lets be Politically Correct here!

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Ironically, all the places in Canada that served chips when I was a kid used white vinegar. School days, hitting a Dairy Queen for lunch, we might have been able to afford a single plate of chips... we'd eat them and then just mix vinegar and salt on the plate and dip our fingers in it to pretend.

There were no fish'n'chips shops really, in those days.

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1 hour ago, ComputerGuy said:

Ironically, all the places in Canada that served chips when I was a kid used white vinegar. School days, hitting a Dairy Queen for lunch, we might have been able to afford a single plate of chips... we'd eat them and then just mix vinegar and salt on the plate and dip our fingers in it to pretend.

There were no fish'n'chips shops really, in those days.

Ah yes, the old brassiere burger at the Diarrhea Queen.

Where I lived the Chinese restaurants did a booming trade making "chips" with gravy.

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OK, so I think that the best fish and chips I had was in a pub in the borough of Leith Scotland.Teuchters Landing. Oh what a night.  Good food, good beer and great people. 

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Teuchters+Landing/@55.9773176,-3.1710281,19.5z/data=!4m13!1m7!3m6!1s0x4861e2c403f2a19f:0xe7c1fad809c30714!2sScotland,+UK!3b1!8m2!3d56.4906712!4d-4.2026458!3m4!1s0x0:0xfea3469ed190c678!8m2!3d55.9774693!4d-3.1713826DSCN1596.thumb.JPG.945cf6c2f56caf14a76acd24499ea23b.JPG

 

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One: most Brits I know don't even like mushy peas (my own lady being one). Two: Peas pictured by Halfglass are not "mushy". I think it's one of those weird cross-cultural things, like they don't really celebrate St. Patrick's day in Ireland, and Mexico doesn't really care about cinqo de Mayo.

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44 minutes ago, ComputerGuy said:

One: most Brits I know don't even like mushy peas (my own lady being one). Two: Peas pictured by Halfglass are not "mushy". I think it's one of those weird cross-cultural things, like they don't really celebrate St. Patrick's day in Ireland, and Mexico doesn't really care about cinqo de Mayo.

But but Mr. Greenwood is a renowned chef who knows everything there is to know about food no matter what the culture.

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 They are sorta ...an acquired taste ,maybe it’s the sweetness and the vinegar combo , could also be their “ lovely “ iridescent green mush “ appearance. That’s how England used to cook most of its veggies. Personally I only miss them until I taste them .

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Peas grow well in the English climate and are served with most meals.  I don't remember getting them with my fish and chips though.  Good memories of getting great fish and chips all over the country.  Fish and chips and an English breakfast were highlights of my tour there.  Most other English meals, I didn't much care for.

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 Unhappyjillin.....save yourself some precious time  , look up  “ mushy peas “ on Wikipedia...go on ...you can do it...but be prepared to eat your words , as well as a little  bit of sh..t  .As for my food knowledge you are correct..it’s a matter of education , exposure and experience not B . S . I also lived in the U K for over twenty years .

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Being a brit, ian and carnivore are both correct.

Mushy peas tend to be more popular in the Midlands upwards to the border.

Those peas in the photos are fresh peas, but no doubt frozen.

Cod, Those fisn n chips in the photos look great.

Hard to find these days from an authentic chippy and restaurants and pubs seem to be best plaice for them.

We used to haddock it all way back when. Newspaper wrapping, scraps, fishcakes ,patties. dandelion and burdock to flush it down  and in scotland fried mars bar , a bread roll,and irn brew.plus a picked egg.

 

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Even in the North of England traditional chippies are not the easiest thing to find . However ,just a short drive from my hometown is the oldest continually operating chippy in Britain . It has been operational since 1865 .Barcelonaman...I’d forgotten about  “ scraps and bits “ As kids when we couldn’t afford fish we would ask for a bag of bits  , which were the scraps of fried batter that fell off the fish . Soo  healthy we would scatter the bits over the chips and douse it with malt vinegar and of course ..eat it with our fingers out of newspaper.

 

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In Canada where immigration has always been (and will always be) significant factor in the development of the country, the availability of products from the United Kingdom, the original home for many Canadian citizens today,  the availability of boxes of dried Marrowfat Peas was expected and not difficult to find..  We've never had a problem in obtaining the product and have, in years since, found the easily identifiable boxes in Florida, New York State and Arizona.  We have not actually looked lately, but on Thursday when we visit La Casita on Terranova in Providencia/Guadalajara,  we'll take a look.  Unless you have the "real deal" there is no other true way of obtaining anything close to a true dish of  "Mushy Peas" at least that we know of.  Many Canadian grocery stores always had the product.  If you have Canadian friends who'll arrive here soon and ask if they can bring you something worthwhile, then forget about asking for: a Shaw t.v. receiver or more "accommodating bed mate" and simply ask them to pick up a couple (or more) boxes of dried Marrowfat peas.  Could change your life and initiate a more meaningful appreciation of all that you've been missing!  Oh, and before I forget....Canada would be at a sorrowful loss without the contributions of their Polish immigrants.  Who on earth could really enjoy life without Polish Sausage, Perogi (Polish Dumplings), Rosói (Broth/Chicken broth), Golgbki (Cabbage Roll) or Polskie nalésniki (Polish Pancakes).

As a matter of fact, why do we see so many posts by those who are concerned about why they can't get a certain food item here in Mexico from elsewhere easily?  Why, because it's Mexico with it's abundance of  offerings from a whole new and exciting world of food............food that has a far more developed history than in many other countries.

We who live here are incredibly blessed and lucky!

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Back to the original post... We ate there today for the first time.  We both had Fish and Chips.  We couldn't find it at first on the menu but, that is because we were looking in the wrong place.  Fish and Chips is listed as an appetizer for 120 pesos.  The order came with 4 pieces of fish, rectangle, about 4 inches long by about 1 inch wide.  It also came with a lot of french fries, too many actually.  We both had enough to eat but decided to splurge and split a brownie with vanilla ice cream.  It was delicious.  We think they may be using Ghiradelli Brownie Mix from Costco.  We will being going back soon~

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Yes, its a triple whammy here in Mexico. Good tasting, firm fish is hard to find. Marrowfat peas are hard to find, but they were revelation to me when I put on some British mint sauce (tea, sugar and mint leaves). But biggest whammy, according to a friend who wanted to open a chippie in Puerto Vallarta, is that the varieties of potato used in Europe, the U.K. or Ireland are not available at any price. He told me the name of the variety he used in Canada, but the name is long forgotten.

What about faggots, peas and chips - they always seemed to served as a triple.

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I couldn't have squeezed another thing in my suitcase last week in Canada but this discussion of Marrofat (mushy) peas has me salivating. I was born in Newton-le-Willows which is half way between Liverpool and Manchester. Mushy peas always came with the fish and chips and we enjoyed them many times while visiting. Wrapped in newspaper and doused with malt vinegar. Yummmmmm!

Why so many Brits live as long as they do constantly amazes me.

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2 hours ago, CHILLIN said:

Yes, its a triple whammy here in Mexico. Good tasting, firm fish is hard to find. Marrowfat peas are hard to find, but they were revelation to me when I put on some British mint sauce (tea, sugar and mint leaves). But biggest whammy, according to a friend who wanted to open a chippie in Puerto Vallarta, is that the varieties of potato used in Europe, the U.K. or Ireland are not available at any price. He told me the name of the variety he used in Canada, but the name is long forgotten.

What about faggots, peas and chips - they always seemed to served as a triple.

" What about faggots, peas and chips - they always seemed to served as a triple."

PLEASE...lets be Politically Correct here!

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13 minutes ago, gringohombre said:

" What about faggots, peas and chips - they always seemed to served as a triple."

PLEASE...lets be Politically Correct here!

faggot noun (FOOD)

[ C usually plural ] UK

a ball of meat mixed with bread and herbs, fried or cooked in sauce

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