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Potential Deportation of US Citizens Living Illegally in Rosarito

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https://www.sandiegored.com/es/noticias/178081/Deportaran-a-los-estadounidenses-que-vivan-ilegalmente-en-Rosarito

Although US citizens living illegally in Rosarito are easy targets, I suspect that there is potential for this to spread elsewhere in Mexico, particularly to high-density areas where US expats live.  My opinion only.  

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Around Chapala,  Migración hardly even check work permits of foreigners like they used to,  and even less their legal estancia.

Mostly older, retired folks here, and not a lot of young foreigners, lile beach towns.

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there are so many illegals here. The gov should round them up and put them in a concentration camp!

 

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30 minutes ago, HarryB said:

there are so many illegals here. The gov should round them up and put them in a concentration camp!

 

Having a bad day Harry?

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9 hours ago, slainte39 said:

Around Chapala,  Migración hardly even check work permits of foreigners like they used to,  and even less their legal estancia.

Mostly older, retired folks here, and not a lot of young foreigners, lile beach towns.

In general, the expat population living in Rosarito is retired foreigners.  A younger population--and not usually from the US--is at Riviera Maya and at Riviera Nayarit. This new wrinkle comes from the head of INM in Baja California. 

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No, I think that the horror at the border should be reacted to by Mexico. Perhaps if mexico started treating americans the same way, Trump and congress would do something humane. BTW Immigration judges are doing hearings in under a minute.

 

 

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If you read Baja forums like Baja Nomad, you find that there seem to be a lot of folks from the US (and maybe Canada) there who are constantly espousing and bragging about an attitude that makes it evident that they don't think they need to follow any immigration or customs laws, brag about what they snuck through the border, and generally seem to view Baja as just a warmer part of the US. A large contingent of them think it's perfectly fine for them to drive all over the beach and the desert with their ATVs and motorcycles and 4x4s, as if that environment is their own personal playground. 

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Rosarito has a lot of working age foreigners who cross into California for their jobs; no way most could afford to live on or near a Southern California beach, but they can in Rosarito.  Ensenada, farther south, is more retiree oriented with newer gated communities and many golf courses, compared to Rosarito which has low cost housing and mobile home parks and overall is a bit tacky.  

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3 hours ago, HarryB said:

No, I think that the horror at the border should be reacted to by Mexico. Perhaps if mexico started treating americans the same way, Trump and congress would do something humane. BTW Immigration judges are doing hearings in under a minute.

 

 

Aha...but I've not heard of any caravans of Americans or Canadians heading for the southern border demanding they be let in or they will break in. I wonder why that is? ...And if they did "break in" how do you suppose the Mexican government would treat them? I have my own thoughts about that but of course, it's just MHO.

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they come on tourist visas and are too cheap to keep their visas current, Check outdated car plates.

 

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They don't realize that deportation only allows the clothes on their back to travel, the accommodations may be a bit uncomfortable, and always includes a ban for returning for at least five years.

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6 hours ago, pappysmarket said:

Aha...but I've not heard of any caravans of Americans or Canadians heading for the southern border demanding they be let in or they will break in. I wonder why that is? ...And if they did "break in" how do you suppose the Mexican government would treat them? I have my own thoughts about that but of course, it's just MHO.

You wonder why that is? Because Mexico is easy about letting Americans and Canadians in. There's no need to storm the border, they are welcomed, their children aren't taken from them and locked away somewhere. They aren't inhumane. In fact, one of the things I love about Mexico is that almost all the immigration and customs officials I've encountered don't find it necessary to shed their humanity when they don their uniform. They still smile, laugh, joke around. Try getting even a hint of a smile out of a US border guard. They're like automatons.

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10 hours ago, mudgirl said:

You wonder why that is? Because Mexico is easy about letting Americans and Canadians in. There's no need to storm the border, they are welcomed, their children aren't taken from them and locked away somewhere. They aren't inhumane. In fact, one of the things I love about Mexico is that almost all the immigration and customs officials I've encountered don't find it necessary to shed their humanity when they don their uniform. They still smile, laugh, joke around. Try getting even a hint of a smile out of a US border guard. They're like automatons.

I would not quarrel with anything past your second sentence. I would totally disagree with your conclusion that there are no caravans because it's so easy to get in. Seems more like there is no free stuff on offer to Que up for. Now, would you like to assert that is how refugees are treated coming in the southern border of Mexico?...I didn't think so.

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11 hours ago, HarryB said:

they come on tourist visas and are too cheap to keep their visas current, Check outdated car plates.

 

My wife served 2 years in the Peace Corps. She tells me that 2 years is the maximum, for a very simple reason:  More than that and the volunteers sometimes "Go Native". You might ponder that.

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12 hours ago, mudgirl said:

You wonder why that is? Because Mexico is easy about letting Americans and Canadians in. There's no need to storm the border, they are welcomed, their children aren't taken from them and locked away somewhere. They aren't inhumane. In fact, one of the things I love about Mexico is that almost all the immigration and customs officials I've encountered don't find it necessary to shed their humanity when they don their uniform. They still smile, laugh, joke around. Try getting even a hint of a smile out of a US border guard. They're like automatons.

Interesting observations..Many times the US immigration guy has given me a "welcome  home" greeting...not that I am happy waiting like cattle inline..but that's one r story

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Just now, lakeside7 said:

Interesting observations..Many times the US immigration guy has given me a "welcome  home" greeting...not that I am happy waiting like cattle inline..but that's one r story

When we lived here 2008 thru end of 2012, that was our experience as well.  However, since relocating in Ajijic in early 2017, not so much.  We get the skunk eye when they view our passport history (we are either in MEX or EU 85% of the year).  We have been asked questions that agents have no right to ask (do you own a home in MEX?), but we answer rather than tell them it's none of their effing business as we have no desire to miss connecting flights. 

We are pale retirees with non-Hispanic names travelling via Global Entry which means we have been interviewed and cleared by TSA and they have our fingerprints (and now facial recognition attributes); I can only imagine the crap these agents give people they suspect are of Hispanic heritage.  

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None of my "Hispanic"  relatives (and I have many who are world travelers ages 22-75) ever have a problem in US immigration. None have bothered to pay for the Global Entry  system.  

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8 minutes ago, Bisbee Gal said:

When we lived here 2008 thru end of 2012, that was our experience as well.  However, since relocating in Ajijic in early 2017, not so much.  We get the skunk eye when they view our passport history (we are either in MEX or EU 85% of the year).  We have been asked questions that agents have no right to ask (do you own a home in MEX?), but we answer rather than tell them it's none of their effing business as we have no desire to miss connecting flights. 

We are pale retirees with non-Hispanic names travelling via Global Entry which means we have been interviewed and cleared by TSA and they have our fingerprints (and now facial recognition attributes); I can only imagine the crap these agents give people they suspect are of Hispanic heritage.  

Many of the immigration staff are of Latino background and seem to give other brothers a big smile

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