Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard
Floradude

Very Bad Eggs

Recommended Posts

It is Thursday morning and I am looking forward to an omelet. Everything else is ready.  I break an egg in the bowel and some gross and dark brown fluid flows.  Down the sink with it.  The next four eggs I broke had baby chicks in them. Unfortunately I had previously eaten some of the eggs.

The eggs were white and purchased at Superlake.  The brand is Huevo de Campo.   Libro de Joula    12 eggs in the plastic container with an orange label.

This is first for me in my 16 + years in Mexico.  Not a nice way to start the day.  I will not be able to go back to Superlake with container until Friday at the earliest.

Buyer Beware...

  

  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before I even use any eggs here, I put water in a bowl and test each egg. If it floats, it's fine. If it sinks, throw it out. I have also experienced what you have Floradude and decided I wasn't ever going to see such grossness again. It can (and has) happened in other locations in Mexico.

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the suggestion  Ferret.  I will try that but I know me and after a few weeks of floating eggs I probably quit.  I guess 5 eggs out of the hundreds I have used in well over 16 years is not too bad; however, I will not use that brand again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, dichosalocura said:

Floradude said the eggs were libre de jaula, I guess those hens were having some hanky panky while out of their cages.

But yeah, that is not a good way to wake up in the morning, and kind of traumatizing. 

Nothing wrong with free-range eggs, even if they've been fertilized. What would have happened is that they are collecting old eggs which have already started to develop into chickens. If they were collected fresh daily and refridgerated immediately, it would just look like a normal egg.

Also happened to me once- broke an egg into the pan and there was an almost fully formed chick in it. Certainly took my appetite away.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ooooops. Sorry about that. I should have checked and confirmed the info and provided a link. Obviously I don't eat a lot of eggs any more. Mea culpa!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

Nothing wrong with free-range eggs, even if they've been fertilized. What would have happened is that they are collecting old eggs which have already started to develop into chickens. If they were collected fresh daily and refridgerated immediately, it would just look like a normal egg.

Also happened to me once- broke an egg into the pan and there was an almost fully formed chick in it. Certainly took my appetite away.

A hen keeps eggs under her at about 99 to 100 degrees, after two days the embryo has begun to form, in twenty one days the chick hatches. I guess you could still gather and eat the egg on or after the second day, but I'll take a pass. If the temperature of the egg drops below 99 then incubation stops. Unrefrigerated eggs will stay fresh up to five weeks, in the fridge up to six months.

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Ferret said:

Before I even use any eggs here, I put water in a bowl and test each egg. If it floats, it's fine. If it sinks, throw it out. I have also experienced what you have Floradude and decided I wasn't ever going to see such grossness again. It can (and has) happened in other locations in Mexico.

Ferret,

Oh my gosh!   You can verify what I write here.  I test every egg before I eat.  However, it is the opposite of what you said.  It it sinks, it is edible.  If it floats is should not be eaten.  When the egg is fresh in drops to the bottom of the water.  As it ages. it goes from being on its side in the water and turns upwards, then eventually floats to the top.

 

Cut and pasted from the internet:

Place the egg in a bowl of water. If the egg lays on its side at the bottom, it is still quite fresh. If the egg stands upright on the bottom, it is still fine to eat, but should be eaten very soon, or hard-boiled. If the egg floats to the top, it's past its prime, and not good for eating.Mar 30, 2015

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Floradude said:

It is Thursday morning and I am looking forward to an omelet. Everything else is ready.  I break an egg in the bowel and some gross and dark brown fluid flows.  Down the sink with it.  The next four eggs I broke had baby chicks in them. Unfortunately I had previously eaten some of the eggs.

The eggs were white and purchased at Superlake.  The brand is Huevo de Campo.   Libro de Joula    12 eggs in the plastic container with an orange label.

This is first for me in my 16 + years in Mexico.  Not a nice way to start the day.  I will not be able to go back to Superlake with container until Friday at the earliest.

Buyer Beware...

  

Sympathize with your experience, but have a question.  Did you check the Expiry Date (Caducidad) on the package when you bought them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Zeb said:

Ferret,

Oh my gosh!   You can verify what I write here.  I test every egg before I eat.  However, it is the opposite of what you said.  It it sinks, it is edible.  If it floats is should not be eaten.  When the egg is fresh in drops to the bottom of the water.  As it ages. it goes from being on its side in the water and turns upwards, then eventually floats to the top.

 

Cut and pasted from the internet:

Place the egg in a bowl of water. If the egg lays on its side at the bottom, it is still quite fresh. If the egg stands upright on the bottom, it is still fine to eat, but should be eaten very soon, or hard-boiled. If the egg floats to the top, it's past its prime, and not good for eating.Mar 30, 2015

there is a graphic of  that just a few posts up .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Asia they will set the duck or hen eggs and after 20 days  take the eggs from the hen.  Next they would bury the eggs for 30 days and now they had a hundred year old egg.  They usually buried in clay or sometimes put in lime water for the 30 days.  The chick is formed but is very mushy.  Sometimes they stopped the process early and enjoyed a balut.  Small boys would go around with baskets selling them.  I must say the odor is overpowering so you don' t smell while eating.  You need a few beers to eat one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Floradude said:

Natasha, there is no expiration date on the label or plastic carton.

If that's the case, it would be the first reason I would never buy that or any other brand.... free range or not. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe a vast majority of folks buy their eggs in plastic bags, by the kilo, relying on the system that has stood for many years longer than the influx of American-style containers. Eggs here are also produced differently, and thus don't require refrigeration the same way as up north.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, ComputerGuy said:

I believe a vast majority of folks buy their eggs in plastic bags, by the kilo, relying on the system that has stood for many years longer than the influx of American-style containers. Eggs here are also produced differently, and thus don't require refrigeration the same way as up north.

The eggs I buy at the Tuesday market have always been good. I bring my own carton and fill it. So it costs a little more than Walmart's. It's worth it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed, but I don't go those markets. I get mine at any number of local abarrotes, which are usually cheaper than WalMart or gringo prices.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Ajijic_hiker said:

maybe this will help....

how-to-tell-if-eggs-are-still-good-1388334_FINAL-5c5c932cc9e77c000159c2b9.png

But if there was a chick in it wouldn't it sink? Just wondering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the day it is laid an egg should be good for at least 60 days if refrigerated.  If eggs are not refrigerated they should be good for at least 2 weeks.  In the states the packers usually put a 30 day expiration on the carton.  Depending on the state laws, sometimes the cartons will only contain a Julian date and the store will remove carton after 30 days.  Eggs are usually safe for another 3 or 4 weeks after the expiration date so selling them up to the 30 day removal is OK.  Commercial farms do not have roosters so eggs are not fertilized and you won't find the blood of a forming chick in them.  With a free range egg you will often find a little blood spot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...