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Cautionary note--large increase in medical costs here

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2 hours ago, chapalence said:

Not all are as fortunate as you to have the funds from a house sale NOB to put into a "contingency" fund. Many live in near poverty here which is a step up from the streets of anytown USA where they would be living had they not come here. This is a reality for many elders these days, especially single women whose SS savings were made smaller than their male counterparts because of vast income disparity between the sexes. This does NOT make them irresponsible adults, it signals a problem within the society in which they have spent most of their lives, working hard and doing the best their personal circumstances have allowed.

We have very little money, a house many wouldn't even consider due to its size and lack of amenities, but we're happy and express our gratitude daily for our blessings. What we will never do is belittle anyone in need of help or suggest they should have lived their life differently to arrive at a place that is more acceptable to those who like to toot their own horns for somehow thinking they're better human beings. Compassion takes one further on the path home than judgements. 

 

 

 

I could have predicted that kind of self righteous response.  Suppose I put it another way:  Why would a responsible person move away from a country which has provisions for illness like Medicare and Medicaid for its poorer citizens to a country where the options are much chancier and then hope for charity from others?

I feel plenty of compassion for those who are deserving of it.  Then I hear a plea from someone who has not even bothered to sign up for Seguro Popular or IMSS.  Excuses?

I was not particularly fortunate in my financial circumstances in the U.S., so forget that .  I was a saver and didn't
"need" what that consumerist society foisted on people.  In Mexico, the house we bought would be a remodeling challenge most people wouldn't touch.  I'm afraid your broad brush doesn't apply here. I was simply raised by people with the attitude  that one did everything else possible before asking for charity.  YMMV.

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On July 26, 2019 at 5:46 PM, lakeside7 said:

Cedros the other insurance that is becoming more widely used at Lakeside is GOFUNDME , it helps to have a good script writer and of course no premium

GOFUNDME? Really? That seems like just online begging.

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39 minutes ago, MNJames said:

GOFUNDME? Really? That seems like just online begging.

I believe that was the point the poster was making, using sarcasm.

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1 hour ago, gringal said:

I could have predicted that kind of self righteous response.  Suppose I put it another way:  Why would a responsible person move away from a country which has provisions for illness like Medicare and Medicaid for its poorer citizens to a country where the options are much chancier and then hope for charity from others?

I feel plenty of compassion for those who are deserving of it.  Then I hear a plea from someone who has not even bothered to sign up for Seguro Popular or IMSS.  Excuses?

I was not particularly fortunate in my financial circumstances in the U.S., so forget that .  I was a saver and didn't
"need" what that consumerist society foisted on people.  In Mexico, the house we bought would be a remodeling challenge most people wouldn't touch.  I'm afraid your broad brush doesn't apply here. I was simply raised by people with the attitude  that one did everything else possible before asking for charity.  YMMV.

Good points. It is so sad to see people here that are living from pension check to pension check with nothing set aside for emergencies. Those go fund me events are so sad.  

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Yes. Those fundraising events are very sad. Interesting how in some they elicit compassion and in others sneering judgement. I find it interesting that some do not consider it being fortunate to end up with a house that sells for enough profit to purchase and renovate another one and leave them a contingency fund for illness. It was all due to their brilliant planning and hard work. As though no one who planned and worked hard ended up somewhere they never intended to be. What is most amusing is when these same people accuse others of being self-righteous. 

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4 minutes ago, Xena said:

Yes. Those fundraising events are very sad. Interesting how in some they elicit compassion and in others sneering judgement. I find it interesting that some do not consider it being fortunate to end up with a house that sells for enough profit to purchase and renovate another one and leave them a contingency fund for illness. It was all due to their brilliant planning and hard work. As though no one who planned and worked hard ended up somewhere they never intended to be. What is most amusing is when these same people accuse others of being self-righteous. 

Since you know nothing about my history and what it took to end up with a house sale leaving enough to have a "contingency fund" for emergencies, don't you think there might be a wee amount of downright nastiness and/or intolerance in that post?  I have no need to explain further.  You're very good with words, Zena. In this case, you've also made wide ranging assumptions lacking any foundation.

Before anyone does "online begging", I think that at the very least they should say whether they are signed up with the Mexican health care options which so generously allow us expats to join. 

🖖

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Three weeks ago my father of 87 had a triple hernia operation in Guadalajara. Total cost for everything/everyone was only 51,000 pesos thanks to the connections of our local general doctor Dra. Carla Cueva Flores.

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1 hour ago, gringal said:

Since you know nothing about my history and what it took to end up with a house sale leaving enough to have a "contingency fund" for emergencies, don't you think there might be a wee amount of downright nastiness and/or intolerance in that post?  I have no need to explain further.  You're very good with words, Zena. In this case, you've also made wide ranging assumptions lacking any foundation.

Before anyone does "online begging", I think that at the very least they should say whether they are signed up with the Mexican health care options which so generously allow us expats to join. 

🖖

Do you ever consider the remotest possibility that your posts might on occasion contain a wee bit of nastiness and/or intolerance? I have no need for you to tell any stories to explain why you believe good fortune plays no part in your story or you seem to consider it a moral failing for people to not end up how you did. I make no assumptions about you and how you got where you are. I just know that every human life contains elements of luck or grace or good fortune, whatever you want to call it. Thank you for the compliment about being good with words. It is my only skill. 

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Tit for tat expected, but it would be more useful if you had responded to my major issue with online begging:  Are those people signed up with either Seguro Popular or IMSS, and if they are and those entities refuse to treat their illness, THEN I would feel like contributing to their need.  Contrary to your opinion, I am not a heartless person.  I just expect people to take care of themselves when they can...as I did through some very hard times.

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16 minutes ago, gringal said:

Tit for tat expected, but it would be more useful if you had responded to my major issue with online begging:  Are those people signed up with either Seguro Popular or IMSS, and if they are and those entities refuse to treat their illness, THEN I would feel like contributing to their need.  Contrary to your opinion, I am not a heartless person.  I just expect people to take care of themselves when they can...as I did through some very hard times.

I do not care if you contribute to requests for help (or “begging” if you prefer). Unlike you, I believe to whom people donate money is their own business. People are free to ask and other people free to donate or not as they wish. If I read a request for money I donate or I don’t. You are free to do the same.

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Well, it sounds like IMSS (which I have but never use) and SP are going downhill.  The same can be said for Medicare up north in case you didn't know.  I'm glad I chose NOT to buy a house but rather, have the contingency fund for medical issues - and a great deal on a rental home.  When I was new here, 11 years ago, I had an emergency hip replacement which costed me $130,000 pesos on a day when the peso actually was 10 to the USD.  I paid for it with my debit card.  Does anyone know what a hip replacement in GDL costs these days?  Cuidase mucho!

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19 minutes ago, ezpz said:

Well, it sounds like IMSS (which I have but never use) and SP are going downhill.  The same can be said for Medicare up north in case you didn't know.  I'm glad I chose NOT to buy a house but rather, have the contingency fund for medical issues - and a great deal on a rental home.  When I was new here, 11 years ago, I had an emergency hip replacement which costed me $130,000 pesos on a day when the peso actually was 10 to the USD.  I paid for it with my debit card.  Does anyone know what a hip replacement in GDL costs these days?  Cuidase mucho!

We made sure that we could buy a house and have the contingency cash. To me renting is like throwing money out the window.  Why don't you add up your 11 years of paying rent and how that would stack up against buying something.

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I know this won't be a popular opinion on this board, but I believe, as many others do, that buying any real estate in Mexico is throwing money out the window. Firstly, the government, at all levels is often changing the goalposts, with little or no warning. Secondly, Mexican properties are difficult to sell, and this trend will become greater as disposable incomes sink in the North. Thirdly, the lack of infrastructure and town planning means the character of a neighborhood or community can change overnight. Then you want to move. But you can't sell the house for what you think its worth. Buying real estate makes sense for Mexican families who want to form a generational asset and know how to find the bargains and pay minimal taxes. I think of five beautiful homes right now whose kids not want these homes as inheritance, in fact feel inconvenienced. Interrupting which may be the busiest times of their lives, to sort out a mess where they do not know the language, customs and laws.

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Popular or not it is, as you suggested, an opinion and others whose experience is different can and probably will chime in as MMV.

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15 minutes ago, CHILLIN said:

I know this won't be a popular opinion on this board, but I believe, as many others do, that buying any real estate in Mexico is throwing money out the window. Firstly, the government, at all levels is often changing the goalposts, with little or no warning. Secondly, Mexican properties are difficult to sell, and this trend will become greater as disposable incomes sink in the North. Thirdly, the lack of infrastructure and town planning means the character of a neighborhood or community can change overnight. Then you want to move. But you can't sell the house for what you think its worth. Buying real estate makes sense for Mexican families who want to form a generational asset and know how to find the bargains and pay minimal taxes. I think of five beautiful homes right now whose kids not want these homes as inheritance, in fact feel inconvenienced. Interrupting which may be the busiest times of their lives, to sort out a mess where they do not know the language, customs and laws.

My heart just BLEEDS for those poor unfortunate heirs. How inconsiderate of someone to leave them an asset. A shame the deceased didn't realize what a burden they were leaving, they might have made other arrangements.

PS: If you are so "conflicted" about Mexico and living here...why in God's name are you becoming a citizen as you recently posted?

Relax, spark one up!

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19 hours ago, gringal said:

Before anyone does "online begging", I think that at the very least they should say whether they are signed up with the Mexican health care options which so generously allow us expats to join. 

🖖

But ignorance often at play here. For example the British lady was offered a no cost hip replacement but the Social Worker was probably adamant that she have 24 hr bilingual care, and that it would be expedient if she provided her own medicines. This is it came the requirement of $175 per day. Her team didn't know these things are negotiable, and other public hospitals are not so strict about these thing, especially for foreigners. They beleive that family members would not drop everything so they could be by another family member's side. By in large that is what Mexicans do - unless you have been an S.O.B. your entire life.

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24 minutes ago, CHILLIN said:

I know this won't be a popular opinion on this board, but I believe, as many others do, that buying any real estate in Mexico is throwing money out the window. Firstly, the government, at all levels is often changing the goalposts, with little or no warning. Secondly, Mexican properties are difficult to sell, and this trend will become greater as disposable incomes sink in the North. Thirdly, the lack of infrastructure and town planning means the character of a neighborhood or community can change overnight. Then you want to move. But you can't sell the house for what you think its worth. Buying real estate makes sense for Mexican families who want to form a generational asset and know how to find the bargains and pay minimal taxes. I think of five beautiful homes right now whose kids not want these homes as inheritance, in fact feel inconvenienced. Interrupting which may be the busiest times of their lives, to sort out a mess where they do not know the language, customs and laws.

Is it online begging if you were to mention to those five heirs that I would be happy to inherit those houses  off their hands for minimal expense on their part ? 

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1 minute ago, ea93105 said:

Is it online begging if you were to mention to those five heirs that I would be happy to inherit those houses  off their hands for minimal expense on their part ? 

I think Chillin has gotten in line ahead of you...

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24 minutes ago, pappysmarket said:

My heart just BLEEDS for those poor unfortunate heirs. How inconsiderate of someone to leave them an asset. A shame the deceased didn't realize what a burden they were leaving, they might have made other arrangements.

I know, I was surprised too. At least three of them had assets far greater than their folks old house in Mexico. And some of these old folks still had plenty of assets remaining in the U.S.A. You would be really surprised how many vacant homes there are around here.

One of the Fathers bought 4 or 5 houses down here in the late seventies, early eighties, as a way of hiding U.S. taxable income. This is still a popular, but now illegal move. By bringing the Mexican homes in as a part of a sizable estate could have created big IRS. problems. all these homes, and the other ones I mentioned were sold for 30 to 50% of their values. This is also why there are so many bargain hunters out there right now, after these stories get around.

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49 minutes ago, CHILLIN said:

I know, I was surprised too. At least three of them had assets far greater than their folks old house in Mexico. And some of these old folks still had plenty of assets remaining in the U.S.A. You would be really surprised how many vacant homes there are around here.

One of the Fathers bought 4 or 5 houses down here in the late seventies, early eighties, as a way of hiding U.S. taxable income. This is still a popular, but now illegal move. By bringing the Mexican homes in as a part of a sizable estate could have created big IRS. problems. all these homes, and the other ones I mentioned were sold for 30 to 50% of their values. This is also why there are so many bargain hunters out there right now, after these stories get around.

Confusing fiction!!!

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1 hour ago, CHILLIN said:

One of the Fathers bought 4 or 5 houses down here in the late seventies, early eighties, as a way of hiding U.S. taxable income. This is still a popular, but now illegal move.

By bringing the Mexican homes in as a part of a sizable estate could have created big IRS. problems. all these homes, and the other ones I mentioned were sold for 30 to 50% of their values. This is also why there are so many bargain hunters out there right now, after these stories get around.

As a retired career (30+ years) tax official, both these statements set off my BS meter.  

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42 minutes ago, Bisbee Gal said:

As a retired career (30+ years) tax official, both these statements set off my BS meter.  

Really! Maybe because I spent more time on the other side, meeting some of the wealthiest people in the world, and as per quotes by Donald Trump the businessman, in the 1980's "avoiding" taxes was a big game.

It still goes on today, Russian ogliarchs hiding their money in multi-layered U.S. real estate shelters, mainland Chinese hiding their wealth in Canadian properties, which they have no intention of ever living in.

And to my favorite fanboy, Pappy, I am not conflicted about living in Mexico. Buying real estate has no charm for me, but I did buy a house for my Mother in my early 30's - how about you?

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Oh

7 minutes ago, CHILLIN said:

Really! Maybe because I spent more time on the other side, meeting some of the wealthiest people in the world, and as per quotes by Donald Trump the businessman, in the 1980's "avoiding" taxes was a big game.

It still goes on today, Russian ogliarchs hiding their money in multi-layered U.S. real estate shelters, mainland Chinese hiding their wealth in Canadian properties, which they have no intention of ever living in.

And to my favorite fanboy, Pappy, I am not conflicted about living in Mexico. Buying real estate has no charm for me, but I did buy a house for my Mother in my early 30's - how about you?

Ohhhhh.....so your talking Russian and Chinese tax laws.  Nice try.  And you said they bought properties here to offset taxable income which was LEGAL then, but ILLEGAL now.  Do tell?

And that houses are sold at 30% or 40% of fair market value to avoid IRS taxes.....laughable, unless you can tell us when either estate or income tax rates exceeded 100%  

Blanket hyperbolic statements never help anyone make a case.  

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11 minutes ago, Bisbee Gal said:

Oh

Ohhhhh.....so your talking Russian and Chinese tax laws.  Nice try.  And you said they bought properties here to offset taxable income which was LEGAL then, but ILLEGAL now.  Do tell?

And that houses are sold at 30% or 40% of fair market value to avoid IRS taxes.....laughable, unless you can tell us when either estate or income tax rates exceeded 100%  

Blanket hyperbolic statements never help anyone make a case.  

Hahaha...it's coming outta his ears!

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20 minutes ago, CHILLIN said:

Really! Maybe because I spent more time on the other side, meeting some of the wealthiest people in the world, and as per quotes by Donald Trump the businessman, in the 1980's "avoiding" taxes was a big game.

It still goes on today, Russian ogliarchs hiding their money in multi-layered U.S. real estate shelters, mainland Chinese hiding their wealth in Canadian properties, which they have no intention of ever living in.

And to my favorite fanboy, Pappy, I am not conflicted about living in Mexico. Buying real estate has no charm for me, but I did buy a house for my Mother in my early 30's - how about you?

Good for you, I'm proud of you, I suspect owning a home has "had no charm for you" for quite some time,  whether in Canada or Mexico.

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