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110v -> 220v CFE meter

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I currently have a single 110V meter, but I may want to change to a single 220v meter because of a pump and A/C.

When I was at CFE I asked if the cost of electricity would be higher, they said no but I'm skeptical. My mexican electrician mention I might be charged a  commercial rate.

Anyone know more about this ?

Thanks

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16 minutes ago, ea93105 said:

When I was at CFE I asked if the cost of electricity would be higher, they said no

The cost of electricity depends on the rate tier you're on.

When we had our house completely rewired we went from 110 to 220 and the price per kw didn't change. 

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Totally normal change to make, no price difference on the power, and most homes are 220 V / 2 phase ("fases").     

Your electrician should have no issue coordinating this, it is done all the time.   

Even years ago when CFE only had 110 V meters, many homes had 2 of them, 1 phase through each, to have 220 V in the house.   Definitely the way to go.

Also....if one phase goes out, you can still have 1 phase available in the house, and run extension cords as needed to keep key 110 V things going like the fridge.

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2 minutes ago, Go Solar said:

Totally normal change to make, no price difference on the power, and most homes are 220 V / 2 phase ("fases").     

Your electrician should have no issue coordinating this, it is done all the time.   

Even years ago when CFE only had 110 V meters, many homes had 2 of them, 1 phase through each, to have 220 V in the house.   Definitely the way to go.

Also....if one phase goes out, you can still have 1 phase available in the house, and run extension cords as needed to keep key 110 V things going like the fridge.

Good info, thanks

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14 minutes ago, ea93105 said:

Thanks

What determines the rate tier ? How much electricity was used over a certain period ?

First, the locale within Mexico. Then, what you mentioned. Once you jump into DAC, the highest/most expensive rate tier, you're paying a whole lot more per kwh than those who are conservative users. A few bills in DAC and we made the decision to go solar. 

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I wired my casita myself.  I ran 220 wire from my junction box to the casita and put a  30 amp breaker in.  I only hooked up one of the two wires and the ground.  I now have 110 for the casita but have capability for 220 if I ever need it.  Only set back at all is the 220 wire costs about double the cost of 110. I bought the all weather wire and buried it.  Mexican junction boxes tend to be smaller but I bought a larger one so each room in my house can have its own breakers.

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DAC rates start being applied once KwH exceed 500 in a 2 month billing period.

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With respect to DAC 'tho, one is no more or less likely to get into that tier with 220 than 110....unless of course the reason one is getting 220 is for an anticipated addition like pool or A/C.

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1 hour ago, tomgates said:

DAC rates start being applied once KwH exceed 500 in a 2 month billing period.

True if often enough but DAC is applied after your 3000 subsidized KWHs are used up in a 12 month period. 3000/12=250 per month. You can go over 500 KWHs one or more billing periods and stay out of DAC. It is worth watching your electricity consumption carefully in Mexico.

The 7 climatic zones have different subsidized amounts of KWHs.

When I lived in Mexicali I recieved 24,000 subsidized KWHs in a 12 month period. No problem to cool my house.

I think Puerto Vallarta gets 4800.

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6 hours ago, ea93105 said:

I currently have a single 110V meter, but I may want to change to a single 220v meter because of a pump and A/C.

When I was at CFE I asked if the cost of electricity would be higher, they said no but I'm skeptical. My mexican electrician mention I might be charged a  commercial rate.

Anyone know more about this ?

Thanks

220 110 no difference. You pay by the watts used

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If the pump and air conditioning will be new additions to your house system, it can reasonably presumed that, as a result of adding and using these items (regardless of either 110v or 220v) you'll be using more electricity.  More usage = higher total CFE bill.

Residential connections to CFE commonly have three rate levels.  If your usage exceeds the maximum for level one, you'll be pushed into level two.  And if you exceed level two maximums, you'll be pushed into level three. 

If you are interested in keeping your monthly bill low, aside from the obvious, "use less electricity", there are a few options...  The one many here choose is adding solar panels and an inverter, some even have back up batteries for emergency.  The initial investment pays off over some years (local solar companies can calculate that for you).

Or, if you have a Casita (and even if you don't) you might be able to get a second meter.  This is also quite common here.  Under this plan, you might carefully "balance" electrical usage between the two meters (done by choosing which items are connected to each meter).  You might have two meters that are both in rate level one, instead of having one meter, that might be pushed up into rate level two, or even three.

By looking at your current CFE bills, you can see your routine, current usage level, and by reading the specifications on the (if new) new pump and air conditioning units, and estimating how many hours per day each might be expected to operate, you can estimate what your new level of usage might be, and thereby, determine if you'd likely be exceeding maximum usage for any of the three rate plans.

Another option, with a higher initial cost, is to purchase and install your own "transformer", which can be sized to your expected usage.  This is allowed for residences as well and commercial/industrial.  (I have one.)

When you have your own transformer, the three rate levels no longer apply.  Instead, you'll have a fixed rate, commonly mid-way between the kilowatt rate levels one and two, regardless of how much electricity you consume.  No rate level bumps for usage.

There is a company about two miles east of Tuxcueca (south shore) that builds transformers to your specifications.  In Guadalajara there are commercial electrical  supplies companies which can offer you various other transformers (Schneider & DESA are two).

Personal transformer = flat rate/single tier pricing structure. 

Solar systems owners can end up paying next to nothing after the purchase and installation costs.

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The problem with your own transformer on your own property is that if it blows or needs to be fixed and/or replaced then YOU pay.

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12 hours ago, Ferret said:

The problem with your own transformer on your own property is that if it blows or needs to be fixed and/or replaced then YOU pay.

Commonly, when a transformer "blows", you hear the dreaded "bang", it is simply a fuse, not the transformer itself.  Fuses are quite cheap, usually 1 or 2 amp is used, and there are usually a sufficient number of locals who can replace it for you.  I keep a few extra fuses on hand along with a couple of phone numbers.  But only had to replace one fuse in the last year.

A transformer itself is unlikely to "blow" or require "fixing".  Mine is many years old and still handling the (reported) 23,000 volts per hot - times 2 - off the CFE mains.

EVERY option has trade offs, compromises.  No single option is always right for everybody.  For many, having their own transformer has more benefits than detriments.

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On ‎6‎/‎27‎/‎2019 at 11:17 AM, Ferret said:

The problem with your own transformer on your own property is that if it blows or needs to be fixed and/or replaced then YOU pay.

Plus you are still paying for ALL the kWh of power used, even if it is at a blended rate.     Vs little or no net use, with clean power, self-generated.      We've had several people "deed" their transformer over / back to CFE, happy to be rid of it, including at least one with their own well.

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Gosh. There was no mention that in much of Mexico, residential homes are connected to a three phase transformer (you can look up and see the three fuses on the transformers) and that each phase is not 180 degrees out of phase with the other but 120 degrees. and that a single phase is 127 volts and two phase is 220 volts.

That was just an interesting fact and yes we are still charged by the watt. Oh and the voltage does not have to be exactly as stated but within 10% thereof.

Please correct me if I am wrong, Go Solar.

Oh, and of course, I have photovoltaic solar panels and love them.

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Much depends on which type of transformer CFE has installed; there is more than 1 type used just in the Ajijic area....

 

One type of transformer delivers 127 Line to Neutral, nominal.   The other type of transformer delivers 240 V Line to Line and 120 V Line to Neutral nominal:

 

Transformer type

Nominal Voltage (V)

Line to Line

Line to Neutral

127/220 V Delta

220 V

127 V

120/240 V Split phase

240 V

120 V

 

 And….these are the "220" voltage ranges each type can give, according to CFE´s specifications (so things to be "plugged in" and used in the house, or otherwise connected (such as grid tied inverters) can potentially need to deal with from the low of one, to the high of the other, depending on location)….

 

Transformer type

Min Limit (-10%)

Nominal Line to Line voltage

Max Limit (+10%)

127/220 V Delta

198 V

220 V

242 V

120/240 V Split phase

216 V

240 V

264 V

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