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Ready-mix concrete & steel availability on the North Shore


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Con permiso, por favor. Curious if anyone has any experience with ordering ready-mix concrete from a company like Cemex up in Guadalajara, and if so, any ideas on cost per cu. meter and haul charge. Also wondering about pricing and availability of rebar. Last, but not least, if you've dealt with Cemex (or similar) do you know if they handle SCC (Self Consolidating Concrete)? I was going to try and contact them myself for answers, but mi español es muy limitado.  :)

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My architect when I renew my pool, I contract to the ready mix company that is located in ixtlahuacan of the quinces, they have different types of constets, it depends on what you occupy, and on material they give you the price. If you need more info or contact of that company send me a PM. Saludos
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15 minutes ago, vista lake said:

My architect when I renew my pool, I contract to the ready mix company that is located in ixtlahuacan of the quinces, they have different types of constets, it depends on what you occupy, and on material they give you the price. If you need more info or contact of that company send me a PM. Saludos

Muchas gracias por su informacion!

(pardon any misuse/misspellings as I'm attempting to use my Spanish as much as possible when I can)

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24 minutes ago, vista lake said:

My architect when I renew my pool, I contract to the ready mix company that is located in ixtlahuacan of the quinces, they have different types of constets, it depends on what you occupy, and on material they give you the price. If you need more info or contact of that company send me a PM. Saludos

Tried to PM you but received a message saying that you cannot receive messages.

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I have always wondered why so few builders use the BombaCreta when pouring roofs. Our roof, on a 1200 square foot house, was poured in the course of a day. Fine tuning took place over the following two days. No leaks. This carrying buckets of cement up a ladder is really old school and you probably end up paying the same because of the time it takes.

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2 hours ago, el blanco barba said:

 

http://www.readymix.com.mx/

 

I've had two deliveries from these guys who are located near Ixtlahuacan.  

We didn't hire a pump so we had to have six wheelbarrows with six guys hauling the mix to where it was needed. They give you about an hour to unload the truck which was 12 cubic meters last time.

Recommend buying a large sheet of plastic for where the transfer happens, there will be spillage.

 

 

 

 

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32 minutes ago, Ferret said:

I have always wondered why so few builders use the BombaCreta when pouring roofs. Our roof, on a 1200 square foot house, was poured in the course of a day. Fine tuning took place over the following two days. No leaks. This carrying buckets of cement up a ladder is really old school and you probably end up paying the same because of the time it takes.

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OSHA nightmare!  lol

I grew up working in a family owned construction biz, so my cousin and I were the usual "cost savers". No need to hire a pump truck or crane... yeah, I don't miss it. Later, when I was running my own company, we found ways of using machines and mechanical advantage in places people had never thought of, so apparently the impact of all of that fun stuck with me. :)

We did a lot of renovation and demolition work and one time dismantled a small skid steer loader and transported the parts to the 14th floor of a building over a weekend. Removed all of the interior improvements down to the core in a day and had it all gone before the following Monday morning. Client was overjoyed with our early completion, til a security guard inadvertently ratted us out. Then the guy almost had a heart attack, but it all ended well.

As long as I can get a hold of SCC admix I won't really need a crew. I've built what I'm planning before, so most trucks have enough elevation to pour what and where I need as they creep by. Still have no idea of the material costs though.

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You're going to have to do that when you're here because prices change. Fyi, we bought all the clay bricks for the house in August of 2005 when we weren't even going to start building until October 1st. Our builder gave us a heads up that the prices were going up by 15% in September but then he was a dream builder whom I still greatly admire. On the coast, not here. You have a steep learning curve ahead of you especially if you don't speak Spanish.

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1 hour ago, Ferret said:

You're going to have to do that when you're here because prices change. Fyi, we bought all the clay bricks for the house in August of 2005 when we weren't even going to start building until October 1st. Our builder gave us a heads up that the prices were going up by 15% in September but then he was a dream builder whom I still greatly admire. On the coast, not here. You have a steep learning curve ahead of you especially if you don't speak Spanish.

Yeah, brilliant me took 7 years of French. Later worked in Port Cartier, Quebec for a bit, but other than that, it has mostly proven a useless. Still, it's fun learning new things as I get older.

If the concrete and steel aren't too severe I'd prefer to avoid the brick altogether. Haven't really evaluated the seismic challenges there, but I much prefer the higher ductility of steel reinforced concrete for my application.

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2 hours ago, ea93105 said:

http://www.readymix.com.mx/

 

I've had two deliveries from these guys who are located near Ixtlahuacan.  

We didn't hire a pump so we had to have six wheelbarrows with six guys hauling the mix to where it was needed. They give you about an hour to unload the truck which was 12 cubic meters last time.

Recommend buying a large sheet of plastic for where the transfer happens, there will be spillage.

 

 

 

 

Thanks. These guys appear to have a couple of plants in the area, so good to know.

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3 minutes ago, el blanco barba said:

If the concrete and steel aren't too severe I'd prefer to avoid the brick altogether. Haven't really evaluated the seismic challenges there, but I much prefer the higher ductility of steel reinforced concrete for my application.

I hear ya. Used to own a farmhouse in Ontario that was 125 years old when we bought it in '86. Slipform concrete with no insulation and lathe and plaster on the inside walls. Damn thing was like an above ground bomb shelter with walls a foot thick. It was cool in the heat of summer and warm in winter even with a howling blizzard going on. There is seismic activity in this area though... nothing big yet but the ground does shimmy occasionally which may be something to consider.

 

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6 minutes ago, Ferret said:

I hear ya. Used to own a farmhouse in Ontario that was 125 years old when we bought it in '86. Slipform concrete with no insulation and lathe and plaster on the inside walls. Damn thing was like an above ground bomb shelter with walls a foot thick. It was cool in the heat of summer and warm in winter even with a howling blizzard going on. There is seismic activity in this area though... nothing big yet but the ground does shimmy occasionally which may be something to consider.

 

Was once involved in demolishing one of the oldest steel reinforced buildings on the eastern seaboard, and it was impressive. Even after over a hundred years down on the waterfront, it was still a bugger to take down. Implosion had been considered, but quickly dismissed because by the time there would be enough material removed to weaken the structure for a proper implosion, it would just  fall down on its own.

On a much smaller scale, where seismic base isolation may not be economically feasible, the continuous load path provided by a steel reinforced structure where the walls and roof are all integrated with a structural slab has proven extremely quake resistant, so that and the temperature buffering characteristics of the resultant thermal mass seem that they'd be well suited to the area. I don't require a big box, so mine can affordably be built to basically shake, rattle and roll as one contiguous element.  

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That will probably work, unless your hobbies include marbles, or a bowling alley.  Our last home once had level ground, but when we bought it the back yard and part of a garage had gained about ten inches, relative to the main house.  Garden walls had developed a bit of a tilt toward the street, but neighbors parked there anyway.  In ten years, the back yard gained another inch or two.  We placed a rock garden along the major fault.  However, we wish we could still be occupying that home. Minor cracks are easy to fix. Tilting: not so easy.  :)

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27 minutes ago, RVGRINGO said:

That will probably work, unless your hobbies include marbles, or a bowling alley.  Our last home once had level ground, but when we bought it the back yard and part of a garage had gained about ten inches, relative to the main house.  Garden walls had developed a bit of a tilt toward the street, but neighbors parked there anyway.  In ten years, the back yard gained another inch or two.  We placed a rock garden along the major fault.  However, we wish we could still be occupying that home. Minor cracks are easy to fix. Tilting: not so easy.  :)

Sounds like a business opportunity for someone with a grout pump. ;)

Once had a realtor try to sell me a waterfront property that was half on shore and half over the water. The water had a bacteria with an affinity for wood pilings, and they had caused the far end of the three story building to settle over a foot relative to the front door on shore. Speaking of bowling, if you had let go of a bowling ball at the front door it would have easily crashed through the patio doors facing the water and kept on flying. None of the windows could close, but the realtor still had the nerve to blather on about what a great bargain was to be had and fast it was going to sell. We passed.  lol

Like politicians and preachers, some people can say almost anything with a straight face.

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3 hours ago, el blanco barba said:

Yeah, brilliant me took 7 years of French. Later worked in Port Cartier, Quebec for a bit, but other than that, it has mostly proven a useless. Still, it's fun learning new things as I get older.

If the concrete and steel aren't too severe I'd prefer to avoid the brick altogether. Haven't really evaluated the seismic challenges there, but I much prefer the higher ductility of steel reinforced concrete for my application.

You are going to find that many of the admixtures are not available here. You might find a small RediMix plant that would use them if you shipped them down. Actually pallets of a plasticized stucco in color would be worth shipping in. Painting will have to be done way too often after the first 7 years and the colored modern stucco is a permanent fix.  Waterproofing additive should be ordered and mixed in as well. If you could talk to Cemex corporate (think they are in Monterrey) they might order in from their US warehouse for you. 

You will find that moisture wicking up from the ground near the tie beam causing salitre (raising damp) inside and out is a huge problem after a few years. The problem is a lack of waterproofing where the wall start upward. The concrete, stucco and any grout or mortar should all contain the water proofing additive.

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For the steel and rebar, plenty of good competitive local places like Aceros Chapala just east of town, and the one in Riberas on north side of the road.   No need to shop further afield for that. 

https://www.facebook.com/Aceros-ocotlan-302761786598303/

(this is the parent company link, all same organization)

Just ask for a quote - and make sure they include the delivery cost - for the type and amounts desired.    

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