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Mitch210

Where to Stay When I Visit

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yes typical gringo market although it is near my house.. I do not go ther either, the stampede is ridiculous and the variety of fresh veggies not that great.

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#slainte39 LOL....you are right...I guess it's a matter of semantics....

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5 hours ago, Ferret said:

I agree with Xena and mudgirl. One should ALWAYS soak veggies and fruit in Microdyn solution (or?) unless you are going to peel them or cook them. The exception (for me) is to buy hydroponic "organically" grown Mr. Lucky lettuce in WallyWorld which states that it's ready to eat. I particularly like the butter lettuce since it still has roots. I use it from the outside in and run the root ball under purified water before I put it back in the fridge. Keeps it green and crisp.

On Tuesdays, there is an "organic" market in West Ajijic at the La Huerta Event Centre with lots of fresh fruits and vegetables and meats and ready made meals. It's very crowded in high season and opens at 10 am to a lineup. Closes at 2 pm

At best, I would say that true licensed organic growers do not exist here. Hell, you still have to wash the feathers and poop from some brands of eggs before using them... and don't expect the eggs to be a uniform size within the same dozen either.

I buy eggs up here in San Diego now from a woman who raises her hens in a pasture and all the additional feed is organic.  The eggs are never uniform in size or color and now and then, you are washing poop and feathers, but having had an aunt in Kansas who had a farm, that does not phase me.  Whenever I visited, they woke me at 4:30 am to feed and water the animals along with collecting eggs in many nests throughout the farm for our breakfast.....good times, good memories.

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3 hours ago, Mitch210 said:

snip.....The eggs are never uniform in size or color and now and then, you are washing poop and feathers,.... snip

That is what I call organic.

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In the small shops around here, that is exactly how the eggs are.  All different shapes and all different shades and they aren't perfectly clean neither.  You usually tell them how many you want and they place them in a small plastic bag, so be careful.  If we buy eggs at Walmart or Soriana, we usually save the cartons for when we buy the local mom and pop store eggs.  Many people here (like us) will have neighbors that sell their chicken and ducks out of their house.

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Back when I was in my 20s and traveling Mexico, I remember that they used to sell those hard plastic containers that held half a dozen eggs- they sold them wherever they sold plastic stuff. Now you never see them anymore. But you can get them up north in sporting goods stores that sell camping gear. It would be a good thing to bring down from a trip NOB. The eggs in a plastic bag is ridiculous- I can never get 6 home without at least one or two broken.

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Buy a pack in a store an use it.. No need to buy up north.

 

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On 5/31/2019 at 11:16 AM, happyjillin said:

The great shake of the Chapala Mercado is that it's all in one place in el centro plaza and because of that other stores have located around it too. You even have a choice of 4 butchers right in it as well as 2 chicken butchers one of them carries rabbit and quail eggs. 2 fish mongers Tacos,roto chicken,baked goods,desserts,fruit/veggies,flowers and plants birria,menudo and a couple of popular gringo friendly restaurants. 7 days/week.

All of that is sold at the Ajijic Wednesday market.  When I lived in Ajijic, that tianguis was the highlight of my week.  Conversing with the vendors--don Rafa and his wife doña Tere, the young women who sold gorditas, the man who sold fresh fish and always had a sample of something to taste, the young man who sold great chicken, the yoghurt man and his wife--plus seeing so many of my Mexican friends and neighbors (I had a van and my neighbors often carpooled there and back with me).  I often saw ex-pat friends--people I only saw at the tianguis, we'd always stop to chat for a minute.  And the woman with the taco stand about midway through--I still remember her tacos.

The last time I was there, IMHO there was too much emphasis on arts and crafts and too little emphasis on what a tianguis is generally for: buying fresh provisions for the kitchen.  I don't know any tianguis--in Mexico City, in Morelia, in Pátzcuaro, in Oaxaca, in Guadalajara--where the produce is home-grown and brought to market.  The vendors are re-sellers, buying at wholesale in a mercado de abastos and reselling at a very, very small profit in the tianguis.  In Pátzcuaro, sellers do come from little towns around the area, even from Janitzio island, to sell certain home-grown or net-fished items--but only twice a week.  Same in Morelia, at the Mercado de Independencia--twice a week.  In Zaachila, Oaxaca and in San Cristóbal de las Casas, there are purely indigenous markets where people do bring their own goods to sell.  

I make it a point to shop in the tianguis wherever I am.  Deep relationships form between seller and buyer, jokes are shared between buyer and vendor, or between one buyer and another, produce is better, meat is better, fish is better, cheese, yoghurt, etc etc etc are better.  In Mexico City, due to illness I failed to go to my neighborhood tianguis for about six weeks.  When I was finally able to go back, one of the vendors reached out to hug me and said, "Ay señora, you're an older person and we thought something had happened to you!"  He was so relieved that I was back and not in the más allá.

Build relationships in your communities.  Shop your tianguis and your municipal market, not just the organic market or whatever upscale market you have.

And please note that the word is TIANGUIS: tea AHN geese.  One tianguis, two tianguis, three tianguis.  The word is based on a Náhuatl word and means street market.  Always the same in singular and plural.  NEVER tiangus and never tiangui.  

From me and your tianguis to you:   https://mexicocooks.typepad.com/mexico_cooks/2007/08/tianguis-mexico.html

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In an earlier post I referred  to the Chapala tianguis and it's wonders. You have quoted me out of context.I am speaking of the wonders of the Chapala Mercado in the Plaza, which can be frequented 7 days per week to enjoy all the things that you mentioned that you can only do for one day, in what I consider your apple as opposed to my orange.And I suggest again that the Chapala tianguis is larger and far superior to the Ajijic tianguis and less expensive as a bonus.

who wouldn't want to buy a belt from this guy at the Chapala tianguis. I bought 2.

who wouldn't buy a belt from this guy.jpg

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The tianguis is to be enjoyed. I don't think size has much to do with it.  We went to the tianguis  in Tuxcueca on the south side of the lake and there were many farmers there selling their produce.  As a gringo with a mexican wife we were a topic of conversation.  We enjoyed visiting with several of the vendors and many had spent time in the states.  We sampled the local tacos and brought much fresh vegetables home.  I spent 15 minutes haggling one vendor down 20 pesos than I gave his nino the 20 pesos. ja ja

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Just as an aside, for those who say this market is better, that one is too touristy, etc.

Please note that not everyone just hops in their car and then off they go to whatever spot suits them at the moment. Some of us do not have a car, and make our choices according to time/distance/ease of access. This is NOT a complaint, as I am car free by choice, just a statement. Some of us need flat, even surfaces to feel safe as we walk.

Over a decade ago, I used to live across the street from the Ajijic tianguis, and it was VERY convenient. Milk and perishables were available at El Torito and it was so very easy. Those were the days BEFORE WalMart. 

Then I moved to a location directly on the bus line but with NO tienditas nearby. I so wish there was one, but alas, not so. By the time I navigate the cobblestones into San Antonio to the little Mom and Pop stores, I am exhausted from trying to navigate the cobblestones and potholes. Then I have to carry it all back on the bus.

I have been to the Chapala tianguis and it IS bigger than the one in Ajijic, but it requires crossing a busy highway, and then navigating even more wicked streets. I went once and never again.  

I shop frequently at the Chapala Central Mercado and I like the convenience of it. No cobblestones ! 

The Ajijic tianguis is a once in a while thing now, as it seems to be more touristy and craftsy than I want or need. The streets, though, are actually walkable once you get in there. Too many people visiting and standing around in the middle of the walking path, oblivious to anyone else. I do not begrudge them the chatting, just take it to the side. I am assuming that these are the same people that make a knot in the middle of the aisle in WalMart or leave their cart in the middle of a row in CostCo. 😉

The Monday Market is nice enough, but I do my own cooking and don't need prepared food. The "Organic " Market out in La Huerta can take up to 40 minutes on a bus. I can walk to WalMart in 15.

For me, convenience and ease of access wins hands down over everything else these days. I am grateful for WalMart, no matter how much you may hiss and boo.

The convenience brought to me by the young Mexican family that runs the Lakeside Shopping Service to CostCo and then delivers to my door is so very much appreciated. The Pet store that delivers big bags of dog food is appreciated, as well. These are not Mom & Pop stores, and patronage of them in no way disparages the tiny abarrotes that abound in some areas. 

Remember that everyone has a different experience. YMMV

 

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My wife does almost all our marketing and we are within easy walking distance of the Chapala Mercado which she walks to daily. We can also walk to the Monday tianguis without crossing Madero. We have more than one  abbarote within spitting distance for fresh bolillos,milk,eggs,cerveza, etc. We chose our casa with due diligence for conveniences like this among other things of course. We use the car once per month for Walmart and or Soriana. When I was too infirm to drive, my wife took the bus to Walmart to make that big monthly purchase including paper products and cleaning fluids and easily took a taxi back to our casa. there are ways and there are ways.

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The vendors from Ajijic told me they went to Chapala as well. The fish guy once told me his selction was better in Ajijic because more people could afford fish that was more exensive.. IYears ago before Walmar and SOriana I used to go there every Wednesday , now I do not bother at all.

In San Cristobal I live a couple of block from the indigenous market and I shop there every day. They have a great selction from the hghlands for the cold veggies and fruit and from the low lands with all kinds of exotic fruit and veggies. Indigenous bring wild mushrooms, snailsm ants and all kinds if green leves veggies and  I would not miss one day there. We also get things from the abasto so it is heaven f you are a foodie.

When it come to imported items you can just forget it. so you have to adapt your cooking to what s available and fresh.

I enjoy markets that offer a lot of variety and unfortunately the tiabguys here are the samo samo..

 

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12 hours ago, bmh said:

The vendors from Ajijic told me they went to Chapala as well. The fish guy once told me his selction was better in Ajijic because more people could afford fish that was more exensive.. IYears ago before Walmar and SOriana I used to go there every Wednesday , now I do not bother at all.

In San Cristobal I live a couple of block from the indigenous market and I shop there every day. They have a great selction from the hghlands for the cold veggies and fruit and from the low lands with all kinds of exotic fruit and veggies. Indigenous bring wild mushrooms, snailsm ants and all kinds if green leves veggies and  I would not miss one day there. We also get things from the abasto so it is heaven f you are a foodie.

When it come to imported items you can just forget it. so you have to adapt your cooking to what s available and fresh.

I enjoy markets that offer a lot of variety and unfortunately the tiabguys here are the samo samo..

 

Interesting, because there are at least 4 fish guys at the Chapala tianguis,one of which usually arrives after 10 and parks on Madero because he drives all the way from San Blas to sell his fresh flash frozen sea food.not of the cheap variety. the fish guys in this picture just sold me a red snapper which they skinned and filleted in front of me. No that's not the snapper he's holding up. And there are rich Mexican people who can buy and sell alleged moneyed people from Ajijic 10+ times over. they send their servants to buy the expensive fish in Chapala tianguis.

 

got a red snapper from these guys.jpg

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On 5/31/2019 at 12:27 PM, Xena said:

There is no organic certification by the government (or anyone else). “Organic” is taken on faith and anyone can use the term. Also, some pesticides banned in the U.S. are still used here. 

The Mexican government does have an organic certification program. It is Agricultura Mexico. There will be a number like MX-BIO-132 . Also the new Organico Sagarpa Mexico. In fact Mexico is number 4 in the world in organic production. Locals here won't pay the cost. National brands like Mr Lucky produce have the certification.

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Pedro the man in the photo told me he had a better selection in AJijic....because he could sell more expensive fsh there-- Does not matter to me because I have a fish store by the house now so I do not go to the tianguis any longer. I do not go by preconceive ideas about one place or another, just saying what the fish man from the tianguis told me. Nothing less nothing more.

That was several years ago, I do not go to the tianguis any longer so who knows now..

 

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Chiapas has a lot of organic coffee farms and also large organic ranch. I would think there ae some control because the coffee farmers I know do not use any chemicals and some are losing their plantation due to the roya and still do not put any chemicals to save the trees..

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1 minute ago, bmh said:

Pedro the man in the photo told me he had a better selection in AJijic....because he could sell more expensive fsh there-- Does not matter to me because I have a fish store by the house now so I do not go to the tianguis any longer. I do not go by preconceive ideas about one place or another, just saying what the fish man from the tianguis told me. Nothing less nothing more.

That was several years ago, I do not go to the tianguis any longer so who knows now..

 

I suggest that he told you what he thought you wanted to here to make you feel better.

HAPPYJILLIN

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I know a man whose family has the largest organic ranches n the State , I ll be there Friday and I am fgong to ask him about certification.. I am curious now.. I know that people who just grown food in general use tones of chemicals.. I see it in their houses and I see the trucks when they deliver them..

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Pedro you are the one with the inferiority complex and the chip on the shoulder, as i said I do not care, I buy fish at the fish store near my house. I was looking for an expensive fish and ask him if he sold it in Chapala. He said no.

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Just now, bmh said:

Pedro you are the one with the inferiority complex and the chip on the shoulder, as i said I do not care, I buy fish at the fish store near my house. I was looking for an expenseive fish and ask him if he sold it in Chapala. He said no.

And I ,justjillin ,said that there is more than one fish vendor at the Chapala tianguis. Passing on information including pictures, is what i am doing. I have never felt inferior to anyone nor do I carry Belgian fries on my shoulder.

justjillin

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19 hours ago, happyjillin said:

In an earlier post I referred  to the Chapala tianguis and it's wonders. You have quoted me out of context.I am speaking of the wonders of the Chapala Mercado in the Plaza, which can be frequented 7 days per week to enjoy all the things that you mentioned that you can only do for one day, in what I consider your apple as opposed to my orange.And I suggest again that the Chapala tianguis is larger and far superior to the Ajijic tianguis and less expensive as a bonus.

who wouldn't want to buy a belt from this guy at the Chapala tianguis. I bought 2.

who wouldn't buy a belt from this guy.jpg

I quoted your post in its entirety.  I didn't see another post.

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On 5/31/2019 at 11:16 AM, happyjillin said:

The great shake of the Chapala Mercado is that it's all in one place in el centro plaza and because of that other stores have located around it too. You even have a choice of 4 butchers right in it as well as 2 chicken butchers one of them carries rabbit and quail eggs. 2 fish mongers Tacos,roto chicken,baked goods,desserts,fruit/veggies,flowers and plants birria,menudo and a couple of popular gringo friendly restaurants. 7 days/week.

No Liana you just quoted this to make your long post about the joys of the Ajijic tianguis when in fact the Chapala Mercado has nothing to do with any tianguis in any way shape or form and obviously available for our marketing,vendor chatting,friends and strangers chatting all week as opposed to one day.

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You just do not get it Liana, the rich Mexicans from Ajijic send their servants to buy expensive fish  to Chapala as it is cheaper.. Another case where the Pedro logic prevails...or by the way it is also cheaper because the guy drives every day from San Blas with the fresh fish in his truck.. and we all know that red snapper is the best fish you can buy and on and on😅

Imagine driving 4 h to go and 4 to come back just to gets us some fres fish from San Blas when the stuff arrives every day in Zapopan..just as fresh...It is interesting that all the tianguis fish retailers say they come from San Blas but the stores buy the same stuff just as fresh from the mercado del mar ..

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