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Bisbee Gal

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Thanks for sharing. I am happily surprised that this is being allowed, without the person who came to the US illegally maybe 5 to 20 years ago, being deported.

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3 hours ago, johanson said:

Thanks for sharing. I am happily surprised that this is being allowed, without the person who came to the US illegally maybe 5 to 20 years ago, being deported.

Some way you missed that deportations are basically criminal elements, at least that has been the case since the new administration took over, no matter what you have read from fake news.  Can't speak for the 8 previous years.

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Thanks for posting this article Bisbee Gal.  I keep a place in Michoacán and in this pueblo I know many older Michoacanos who desperately want to see their children one last time.  I will go there on Friday and inform them of this program.  

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Many years ago when i lived in San Antonio Ocampo, Mich, which is east of Zamora up in the sierra, there were more vehicles with US Indiana placas than Michoacán.

They would go up to Gary/Calumet to work in the steel mills and travel freely back and forth to visit and be with family and the old folks.  Of course, no one who stayed behind in Mexico could afford a vehicle but they would bring them down and leave with the indiana plates.

Now with the strict enforcement of vehicle importation into Mexico and immigration policies in the  US, those days are over and families are much more isolated from each other than they were 30/40 years ago.  Two or three trips back and forth every year were not uncommon.

 

 

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9 hours ago, slainte39 said:

Many years ago when i lived in San Antonio Ocampo, Mich, which is east of Zamora up in the sierra, there were more vehicles with US Indiana placas than Michoacán.

They would go up to Gary/Calumet to work in the steel mills and travel freely back and forth to visit and be with family and the old folks.  Of course, no one who stayed behind in Mexico could afford a vehicle but they would bring them down and leave with the indiana plates.

Now with the strict enforcement of vehicle importation into Mexico and immigration policies in the  US, those days are over and families are much more isolated from each other than they were 30/40 years ago.  Two or three trips back and forth every year were not uncommon.

 

 

I remember those days, slainte39.  Out in the sierra there were always license plates from all over the USA.  The economic quality of hometown life was better, too, as so many who worked in the USA sent or brought substantial funds to relatives back home.  

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9 hours ago, More Liana said:

I remember those days, slainte39.  Out in the sierra there were always license plates from all over the USA.  The economic quality of hometown life was better, too, as so many who worked in the USA sent or brought substantial funds to relatives back home.  

Absolutely, and the xxxx-in-chief, or one of his xenophobic stooges, has indicated they would like to stop that flow of funds, altogether.

Sorry, my American friends on the board, for taking such a Mexican point of view opinion. but that´s just who I am.

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3 hours ago, slainte39 said:

Absolutely, and the xxxx-in-chief, or one of his xenophobic stooges, has indicated they would like to stop that flow of funds, altogether.

Sorry, my American friends on the board, for taking such a Mexican point of view opinion. but that´s just who I am.

That's just who I am, too.  Glad to know you here.

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11 hours ago, slainte39 said:

Absolutely, and the xxxx-in-chief, or one of his xenophobic stooges, has indicated they would like to stop that flow of funds, altogether.

Sorry, my American friends on the board, for taking such a Mexican point of view opinion. but that´s just who I am.

I am an American on this board who has gratefully made my home in Mexico for 11 years. Hate to break the news to you but I see things the way you do and every foreigner I know feels the same way. I just assumed it was a decent human point of view. 

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I grew up when travel between Mexico, USA, and Canada was quite free; simply a pause and a smile, and no passport needed.  I think it was better for all three countries in many ways. Living near the Quebec border, we often went to Montreal to shop, or to see shows, etc. It was our closest big city. As a young adult, with a family, we continued that habit.  When the occasion presented itself, we visited Tijuana in about 1962 or 3.  It was still the same procedure, with no passport needed to re-enter the USA. I never even got a passport until about 1975, but had already seen a lot of the world with just military orders in my pocket, even though I was just off duty and being a tourist.  Yes, my wife and kids did need passports, from about 1960 onward, to accompany me. That was expected for much of the world, but not for North America. Why complicate things?

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On 5/30/2019 at 9:31 AM, RVGRINGO said:

I grew up when travel between Mexico, USA, and Canada was quite free; simply a pause and a smile, and no passport needed.  I think it was better for all three countries in many ways. Living near the Quebec border, we often went to Montreal to shop, or to see shows, etc. It was our closest big city. As a young adult, with a family, we continued that habit.  When the occasion presented itself, we visited Tijuana in about 1962 or 3.  It was still the same procedure, with no passport needed to re-enter the USA. I never even got a passport until about 1975, but had already seen a lot of the world with just military orders in my pocket, even though I was just off duty and being a tourist.  Yes, my wife and kids did need passports, from about 1960 onward, to accompany me. That was expected for much of the world, but not for North America. Why complicate things?

Because millions of people have chosen not to respect the immigration laws of other countries.  Because other million can't seem to get along without dope.  That's why.

It is really too damn bad, I am of similar age and remember visiting Mexico frequently with just a driver's license.  In those days the border towns were pretty safe, full of great restaurants and things to see and do, and cheap booze.  Even as recently as 14 years ago we visited Nuevo Progreso frequently with our RV buddies, ate out, had a great time and helped to support the local economy.  Before that we would visit Reynosa with my wife's father and do the same thing.

Would never do that today.

We have all paid the price for border insecurity and the insane level of drug use in the U.S and Canada.  It is very sad.

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8 hours ago, Mainecoons said:

Because millions of people have chosen not to respect the immigration laws of other countries.  Because other million can't seem to get along without dope.  That's why.

It is really too damn bad, I am of similar age and remember visiting Mexico frequently with just a driver's license.  In those days the border towns were pretty safe, full of great restaurants and things to see and do, and cheap booze.  Even as recently as 14 years ago we visited Nuevo Progreso frequently with our RV buddies, ate out, had a great time and helped to support the local economy.  Before that we would visit Reynosa with my wife's father and do the same thing.

Would never do that today.

We have all paid the price for border insecurity and the insane level of drug use in the U.S and Canada.  It is very sad.

Progreso is still ( or once again) fine. No thank you to Reynosa, too much chance of crossfire. Somehow,  as RV said a while back, that bridge over to Progreso seems to have gotten longer...or something.

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Yes, both longer and steeper.  😫  Otherwise, it is just fine in Nuevo Progresso, with the usual crowds going for dental visits and lunch, etc.  The pedestrian lane is usually "no delay" to a maximum of "25 minutes", every time I check.

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