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For the last week I have been having issues with my Internet connection I have the same backbone contract I had when I was in my office in Ajijic back in 1997. Over the last couple of weeks I had been experiencing lots of latency and packet loss, I had been in touch with my account manager and the solution and (issue) was pretty simple to resolve. It seems that Telmex  (uninet) has been switching their network over to IPv6. While most people may not care about this change, it will make significant performance improvements that should be noticeable for Telmex customers or anyone else using the Uninet  or Telnor backbone.

There are some significant performance advantages that should help improve speed and network performance plus less data loss (packet loss) that's because packet fragmentation is taken care of at the node level and not along the network. This should make for zippier performance. Just from some tests I was doing today it seems that most of their primary network is now all IPv6. This will also improve data security, better VOIP and better data flow across networks.

Considering that IPv6 was only made the standard in 2017 I must admit I'm pretty impressed that Telmex has adopted it so fast.

 

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Rod, it may be called..... competition!

P.S.  You said that you were having problems... then did some G2 and found that the 'solution was pretty simple to resolve'. Does this mean that one must 'do something' to take advantage of IPv6 and therefore get 'significant performance improvements' from their Telmex internet connection?

 

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11 minutes ago, RickS said:

Rod, it may be called..... competition!

P.S.  You said that you were having problems... then did some G2 and found that the 'solution was pretty simple to resolve'. Does this mean that one must 'do something' to take advantage of IPv6 and therefore get 'significant performance improvements' from their Telmex internet connection?

 

In my case I still have a commercial account so it was a matter of physically switching it over. From what I know it will be a gradual network wide rollout, if in fact it  has not already rolled out in other areas.

An easy way to check would be going to https://www.whatismyip.com

You should get something like this.

Your IP Address is

2806:103e:1c:1c56:321d:d5fd:2c1d:27c5

or

Your Public IPv6 is: 2806:103e:1c:1c56:321d:d5fd:2c1d:27c5
Your IPv4 is: 187.201.67.87

I know a lot of people are suffering lakeside with Telmex connectivity, especially those in San Antonio and Chula Vista, they are still using a lot of the old infrastructure that was installed for me when I started Lagunanet 20 + years ago so there is a lot old copper etc. I would assume that in a few more months that will change with new infrastructure along with a better network.

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5 minutes ago, rod.collins said:

An easy way to check would be going to https://www.whatismyip.com

In Chapala Centro with Telmex it says:  Your IPv6 is: Not Detected

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In Riberas I have both a public IPv6 number and an  IPv4 number. I have never complained much about the speed I'm getting (which is 20.0 mbps down and 4.5 mbps. up) but my complaints have always been about customer service. I hope people get improved speeds with the arrival of iLox AND improved customer service. That was, after all, the whole point. Competition is good.

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Thanks for the info, as here in San Antonio my internet (1.6 down, .3 up, at best) has at least been working reliably, until 3 days ago.  Now it is 75% out of service....on top of Telcel being out or down to H+ for most of SAT, too.  

About a month ago there were a bunch of muchachos running cables outside my house (La Paz) into the direction of Riberas.  My non-Spanish speaking husband ascertained that these are NEW cables for NEW upgrade of internet service.  We jumped for joy, thinking it was Ilox.  But we were told by Ilox it isn't (Sad face emoji).  I am now thinking--hoping--this is actually upgraded cable wires and San Antonio might see some kind of improvement in the next few months????? One can only hope. 

 

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2 hours ago, kimanjome said:

Thanks for the info, as here in San Antonio my internet (1.6 down, .3 up, at best) has at least been working reliably, until 3 days ago.  Now it is 75% out of service....on top of Telcel being out or down to H+ for most of SAT, too.  

About a month ago there were a bunch of muchachos running cables outside my house (La Paz) into the direction of Riberas.  My non-Spanish speaking husband ascertained that these are NEW cables for NEW upgrade of internet service.  We jumped for joy, thinking it was Ilox.  But we were told by Ilox it isn't (Sad face emoji).  I am now thinking--hoping--this is actually upgraded cable wires and San Antonio might see some kind of improvement in the next few months????? One can only hope. 

 

🙏

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Great picture, vetteforron,. Sure wouldn't want to be walking underneath. I could imagine all of the bird droppings below them.

  • Haha 1

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That really is a great photo! And all facing the same way... concert? or the breeze?

  • Haha 1

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1 hour ago, johanson said:

Great picture, vetteforron,. Sure wouldn't want to be walking underneath. I could imagine all of the bird droppings below them.

You have had a vivid imagination for as long as I have known you.

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2 hours ago, Ferret said:

That really is a great photo! And all facing the same way... concert? or the breeze?

Concert for another type of breeze.  LOL

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3 hours ago, vetteforron said:

I know why I am having problems...everybody is on line.

 

 

IMG_1389(1).JPG

Representation of the different levels of society.

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IPv6 access is turned on by default in Windows. So Rod's situation is probably a bit different than the average user's. My own IP search is the same as Angus, at the moment: Not detected, even though Windows is ready for it. It will be interesting to see how things progress.

You can check your own by following Rod's link, which is very quick, and/or by going into "Open network & Internet settings" on your PC. Why double check? Because not detected might mean it's turned off in your computer.

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17 minutes ago, ComputerGuy said:

My own IP search is the same as Angus, at the moment: Not detected, even though Windows is ready for it.

This weekend mine changed to:

  • Your Public IPv6 is: 2806:103e:e:4c04:916e:fcb1:ce8f:b05
  • Your IPv4 is: 187.139.172.170
  • Location: Tlalpan, CMX MX 

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Any chance you are able to compare your before and after speed?

My Google searching says IPv4 and IPv6 provide the same speed, all things considered.

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1
4 minutes ago, ComputerGuy said:

Any chance you are able to compare your before and after speed?

I tried speedtest a few times and it seems the same except it peaks quicker now. Still ends about 30 down.

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Thanks. My guess is it is pinging faster, but still takes the same amount of time to download.

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12 minutes ago, ComputerGuy said:

Thanks. My guess is it is pinging faster, but still takes the same amount of time to download.

Ping was and remains 11 ms.

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At this point, I don't have enough background in this stuff to suggest another answer. There is no logical reason why it would peak faster. That doesn't mean there is  no answer, other than perception of speed.

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50 minutes ago, ComputerGuy said:

At this point, I don't have enough background in this stuff to suggest another answer. There is no logical reason why it would peak faster. That doesn't mean there is  no answer, other than perception of speed.

IPv6 is more efficient speed wise,however it may not make a big difference to the average user,  but as whole its more efficient, packets that are normally bad get discarded along the way (from point to point routers), this can cause packet collisions and slow down the network this could explain faster peaking times, this alone improves network efficiency by at least 70%. With IPv6 it discards packets at the hub itself (router) making data transfer seamless. The other benefit is no more NAT or having to worry about IP conflicts over the network.

This is often an issue which some Telmex users may have experienced, often times people will say they have no Internet, this is often caused by a network IP conflict, the user has to unplug the router and plug it back in to get another IP,  IPv6 eliminates a lot of these nuisances.

One of the biggest advantages going from IPv4 to IP v6 is that traditional packet data was sent wtih 64Kb, IPv6 can accommodate from 4 gb to 32 gb which is HUGE. This should allow Telmex or any other provider to roll out better and more efficient networks with higher data speeds with solid reliability.

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The Benefits of IPv6

While increasing the pool of addresses is one of the most often-talked about benefit of IPv6, there are other important technological changes in IPv6 that will improve the IP protocol:

  • No more NAT (Network Address Translation)
  • Auto-configuration
  • No more private address collisions
  • Better multicast routing
  • Simpler header format
  • Simplified, more efficient routing
  • True quality of service (QoS), also called "flow labeling"
  • Built-in authentication and privacy support
  • Flexible options and extensions
  • Easier administration (say good-bye to DHCP)

The Difference Between IPv4 and IPv6 Addresses

An IP address is binary numbers but can be stored as text for human readers.  For example, a 32-bit numeric address (IPv4) is written in decimal as four numbers separated by periods. Each number can be zero to 255. For example, 1.160.10.240 could be an IP address.

IPv6 addresses are 128-bit IP address written in hexadecimal and separated by colons. An example IPv6 address could be written like this: 3ffe:1900:4545:3:200:f8ff:fe21:67cf.

https://www.webopedia.com/DidYouKnow/Internet/ipv6_ipv4_difference.html

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Rod, I appreciate your comments. They are very helpful. Tiny, sure, I coulda looked it up, too, but not being an expert, all I would be doing is giving you a Google search answer; I don't see the point.

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1 hour ago, ComputerGuy said:

Tiny, sure, I coulda looked it up, too, but not being an expert, all I would be doing is giving you a Google search answer; I don't see the point

So you never look up anything and posted it?

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