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Le Honneur Bistro


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3 hours ago, CHILLIN said:

How much do you think it will cost for a hamburger "Royale" avec fromage et pomme frites?

Haha.  If they imported a few real French waiters they'd probably toss you out on your ear for asking for such a thing there. The place in Chapalita was very upscale and expensive.  We need more places Lakeside where people leave the shorts at home. The escargot I've had were worth every sou.

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21 minutes ago, Rick Sanchez said:

And yet, some of the top chefs in the world claim a good hamburger is one of their favourite meals.

Not all great cooks are pretentious, and they certainly know enough to enjoy the "more simple" foods.

A hamburger is not haute cuisine.

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14 minutes ago, Rick Sanchez said:

And that diminishes it? Price is not a factor in the quality of a good meal. 

You have the attitude of someone who judges another human by how much money they're worth and not who they are as a person.

Good food is good food, snobbery is snobbery. 

We are talking about a haute cuisine French restaurant. I do not think you know what that is, what the cooking principles involved are, what the philosophies are. What you are saying about hamburgers or whatever makes no sense in this context.  It's not at all about just coming up with popular tasty items and putting them on the menu!  

I do not judge people by wealth, and I am by no means wealthy. I said nothing about judging anyone by money. That all came from your head. Ditto your comments about snobbery.  

I did not make this post to argue with you or anyone else, just to inform. If I insulted anyone as you allege, then I truly apologize to them.

 

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12 hours ago, El Bizco said:

We are talking about a haute cuisine French restaurant. I do not think you know what that is, what the cooking principles involved are, what the philosophies are. What you are saying about hamburgers or whatever makes no sense in this context.  It's not at all about just coming up with popular tasty items and putting them on the menu!  

I do not judge people by wealth, and I am by no means wealthy. I said nothing about judging anyone by money. That all came from your head. Ditto your comments about snobbery.  

I did not make this post to argue with you or anyone else, just to inform. If I insulted anyone as you allege, then I truly apologize to them.

 

I'm very sorry. I must apologize. 

I posted while in a rude and snarky mood. It was uncalled for. 

You were just providing restaurant information and did not for one minute deserve my vitriol. 

Peace. 

 

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There was a French bistro restaurant I liked to go to in Vancouver. Most of the waiters spoke English with a strong Parisian accent. Think goofy Inspector Clouseau movie type accents. They must have been actors, because no matter how hard you tried, even speaking  to them in French, they would not break their character. No self respecting Parisian would talk that way.

I think real "french fries" using Marie Piper potatoes and slowly fried in rendered duck fat is considered pretty haute cuisine, especially for a bistro menu, especially if they were served with a good steak.

There is another movie where a customer orders "biftec tartare", based on the menu and waiter's description, then is horrified to find it is all raw meat. He asked the kitchen to fry it a bit, which of course they refuse to do.

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Duck fats, animal fats are "rendered" to reduce solids and raise  the smoking/burning point. Butter "rendered" is ghee. McDonalds use to use rendered beef fat/tallow for their fries, which are much better tasting than today's vegetable oils.

What is a "french fry" to you?

Jeez - tough crowd, must be the weather.

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9 minutes ago, CHILLIN said:

Duck fats, animal fats are "rendered" to reduce solids and raise  the smoking/burning point. Butter "rendered" is ghee. McDonalds use to use rendered beef fat/tallow for their fries, which are much better tasting than today's vegetable oils.

That is like frying/browning  beef or pork in rendered bacon fat.

 

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Yes, McDonald's used to do that. And go ahead and use duck fat, if you like. I don't care. But your point was that unless it's a Marie Piper, it's not "real". That's just categorically incorrect, and I was not arguing with you. Rather, I was pointing out a fact.

A french fry is a french fry. If it's different to you than to everyone else, well, enjoy.

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The hard fat of beef is called suet.  In the old days the cafes used suet to grease their fryers when making hamburgers.  They tasted great and I am sure led to hardening of your arteries.  I have a recipe from my grandmother for making chili.  It starts with 3 cups of suet.  I have made it a time or two and everyone agrees it tastes great.  I just don't tell them about the suet.

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When suet fell out of favour in the kitchen, my grandmother would roll a chunk in seed and put it out for the birds. Which made the squirrels very happy. Which kept my Grandfather hard at work, devising new birdfeeders to keep squirrels out.

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1 hour ago, CHILLIN said:

Google duck fat fries, and read the reviews. They are a big deal.

If this new bistro puts them on the menu, they will be a big seller.

Nobody said they don't taste great. They are still not "the real thing" you seem to think they are.

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8 hours ago, CHILLIN said:

What is a "french fry" to you?

"The name French fries implies that this dish can be traced back to France; however, the origins of this ubiquitous dish can be traced back to Belgium. It is rumored that French fries received that name during WWI. At that time, American soldiers were introduced to the fried potatoes in Belgium, but because they thought they were situated in France (due to the fact that part of Belgium speaks French), the soldiers nicknamed these fried potatoes as French fries, instead of calling them fried potatoes."

"The quality of Belgian frites is very important, and the final result depends upon the temperature before cooking. The fries cannot be frozen or too soft before frying, as they need the perfect balance to ensure that once fried, they are crispy and delicious. The perfect Belgian frites are also no more than one centimeter thick, and the procedure involves frying the potatoes twice. In fact, they are even prepared in a special oil (animal fat); mostly from a mix of horse and cow fat."

https://theculturetrip.com/europe/belgium/articles/10-things-you-did-not-know-about-belgian-fries/

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I just read an article about what is supposed to be the top gourmet restaurant in the USA. One picture "root vegetables aged with a beef tallow coating" looked like carrots and parsnips, all hanging with little strings, like salamis.

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