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Jitomate Restaurant

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Gerard has recently added to his menu with 5 or 6 pasta dishes and 3 panzarotti dishes.
Both home made pastas and panzarottis range from 120p to 170p and are very tasty. Well worth checking out.
Gerard is celebrating their 2nd anniversary on April 15. Some free giveaways including margaritas and snacks.
Their regular  menu is available plus they will have live music until 9pm
 

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Closed Tues and Wed

open for lunch and dinner.  I think until 9:00pm

 

west Ajijic. Just past La Reserva development . On lake side

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Next to Que Ganga, LCS bazaar. Ate there today, new menus with tempting food "not yet available."  Hmm...... I was with a good friend so a happy time - okay food. Not memorable.

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On 4/5/2019 at 11:15 PM, Rick Sanchez said:

Food and menu are just "okay" .

No reason to go back with so many other better choices around town, and I live on the west-end. 

 

Jitomate did not have a menu until April 4th or 5th and even then most of the new menu was not available (his wife jumped the gun and set them out early). Just pizzas, a few lonches and the occasional special all posted on the wall so I am confused by your comment. Now everything is available on the new menu maybe you should try it again. Or maybe you are confusing it with another restaurant

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I think Gerard is an excellent chef. His prices are high, but I have not been disappointed by the taste and quality of his food.

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We went for the prime rib this past Friday. Very tender and delicious. Must be US beef! Great mash potatoes, horseradish, au jus and a popover. Salad was good too with their dressing. Cost of prime rib was $150p per 100g. 

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Went again on Saturday. He could not make me the fettucine with whisky, so I opted for the alfredo, plus shrimp. 9 succulent, large and properly grill-cooked shrimp were added for 40p. Still, 210 for an alfredo with noodles is quite up there, but the food was excellent. The spinach lasagna was about what you'd expect from spinach lasagna. I am not sure I would know how to elevate that dish.

Service was "good". I say that in quotes, because while two sauces were brought to our table immediately, it took over 20 minutes to get 4 puny pieces of garlic croutons to use with them. And that was after flagging the waiter down. I certainly understand that Gerard needs time to cook his way, but an appetizer should not come out just before your Caesar salad (also an excellent dressing but supremely pricey at 95p for five leaves).

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8 of us had lunch there Thursday. Ravioli with meat filling and tomato sauce was perfect. Others had spinach lasagna and pizzas. Appetiser of serano ham, roasted tomatoes and baby asparagus was outstanding. Gerard said he is getting Sonora prime-rib and having someone in Guadalajara age it for 2 months. Plans are to have the prime-rib all weekend and not just Fridays. Also prime-rib burgers.

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Just my opinion, of course, but making prime rib into burgers is a waste of a good steak.

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12 hours ago, ComputerGuy said:

Just my opinion, of course, but making prime rib into burgers is a waste of a good steak.

Except for "molachos"        :D

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14 hours ago, tomgates said:

8 of us had lunch there Thursday. Ravioli with meat filling and tomato sauce was perfect. Others had spinach lasagna and pizzas. Appetiser of serano ham, roasted tomatoes and baby asparagus was outstanding. Gerard said he is getting Sonora prime-rib and having someone in Guadalajara age it for 2 months. Plans are to have the prime-rib all weekend and not just Fridays. Also prime-rib burgers.

I have never heard of anyone aging prime rib for two months,  I don't know how you could do it? Aged beef carcass usually hangs for 2 to 3 weeks.

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Don Shula restaurants in the US "claim" to age their beef 45 days.  Supposedly that´s why their prices start at 60 dollars for the smallest, cheapest piece of meat.

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23 hours ago, ComputerGuy said:

Just my opinion, of course, but making prime rib into burgers is a waste of a good steak.

Except that it is a roast. B)  One good thing about Gerard's is the atmosphere, IMO - good vibes. I'm not sure whether the mushroom with tomatoes and cheese is still available but it was excellent. I really like the spinach lasagna and the regular salad is good and filling. It is the only good salad I've had yet in the area. [not that I've been all over] There may be some confusion over the aging of the prime rib. It is likely cut from already aged beef. We killed a steer back in Canada and hung for about 1 month...delicious; big difference if aged.

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There are basically two kinds of ageing processes for high end beef cuts..wet and dry , They work just as  they sound but are intrinsically different , most higher end cuts destined for restaurants  are aged for at least 2 - 3 weeks . Wet ageing is  simple ,the specific cut large or small is vacuum packed and left to sit in its own juices ( blood )  under refrigeration for  different periods of time depending on size .It can help with tenderness but sitting  in the  blood may also change the flavor .In larger cuts rib eye ,NY strip and sirloin etc...this is not a problem as they will be trimmed . Dry is the real deal with big changes in tenderness and flavor , it is however a much more expensive process .Special refrigerated cabinets should be used to control temp and humidity in order to prevent spoilage etc.  As the meat dries the beef  flavor intensifies ,the cells and connective tissues breakdown ..the meat becomes very tender . It can take up to a month ,some restaurants even longer ,as it dries it shrinks up to 25% - the mould must be trimmed .All these factors time ,equipment and shrinkage make the cost extortionate. Personally l find  long dry aged meat is too “ gamey “ and rich for my taste . For either of these processes to work you need good beef to begin with.... you can’t make a silk purse etc.

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Excellent explanation.  We poor people in Oklahoma could never afford the dry method.

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You can always try marinating your steak in pureed pineapple for one hour before rinsing off and cooking. The enzymes break down tissue so dont let it marinate too long.

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Not sure why one would go the trouble of pureeing a pineapple, when you can just buy a bottle of tenderizer, containing papain, the active ingredient in papaya, not  pineapples. Further, you fork the grains into the steak so it works on the inside, and avoid having the outside go mushy. I would assume soaking it in juice is not going to let it get inside very much at all.

Just make sure it is salt free...

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32 minutes ago, ComputerGuy said:

Not sure why one would go the trouble of pureeing a pineapple, when you can just buy a bottle of tenderizer, containing papain, the active ingredient in pineapples. Further, you fork the grains into the steak so it works on the inside, and avoid having the outside go mushy. I would assume soaking it in juice is not going to let it get inside very much at all.

Just make sure it is salt free...

Papain is actually an extract from papaya. In the 60's Swift Canadian injected it into old cattle including Judas bulls just before kill to tenderize the entire beast. Yes I was there.

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Back to Jitomate...had their meat raviolis, and the are the best I've had in Mexico.  Excellent pizza as well, with the best pepperoni.

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On 7/15/2019 at 10:22 AM, happyjillin said:

Papain is actually an extract from papaya. In the 60's Swift Canadian injected it into old cattle including Judas bulls just before kill to tenderize the entire beast. Yes I was there.

Ack. You are quiet correct. Apologies.

EDIT: I love a good typo. "Quite".

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