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Need opinions on Chapala Haciendas


sputnik
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Were thinking of buying lot in Chapala Haciendas.  Read their phamplet on Rules for building, regulations and behavior laws.  Question:  Seems so restrictive. Maybe its just me but it seems  like i would be living back in the U.S.  Do they really enforce all those rules?  If anyone lives there, please I would welcome your input.

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1 hour ago, Willie said:

Might also want to do your due diligence on soil stability, water supply/quality...most of the normal day to day living expectations....from an old realtor.

And security

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Oh, lord, here we go again. Check the area. Talk to the neighbors. No, the rules aren't restrictive; most are common sense. The majority of us who live here like it. This area is really hopping with a lot of construction and "gentrification." It's not a gated community, but that's never been a guarantee of protection. Use common sense and take precautions like you would anywhere. The water is supplied by the fracc's own well. We sometimes have a problem with a leak that needs to be fixed, but our water supply is pretty consistent. Willie mentioned land stability and he's absolutely correct. While some homes, like ours, were built on solid lava rock, others were built on the equivalent of shifting sands. Like anywhere, quality land in one spot doesn't guarantee the same for another. GET A HOME INSPECTION regardless of where you choose. No, it's not perfect, but it's nice to be away from the traffic and noise of Chapala and Ajijic.

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34 minutes ago, Tingting said:

Oh, lord, here we go again. Check the area. Talk to the neighbors. No, the rules aren't restrictive; most are common sense. The majority of us who live here like it. This area is really hopping with a lot of construction and "gentrification." It's not a gated community, but that's never been a guarantee of protection. Use common sense and take precautions like you would anywhere. The water is supplied by the fracc's own well. We sometimes have a problem with a leak that needs to be fixed, but our water supply is pretty consistent. Willie mentioned land stability and he's absolutely correct. While some homes, like ours, were built on solid lava rock, others were built on the equivalent of shifting sands. Like anywhere, quality land in one spot doesn't guarantee the same for another. GET A HOME INSPECTION regardless of where you choose. No, it's not perfect, but it's nice to be away from the traffic and noise of Chapala and Ajijic.

There really needs to be a site that list each frac and condos regulations where prospective can view the rules cost and restrictions. This way buyers could eliminate certain areas early and easily and get on with their search. 

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44 minutes ago, Tingting said:

Oh, lord, here we go again. Check the area. Talk to the neighbors. No, the rules aren't restrictive; most are common sense. The majority of us who live here like it. This area is really hopping with a lot of construction and "gentrification." It's not a gated community, but that's never been a guarantee of protection. Use common sense and take precautions like you would anywhere. The water is supplied by the fracc's own well. We sometimes have a problem with a leak that needs to be fixed, but our water supply is pretty consistent. Willie mentioned land stability and he's absolutely correct. While some homes, like ours, were built on solid lava rock, others were built on the equivalent of shifting sands. Like anywhere, quality land in one spot doesn't guarantee the same for another. GET A HOME INSPECTION regardless of where you choose. No, it's not perfect, but it's nice to be away from the traffic and noise of Chapala and Ajijic.

ok, thank you so very much for all this information.  MANY things we like about it.  Maybe we just freaked out when we saw all the "rules".  Have talked to several that live there and they love it so that is why we looked at a lot.  Yes, we live in Riberas.  Want to get away from the traffic.  Thank you very much again.

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3 hours ago, sputnik said:

Were thinking of buying lot in Chapala Haciendas.  Read their phamplet on Rules for building, regulations and behavior laws.  Question:  Seems so restrictive. Maybe its just me but it seems  like i would be living back in the U.S.  Do they really enforce all those rules?  If anyone lives there, please I would welcome your input.

Some people love the rules and restrictions of a homeowners association and the “protection” provided by them. Others feel rules are “restrictive” and chafe under them. Since you state the rules seem so restrictive and are asking if they will  “really” be enforced I would guess you are among the latter. I would carefully consider building on a lot in a development with an association. Even if you were assured this association is lax and easy going, board memberships change and it becomes a whole new ballgame. 

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The major concern would be for unstable ground, as it is a common problem in that subdivision.  Many lots are on rather unstable rubble and 'fill', with a tendency to shift.  We looked at a home there, which needed "a bit of TLC". It was severely cracked and tilted. We thought it time to move on to another area. We were also concerned about the prospect of being so 'car-dependent' for every little thing, and by not having the ambiance of a nearby plaza, or various 'tiendas', etc.  That is when we decided upon Chapala centro.   :)

You know us, and the rest of the story:  A happy decade!

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3 minutes ago, RVGRINGO said:

The major concern would be for unstable ground, as it is a common problem in that subdivision.  Many lots are on rather unstable rubble and 'fill', with a tendency to shift.  We looked at a home there, that needed "a bit of TLC". It was severely cracked and tilted. We thought it time to move on to another area. We were also concerned about the prospect of being so 'car-dependent' for every little thing, and by not having the ambiance of a nearby plaza, or various 'tiendas', etc.  That is when we decided upon Chapala centro.   :)

You know the rest of the story:  A happy decade!

Hello RVGringo !!!  This is Barbara !!!  Yes you had a lovely home, and saludos to your wife.  We thought to sell our 2 story as we are getting older.  ALL our friends are in Chapala.  Love Chapala.  Thank you so so much for your input.  It is invaluable.  Yes one lot we looked at our builder said he would have to bring in other dirt to put on top.

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If the lot is not already level and with underlying rock (not fill), I would run away from it.

I can appreciate the desire for a single storey, as I am several years ahead of both of you.  

Give us a shout, if you come to visit in Texas again.

B&L

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9 minutes ago, RVGRINGO said:

If the lot is not already level and with underlying rock (not fill), I would run away from it.

I can appreciate the desire for a single storey, as I am several years ahead of both of you.  

Give us a shout, if you come to visit in Texas again.

B&L

ok, yes thank you for your advice.  Yes I was wondering how you liked Texas.......hope to see you guys again !!!

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1 hour ago, sputnik said:

yes we just talked about that yesterday.  When board members change, pass a law that is terrible....people move....housing prices drop.....maybe

In a Fraccionamiento, the Board cannot change the Bylaws without a vote of the residents at an AGM or an SGM, legally. 

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1 hour ago, ibarra said:

In a Fraccionamiento, the Board cannot change the Bylaws without a vote of the residents at an AGM or an SGM, legally. 

Yes, “legally.” Have you heard the horror stories of fracs being turned into battle grounds and a life of dueling lawsuits for homeowners? I would never choose even the possibility of ending up in the midst of stuff like that. 

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We have lived in CH for the past 9 years.  We love it here.  The rules etc are put into place to assist residents against things like "an auto shop opening up next door, screaming loud music all night, etc.  We find it very peaceful, tranquil and lovely.  Many of us wouldn't live anywhere else Lakeside.  We don't get the "walking traffic", we are a eco community with tons of colorful birds.  We have a active security guard who travels the Fracc all day, every day and he is our extra eyes and ears.  We also have a large amount of security cameras located throughout our Fracc.  We are a large community, growing everyday - lots of new building going on here.  Being a 5 minute drive to Sorianna and Chapala and a 8 minute drive down the libra to Walmart and not to mention only a 25 minute ride to the Guadalajara airport, Chapala |Haciendas is fast becoming the "new central location!    Yes, the ground moves some, but it does all over Lakeside.  I hope this gives you some insight about our lovely community.

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2 hours ago, ibarra said:

In a Fraccionamiento, the Board cannot change the Bylaws without a vote of the residents at an AGM or an SGM, legally. 

ibarra, you should ask the homeowners in El Dorado about how bylaws need a vote of the residents to be changed 'legally'.  They'll tell you the horror story of their fight for the last 8 or 9 years!

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31 minutes ago, Mainecoons said:

One aspect to check into is how many owners are not paying fracc fees owed.  This is a real problem with fraccs and condos in Mexico as the laws and tools management have here to collect from the "morosos" are very weak.

Actually, if the by-laws were written correctly to begin with, it's a pretty straight forward process to proceed into court and have a judge order the sale of the property in arrears once all the other steps have been followed. Certified letters, etc.  

Now...if the offender has friends in high places...all bets may be off as most of us realize. Our condo assoc. in PV only needed to take the first few steps while advising the scofflaw what was coming down the pike to actually cause him to voluntarily sell and at closing we got our pesos.

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We read Rony's writing on Chapala Haciendas when we were looking for a house. How much has it changed since May 2015 when he wrote it?

"The fact that you are asking the question (about wanting to live at the Haciendas) is already answering it...... and it has been asked quite often (which must mean something, no?).

This is not going to help the sale of my chocolate, but ...... if I think of Chapala Haciendas I think of : lose Pittbulls that for the longest time have caused a lot of fear and harm there, I think of criminal activity (over the last 10 years, it is a looong list, but people tend to have a short memory) and easy escape routes (for potential criminals, almost immediately on a good escape route to Guadalajara), the police taking the longest time to get there (you will find posts about that here on the webboard), I think of a lot of bickering among the people who manage the Haciendas...... I have a lot of friends living there and personally, I would not even like to spend the night there.

If your car breaks down,....... public transport is a problem too. If a bus passes by (even the 2nd class one), the driver might not even want to stop.

Granted, lately, it seems that the criminal activity has been less of a problem, but it also appears that our region is entering another episode with a lot of turmoil.

And I do envy the people there for living so close to nature and in a more quiet environment....... but not at any price. Yes, crime happens anywhere, but ... "priorities" is the key word..

To summarize....

Prices are pretty low there (compared to other fraccionamientos) and not without a reason. Check with people, who don't have any personal interest in defending it (or are able to rise above it) and use common sense (referring to the points I mentioned above). This is the personal conclusion from someone, who doesn't have a dog in this fight and has been following up the Haciendas for the last 10 years (through friends living there and the local media). And check with Mexicans. Through my employment project, I have sent a lot of people there and crime is their concern, going there to work (and returning home after 6 pm). And believe me, Mexicans know..... (they might not tell their employer directly)

And to all the people living there, who will be angry with me now....... you can only really improve a situation, if you first admit the shortages and problems. You will be your own worst ennemy by ignoring it..... but, so be it. It is what it is and people will only believe what they want to believe.

Did I answer your question ?

Rony"

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I attracted a lot of heat in 2015 when  I thought Rony was suffering from a case of "suburbaphobia". Perhaps he is not used to the concept while growing up and working in Europe. Chapala Haciendas was the first development built specifically to attract foreigners. Gated communities were all the rage in the late 1970's, and quite frankly, with all the rules etc, they were designed to repel "undesirables", which was a short term for persons of color. Many of the houses built here at that time, and into the 1980's, were not built with security in mind. Today they must be updated with alarms, steel, fencing and lighting. That's the way of the world today, unfortunately. Over that past seven years there have been very few incidents and the only tip I will give is to stay away from lots close to the forest, where eyes may be watching, and take special care when there are construction crews in the area. There are Morosos, but they are mostly Mexican names, who bought vacant lots, hoping for a boom which never happened. Sound familiar?

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