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2019 Income / Asset Qualification numbers

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I updated the figures for 2019

 

http://www.chapalalaw.com/immigration-2/

VISA REQUIREMENTS AT MEXICAN CONSULATES OUTSIDE MEXICO:
To qualify for the temporary visa they must show a monthly income of 300 times the minimum wage (for 2019 it is 102.68 pesos) or 30,804 pesos or $1,572 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.59 to 1 (using January 2, 2019 exchange rate). This must be documented with 6 months bank statements. People who have liquid assets may qualify showing that they have maintained an average balance of 5,000 times the minimum wage (for 2019 it is 102.68 pesos) or 513,400 pesos or $26,207 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.59 to 1 (using January 2, 2019 exchange rate). This must be documented with 12 months bank statements.

To qualify for the permanent visa they must show a monthly income of 500 times the minimum wage (for 2019 it is 102.68 pesos) or $51,340 pesos or $2,620 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.59 to 1 (using January 2, 2019 exchange rate). This must be documented with 6 months bank statements. People who have liquid assets may qualify showing that they have maintained an average balance of 20,000 times the minimum wage (for 2019 it is 102.68 pesos) or 2,053,600 pesos or $104,829 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.59 to 1 (using January 2, 2019 exchange rate). This must be documented with 12 months bank statements. It has been reported to us that in the past there was no minimum age limit on people applying for permanent visas but now many have reported that consulates are asking to see pension or retirement income in order to apply for the permanent visa or they are not giving them to people who are under 50 or 60 years old if at all. Shop around as consulates have different internal guidelines and if you are in this situation it pays to make some calls.

You can apply for visas for your spouse (gay couples included) and children at the consulate at the same time or we can do it when you are here in Mexico once the primary applicant has their visa. Remember that in order to do this we will need birth / marriage certificates and apostilles (legalized copies for those from Canada or non Hague Convention countries).

Please be advised that the consulates might have their own special rules. Processing time varies from a few hours to a few days on average. We can consult with you prior to your trip to the consulate and then prepare you for finishing the process here in Mexico as well as advise you how to properly fill out the FMM form upon arrival so that there will be no processing delays. Clients have reported that the consulates in Laredo, Texas and Phoenix, Arizona are some of the easier ones to deal with some only requiring US$1,000 per month to get temporary when they went last year, we have not heard if they will be as generous this year. While the law says you must give 6 or 12 months bank statements, many consulates only ask for 3 to 6 months. Laredo and other consulates require an appointment be made online prior to going, we can help you make your appointment and go over documentation requirements so you do not have to make two trips.

We can make your appointment for your visa at the following consulates for a small fee:

United States
Laredo, Texas; Phoenix, Arizona; Denver, Colorado; Washington, DC; Boston, Massachusetts

Canada
Calgary

South America
Quito, Ecuador; Bogota, Colombia,

Europe
London, England; Paris, France; Madrid, Spain; Barcelona, Spain; Rome, Italy; Milan, Italy

Asia
Beijing, China; Hong Kong, China; Tokyo, Japan; New Delhi, India

VISA REQUIREMENTS AT THE NATIONAL IMMIGRATION INSTITUTE INSIDE MEXICO:
To qualify for the temporary visa they must show a monthly income of 400 times the minimum wage (for 2019 it is 102.68 pesos) or 41,072 pesos or $2,097 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.59 to 1 (using January 2, 2019 exchange rate). This must be documented with 6 months bank statements. People who have liquid assets may qualify showing that they have maintained an average balance of 25,000 times the minimum wage (for 2019 it is 102.68 pesos) or 1,767,200 pesos or $91,233 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.59 to 1 (using January 2, 2019 exchange rate). This must be documented with 12 months bank statements. This is most commonly applied to those who renew late and have to prove income again.

To qualify for the permanent visa they must show a monthly income of 500 times the minimum wage (for 2019 it is 102.68 pesos) or $51,340 pesos or $2,620 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.59 to 1 (using January 2, 2019 exchange rate). This must be documented with 6 months bank statements. People who have liquid assets may qualify showing that they have maintained an average balance of 25,000 times the minimum wage (for 2019 it is 102.68 pesos) or 2,567,000 pesos or $131,036 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.59 to 1 (using January 2, 2019 exchange rate). This must be documented with 12 months bank statements. Immigration has been applying a rule the past few years that in order to change from temporary to a permanent visa that you must show that you receive a pension or retirement income, even $1.00. This has effectively stopped many people from “jumping ahead” if they only have savings and do not receive any pension or retirement income, in these cases people must complete all 4 years as a temporary before going to permanent if for only financial reasons (not family related).

You can apply for visas for your spouse (gay couples included) and children at the consulate at the same time or we can do it when you are here in Mexico once the primary applicant has their visa. Remember that in order to do this we will need birth / marriage certificates and apostilles (legalized copies for those from Canada or non Hague Convention countries).

*2016 Note – Immigration has changed their position during the past year and now will deny renewals for temporary visas for people who entered Mexico with permission to work for a company and then change to be self employed. They are alleging that the same entry conditions do not exist. We feel this is a violation of the 5th Article of the Mexican Constitution as well as Human Rights so please plan accordingly if you are inside Mexico and wish to switch jobs.

People who find themselves within Mexico and due to health reasons cannot travel can get humanitarian visas if a doctor from a government clinic prepares a letter describing their situation and that they are unable to travel. Old age, forgetting to return, or having a junker car that will not make it to the border are not valid reasons.

Please be advised that the consulates might have their own special rules. People have reported that the Mexican Consulates in Laredo, Texas, Phoenix, Arizona and Las Vegas, Nevada are very lenient and have approved people for temporary visas with income as little as $1,000.00USD per month under 2017 income limits. Processing time varies from a few hours to a few days on average. We can consult with you prior to your trip to the consulate and then prepare you for finishing the process here in Mexico as well as advise you how to properly fill out the FMM form upon arrival so that there will be no processing delays.

The U.S. Consulate General in Guadalajara would like to inform the U.S. citizen community that American citizens who need to renew or add pages to their passports, do notarials or report a lost/stolen passport can meet with American Consulate staff to submit applications or to notarize documents during the staff’s monthly visit to the Lake Chapala Society and the American Legion Post 7. While the visits often fall on the first or second Wednesday of every month, not all do. The remaining date for consular visits for the 2018 year is Thursday, December 13, 2018 and proposed dates for 2019 are: January 9, February 13, March 13, April 10, May 8, June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11, October 9, November 13 and December 11.  We can also turn in your passport renewals to the US Consulate in Guadalajara if you are unable to go due to age or health reasons. They can be picked up afterwards during the consulate’s monthly visits or sent by Fedex.

The new times for consular services provided at the American Legion in Chapala will be from 9:30 am to 10:30 a.m., and at The Lake Chapala Society in Ajijic from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Payments for Consular Services offered in the Lake Chapala area are done by bank check from Banamex in Chapala, Avenida Madero #222, made out to “United States Disbursing Officer on behalf”, no other forms of payment are accepted. If you go to the United State Consulate in Guadalajara then you may pay by credit card or cash in pesos or US Dollars. You will need to fill out a form at Banamex to order the check, here is the form from 2018 Banamex US passport check form

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Moderator.... is it *sticky* time?

 

P.S.  THANKS Spencer!

 

 

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I have a temporal which I obtained through my spouse who has passed away.  I was told my Temporal will not be renewed. The lady stated that since I got temporal through family connection, I can't just convert to temporal even with the income on my own.

Actually, I don't want to renew it.  I want to convert to Permanente and I have the income.  Immigration here indicated that I may have to leave the country to apply and mentioned you MUST have a Pension.  Well, some of us don't have a pension, however, we do have investment income instead.  Can someone enlighten me.  I don't see on regulations where it says that.  If someone has the recent regulations, I'd appreciate a copy via PM.

 

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Per Sonia Diaz’s site, on immigration.....

For those who are Temporary Residents and living in Mexico, you may become a Permanent Resident at any time in less than 4 years. To do so, you must prove ~$2500 / month of only pension-sourced income; no other form of income, investments nor home ownership are considered. 

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Zeb, I am sorry for your loss. Please do yourself a favour and make an appointment with Spencer face to face to have your questions answered. For the record, we both became Inmigrado's (now called Permanente) based on investment income. Perhaps the rules have changed but, in this circumstance, you would be wise to seek Spencer's advice and not rely on a chat board. Suerte!

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I too qualified for a Permanente, not on retirement income, which is only US S.S. but on  the balance in a Bank/Brokerage account I had in Mexico.  It could have been a US account but by using my Mexican account I did not need to get the statements translated into Spanish.

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In 2017 we both got RP's.  One used pension income and the other used assets.  The assets were in a US bank and the consulate did not require translation of the US bank statements.   

@Zeb Sorry for your loss and dilemma.  I agree you should contact Spencer.  

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Different offices have different criteria, Guanajuato is different from Jalisco and Oaxaca

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Which office actually makes the decision on income qualifications?  Is it the Mexican Consulate in the States?  If the Consulate accepts the income, does that mean that Immigration here won't reverse the decision and they just finish the process?

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If you're applying in Mexico then the State in which you are applying sets the rules (see Spencer's post). If you're applying from the States then the Mexican Consulate in the city that you're applying sets the rules.

They are not all on the same page. Please go and see Spencer.

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26 minutes ago, Ferret said:

If you're applying in Mexico then the State in which you are applying sets the rules (see Spencer's post). If you're applying from the States then the Mexican Consulate in the city that you're applying sets the rules.

They are not all on the same page. Please go and see Spencer.

Okay. Thank you.

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Actually, if the consulate approves your visa application, you enter Mexico with that approval in your passport, report to INM and they process the approved visa application, and award the visa card. They will not know or care how you got approved. The two different agencies do not communicate much at all.

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51 minutes ago, RVGRINGO said:

Actually, if the consulate approves your visa application, you enter Mexico with that approval in your passport, report to INM and they process the approved visa application, and award the visa card. They will not know or care how you got approved. The two different agencies do not communicate much at all.

Well, then, that is good news.

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I have been unable to reach the Laredo Consulate although I have the extension and name of the person who can be of assistance.  If anyone has the specific requirements from Laredo, please let me know and send me a PM. 

I have read Spencer's list, however, it is not specific to what Laredo will accept and that is what I need.  I don't really want to make an appointment at this time just to get that.  I can do so once I have all my documents lined up for review.

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Zeb - I could tell you were hinting in that direction. I had only met Kirk a couple of times, but I can tell you he is now in a better place.

You will sort immigration out - they are pussycats and definetely want kind, considerate people such as yourself living in this country. Keep Calm. It will happen. They will not "fail you" over some minor detail.

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The Laredo consulate follows the requirements as per my web site. Almost weekly I have clients who go to the MX consulate in Laredo and all have positive comments. 

http://www.soniadiaz.mx/immigration---visas.html

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Wow , now with all the baby boomers having less monies and un able to qualify , I guess there will be more undocumented NOB refugees passi g the time of day in the Chapala Plaza

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