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Canterra sealer mineral based


Mainecoons
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I have canterra stone around my pool and would like to find a suitable mineral or silicone based sealer that will bring up the color some.  Not finding a lot of local help or information with this.  I went by the canterra place in front of Tobolandia and they had no information.

Anyone here done something similar or know someone who can point me in the right direction?

Thanks

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No.  I wonder how it would do next to a pool where it is getting splashed a lot.

There is something called Parks Mex Seal and Stone Glamour sold in the U.S. that is perfect for this but as usual not available here.  One seals and the other gives a Satin finish.  We tried an acrylic sealer, that was bad, turned white after wet a while.  Just wore off finally.

https://sparkssw.com/shop/

 

 

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I have this stuff on my Wish List for Amazon. You can read the customer questions and also take a look at the "customers also looked at these products" section. I have flagstone in my courtyard and love the look of it when it's wet... that's what I'm trying to achieve. Hugh Roberts of zipptransport.com will bring it down for you... if it's what you want.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D7H97ES/?coliid=I1S943ORJ8ZQ1M&colid=9UO437NK1P8L&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

http://zippmypackages.com/

 

 

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You should try potassium silicate, this is available from various sources in Mexico according to google. I don't know the quantities they deal with, the last time, in Canada, the PQ corporation sent me a five gallon tote at no charge. This is liquidized sand, and it soaks into the surface anywhere water would go, and then forms crystals of silica. It still allows the stone to breath a little, which is very important for preservation. It dries to flat finish, you can add alkali resistant pigments to it and it will not effect the performance. A German company, Keim, has made quite a success using this as a base for minerals. It is also used as a a corrosion inhibitor for metals, fireproofing (sprayed on palapas and bamboo like fire hazards). It is used in the movie industry to simulate a hoar frost, dipping dried twigs in the solution. It has no odor, and is completely environmentally benign. Another is goverment water supplies which want to minimise damage to metal pipes. An "off label" use, not approved by the FDA, is to spray fruit with it to give a nice shine. Interesting material. It is also the only "paint" I have seen that sticks reliably to glass surfaces.

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