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Halloween 2018


Trudeaue
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Halloween is only sporadically celebrated in Mexico.  Day of the Dead is celebrated here on Nov1 for children that died and Nov 2 for adults.  People visit cemeteries and invite their departed loved ones to join them.  It's not a scary thing but rather a loving coming together of loved ones.

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33 minutes ago, Trudeaue said:

Does anyone know of any halloween events for children this year? Thanks in advance! 

Hi Trudeaue

There is not anything structured that I know of for children although more and more Mexican children go around trick or treating. I have seen it increase each year. A lot of the children with their parents tend to go to gringo subdivisions (where of course it is more likely people will have candy to give). The problem of course is a gated community does not just throw open their gates on Halloween so places like Chula Vista and Upper La Floresta are two of the choices I have seen.

I love that in Mexico we are multicultural. We embrace day of the dead, and  they have begun to celebrate Halloween. Because  they are celebrated on different days there seems to be no conflict.

Day of the Dead is a beautiful tradition here in which families and friends remember those who have passed and keep their memories alive. Cooking their favorite dishes, playing their favorite songs and sharing stories. It is believed that as long as you are remembered you are not truly gone. The movie Coco does a beautiful job of explaining this. Cemeteries are a popular place for people to feel close to their loved ones and gringos who choose to visit the cemetery are often included in gatherings if they respectfully ask to learn about the family member they are remembering. This also happens in front of peoples homes where they create alters to the dead. Unlike other countries children are taught not to fear death and the beauty of death is celebrated by decorated skulls and face paint. Nov 1st is dedicated to children who have died and is bitter sweet and a little sadder. Nov 2nd if for adults who have died.

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Please if you have trick or treaters visit your home be as gracious as they are when we partake in their holidays. Many do not have the money or resources for expensive costumes or any costumes at all. That they are choosing to celebrate Halloween should be enough. IMO

 

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The only time I observed that lakeside was when one year they chose to perform Thriller on the plaza on the same day there was a day of the dead procession going to the church. As a gringo I was appalled at the insensitivity.  Mutual respect and not overlapping celebrations goes a long way in smoothing out cultural differences. I think they moved the Thriller to the malecon in other years. Halloween could certainly be perceived as a conflict where you embrace the terror of the dead and zombies as opposed to celebrating the memory of the departed. In comparison Halloween does come off as a little barbaric when you contrast it with Day of the Dead IMO. But I see many Gringo's going to Halloween celebrations dressed as Catrinas and I know a lot of Mexican children wanting to dress up as Freddie Krugar  or Chuckie. I certainly have respect for Mexicans not wanting their celebration tainted, but I have observed little problems in that area locally

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39 minutes ago, sputnik said:

One year we took our little mexican children friends to Mirasol.  They really had a blast and we saw many others.  Does anyone know if Mirasol still hands out candy as our little friends really want to go again?

If they don't, my friend in Villa Nova expects hundreds from as far away as Jocotepec.

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In lower Chula Vista, we run out of candy about 7pm, after 300 kids, parents and grandparents. They bring little ones in a stroller with makeup on, really cute. They sometimes start by 4pm. But the streets are wide and safe, and they come by the car or truck load. They are having so much fun. Millions of smiles and lots of thanks yous in Spanish and English.

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5 hours ago, ladner said:

In lower Chula Vista, we run out of candy about 7pm, after 300 kids, parents and grandparents. They bring little ones in a stroller with makeup on, really cute. They sometimes start by 4pm. But the streets are wide and safe, and they come by the car or truck load. They are having so much fun. Millions of smiles and lots of thanks yous in Spanish and English.

wow, im learning so much.  Thank you

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And don't forget the procession for the Lady of the Rosary in Ajijic. The Ajijic plaza is very animated and besides the native dancers, many children are in costume. We always go and I take bags full of candy to hand out. A few others do as well. There are vendors selling treats and music. Lots of fun. Join us (and bring treats to hand out).

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This issue comes up every October.  Mexicans don't "celebrate" Halloween, there are simply the cheap (probably Made In China) costumes and other cheap accessories available and Mexican moms do love to dote on their kids.  However, I know from speaking with many locals that many do NOT like or support Halloween and some even resent it.  Halloween emphasizes the grotesque, scary, and horrible notion of "zombies" coming out of their graves to do harm to people.  Day of the Dead is exactly the opposite with the emphasis on the love and respect for one's ancestors who might come back for a visit if you put out their favorite foods and drinks and music.

Don't kid yourself, when scads of kids are brought in from other places, the parents are just teaching their kids "hustle the gringo".  The last thing any Mexican kid needs is more sugar!  They aren't getting any from me.  I live in the village relatively immersed in the local culture and already have abundant opportunities to see all the adorable Mexican kids and babies usually carried around by their moms or other loving family members.

Thanks Liqupure above for mentioning the Virgin of the Rosary Fiesta in Ajijic every year on Oct. 31, which has absolutely NOTHING to do with Halloween.  It is the culmination of a month long devotion of the Virgin of the Rosary during the entire month of October.  This could be your choice for something to "do" on Halloween.  It is the best fiesta of the year with numerous danzantes, mariachis that play in the beautiful little chapel, and closed out with a banda for dancing and lit up castillos at the end.  You do not have to travel far and wide to experience real Mexican culture and traditions.  They are right here under your nose.  

Here are a couple of my older videos of the highlights of this beautiful fiesta with a procession that winds through the village around sunset and winds up at the San Andres church for an outdoor Mass followed by festivities in the plaza:  I LOVE the danzantes!!!

 

 

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I agree with much of your post ezpz. One of the best pieces of advice I received from a long time expat resident more that 14 years ago is to remember you are a guest in this country. No matter how many years you are here. You are a guest. Act like a guest. Be polite and respectful. You do not drive the car....you sit in the back seat.

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In our 13 years at lakeside; first on Ocampo in Ajijic, then on Lopez Cotilla in Chapala, we never had any children at our doors on the last day of October.  Halloween is NOT observed in Mexico and I suggest that it not be encouraged. Join in the dia de los muertos celebrations and enjoy the vast cultural difference. It is a truly beautiful celebration of remembrance.

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2 minutes ago, RVGRINGO said:

In our 13 years at lakeside; first on Ocampo in Ajijic, then on Lopez Cotilla in Chapala, we never had any children at our doors on the last day of October.  Halloween is NOT observed in Mexico and I suggest that it not be encouraged. Join in the dia de los muertos celebrations and enjoy the vast cultural difference. It is a truly beautiful celebration of remembrance.

To my mind the difference is to NOT bring Halloween to the public plaza or malecon and thereby forcing it onto people (like Thriller) as opposed to Mexican children coming to your frac and you graciously giving out treats. Active celebration vs passive celebration. IMO

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I remember now from these posts that it was the procession for the Lady of the Rosary in Ajijic (not a day of the dead procession) that one year was coming to the church on the plaza and was met with gringos dressed as Zombies doing Thriller. Some of the Gringos got right in their faces and all their cars blocked the procession and they were throwing candies at the little old ladies walking in a religious procession.  It was horrible

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