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Susy Wilson

Comments about other communities around Lake Chapala?

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My husband and I are considering the Lake Chapala area for our retirement, as so many are it seems, but we are more interested in smaller communities around the lake and wondered if anyone has any information to share on any of the villages on the southern or eastern areas of the lake? We live in a very rural area here in WA state and it would be a big adjustment to move into a town of any size.  My drive currently to get a gallon of milk is at least 30 miles each way and I am fine with that. Would be interested in anything anyone would be willing to share:-) 

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The issue for people who don't live on the north side of the lake is the lack of fellow gringos to mingle and socialize with. You might consider Chapala Haciendas.

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...Just a nibble for thought: I don't know how old you are now, but for most people, driving 30 miles for groceries becomes less appealing as time goes on.😉 In general, I suggest you come on down and look the area over, including the South shore area.  You'll know when it looks comfortable.

 

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Lakeside  on the north shore is a group of small communities,  i live in San Antonio Talayacapan just about 30 minute walk west to AJIJIC.

We are not out in the woods , but a nice size town .close to shopping.

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Please come down and see this area before considering any further. At least explore the area on Google Earth. Living 30 miles from anything is very different as you age in a country not your own — especially if you are not fluent in the language.

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The south side will become what the north side is, over time... but that will be a long, long time. Definitely much cheaper and very "rural", with access to almost nothing in terms of shopping or restaurants. One huge consideration for you might be Internet: almost non-existent.

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Thank you for your responses:) We are visiting the area for a few months starting in December so we will be checking it out for ourselves but I just thought I would check on other peoples experiences that are already in the area. The Lake Chapala area is on the top of my list for areas that we are considering but I do have quiet a few:-)

Internet I love but I lived without it for the majority of my life already so I think I could manage. My husband does not use a computer and barely uses a cell phone so no issue there. I have been studying Spanish for quite some time and I am no where near fluent but hope immersion will help. We will have our adult daughters and grandkids living with us at least eventually, so when there comes a time that we can't or don't want to drive we will have drivers:-) Even if I stay in the states I will not be living in any sort of a city unless that is the only possibility and I hope that day never comes. I am very social and make friends where ever I go so living in a rural situation is not something I consider a negative. My husband has never met a stranger so he would be good on Mars I think:-) 

Again...thanks for your responses!

Susy

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Do check out Chapala Haciendas. It will be on your left when you drive/taxi from the airport to Ajijic, after you go up the hill then back down. 

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10 minutes ago, tomgates said:

Do check out Chapala Haciendas. It will be on your left when you drive/taxi from the airport to Ajijic, after you go up the hill then back down. 

There are actually 3 Chapala Haciendas.  Two are on the left side of the highway headed towards Ajijic, while the other is on the right hand side.  It appears to me from driving by, the two on the left might be more quiet, as the other one is very close to the highway.

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If you come, check all the various mentioned here.  The south side of the lake is definitely more country like and you may love that.

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Don't know how you're. getting here. To explore you will need a car. Driving in Mexico takes some doing. If you are 70 they will not rent you a car. Hire car/driver can get expensive.

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One important aspect to many of us here is the availability of doctors and specialists... Because of the increasing size of the local aging population, many specialists come to the north side on a weekly basis... We have one new hospital scheduled to open early next year and another in the works... The downside of living on the south side is the distance to Guadalajara for medical treatment.... This is important as one ages...

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1 hour ago, Tony321 said:

Don't know how you're. getting here. To explore you will need a car. Driving in Mexico takes some doing. If you are 70 they will not rent you a car. Hire car/driver can get expensive.

Not true, I have a few friends who have rented with no problems, all over 70.

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I have a friend who just moved to the south side, she loves it already. She told me she gets better cell phone service over there, drives over here often for social engagements, etc. With Telcel now offering internet service, which has been reported to be better than Telmex or Telecable, that is no longer a problem over there either. From that area it is a straight shot up to Guadalajara and probably takes the same time or less than from the north side. It appears it is a viable a;alternative to this area, cheaper too. She tells me the view of the north side at night with all its' lights is outstanding.

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Land and house prices are much cheaper on the south side.  The communty's are mexican with a sprinkling of gringo's.  The areas are much more rural and the area starts at Jocotepec and winds around the south side of the lake with several small pueblos of around 1,000 to 2,000 people.  There are small stores which stock all your basic requirements. The North side is getting very commercialized and prices are sky rocketing.  Traffic on the north side is also beginning to be a problem.   

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South side of the lake  is cheaper now because  the gringo population is sparse (but on the rise). The more northerners will move there the more expansive it will become. It's just matter of time. Ajijic and area is getting crowded.

My vote is for Chapala Haciendas too. Nice area which feels like a country but close to Chapala. You do need a car to live there. It is only a short drive to town. I have a feeling that you will be happy wherever you're planted and that the whole area will appeal to you.

All the best.

 

 

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Here is a blog by a young Mexican photographer. Some very good comments here. It takes a rather special person to move to one of these pueblos, these were the types of expats who first moved to Ajijic a long time ago. Immersion Spanish and an academic grade tutor for two days a week will take you fluent within six months. Life is good in these places - can walk to everything, usuallly social, and very safe. Then a funny thing happens. You become at one with the community, the heartbeat, and no longer crave the attention of fellow gringos, in fact, maybe even avoid it. I have seen gringos actually cringe when a tourist thinks they have uncovered one - "HEY, Hey, you, where are you from? Canada! I'll be dammed, how did a Canadian find themselves down here! - etc, etc, drawing a polite crowd. Many, just pretend they don't speak English. Many Mexicans do the same. Gringos assume they are Spanish speakers (which of course they are) and practise their Spanglish on them, only to find, as they open up, that the person they assumed was uniligual, uneducated Spanish, was actually an academic for many years in Canada or the U.S.A.. Food for thought.

http://fulanitoviajero.com/11-municipios-impresionantes-de-jalisco-que-pocos-jaliscienses-conocen/

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I am pretty sure Islander is right.....I will be happy where ever I am:-)

We are driving to Mexico and will always have a vehicle. Hoping to get some land where we can have multiple dwellings so my daughters will be encouraged to come and live in Mexico too with my grandson. Don't have much need of medical care yet except for my 83 year old mother that will be moving with us but she does have a number of medical concerns so that will be an issue no doubt:/ 

We will be in the lakeside area for a few weeks and will be exploring everyplace that has been suggested and again thanks so much for all the feedback:-) I have been following this forum for a number of months and really appreciate all the great information!

Susy

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23 minutes ago, CHILLIN said:

Here is a blog by a young Mexican photographer. Some very good comments here. It takes a rather special person to move to one of these pueblos, these were the types of expats who first moved to Ajijic a long time ago. Immersion Spanish and an academic grade tutor for two days a week will take you fluent within six months. Life is good in these places - can walk to everything, usuallly social, and very safe. Then a funny thing happens. You become at one with the community, the heartbeat, and no longer crave the attention of fellow gringos, in fact, maybe even avoid it. I have seen gringos actually cringe when a tourist thinks they have uncovered one - "HEY, Hey, you, where are you from? Canada! I'll be dammed, how did a Canadian find themselves down here! - etc, etc, drawing a polite crowd. Many, just pretend they don't speak English. Many Mexicans do the same. Gringos assume they are Spanish speakers (which of course they are) and practise their Spanglish on them, only to find, as they open up, that the person they assumed was uniligual, uneducated Spanish, was actually an academic for many years in Canada or the U.S.A.. Food for thought.

http://fulanitoviajero.com/11-municipios-impresionantes-de-jalisco-que-pocos-jaliscienses-conocen/

Love this and exactly what I am looking for:-) Thanks so much!!!!

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If I as way 10 yrs younger and and moving to Mexico for the 1st time with plans of retire my choice would be Aguascalientes. Clean, less expnsive, good weather, and good heath care.  Plus good sidealks.

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4 hours ago, luvsdawgs said:

I have a friend who just moved to the south side, she loves it already. She told me she gets better cell phone service over there, drives over here often for social engagements, etc. With Telcel now offering internet service, which has been reported to be better than Telmex or Telecable, that is no longer a problem over there either.

I would love to hear from someone with personal experience using TelCel WiFi on the south side.

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CG, I think that would take a trip 'over there' and knock on a lot of doors....

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