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Mexican Citizenship test


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Unless they have changed rules on written exam there is no test if over 60.  They will challenge you on your verbal skills. They will NOT  speak to you in English. I was a pleasure dealing with the department SRE. It has been over three years since my citizenship. So not recent information. They do have a hand out with all the requirements. Pick that up first follow directions exactly.   Good luck.

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Yes, I picked up the paper work about 9 months ago, before the written test changed.  Now, there is no longer a written guide with test questions (100) of which they would ask 10.  My understanding is we had to answer 8 of 10 correctly.  From other postings on this topic, I've read some of the test questions currently being asked and they cover a far greater spectrum of knowledge.  It's intimidated me from taking the test (I'm under 60) and I, too, am eager to hear if someone has recently taken and passed the exam.  Also, if anyone knows, should I fail the exam, how long must I wait to re-take it?

As always, thanks for the info.

Valerie :)

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Unfortunately I'd probably do much better on a written test than an oral one as my hearing impairment makes it extremely difficult to hear the language at the normal speaking speed and volume.  Is there a written option for the hearing impaired?

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1 hour ago, Mainecoons said:

Unfortunately I'd probably do much better on a written test than an oral one as my hearing impairment makes it extremely difficult to hear the language at the normal speaking speed and volume.  Is there a written option for the hearing impaired?

When we went for what we thought was the final step in the citizenship process, both of us hearing-impaired seniors were confronted with a man (who the facilitator who accompanied us agreed had a serious speech impediment) who quizzed us in rapid fire Spanish.  We both failed.  Serious $$ investment up to that point wasted.  There was no written option.  This was several years ago, in Guadalajara. I have "heard" that there is a more lenient policy for seniors in Mexico city.

Good luck.🤔

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Yes, the procedure has changed. There is no history test for those of us over the age of 60. The web site says this: "personas mayores de sesenta años, será suficiente que acrediten saber hablar español."   It is my understanding that "knowing how to speak Spanish" means 1) speaking in Spanish at the interview  and 2) a two-part test, the first part consisting of a paragraph written in Spanish followed by 5-6 questions, some factual (i.e., you can find the answer in the paragraph) and some contextual (you have to understand the essence of the paragraph). In the second part, you are given a generic photo and are asked to write 2-3 sentences describing the photo. 

A friend recently took this test and told me that both the paragraph and the photo were "Day of the Dead" themes. But she thought there are 2-3 other "themes" so I am trying to find out what they are. 

So, does anyone have additional information on the themes?

Thanks.

 

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The speaking and the reading/writing are not the problem for we hearing impaired.  Serious hearing impairment usually includes cognitive impairment.  In my case I sometimes have problems understanding spoken English.  If the test requires me to understand spoken Spanish, I'd run into the same problem Gringal did.  In that case, no reason to even attempt it.

 

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1 hour ago, gringal said:

When we went for what we thought was the final step in the citizenship process, both of us hearing-impaired seniors were confronted with a man (who the facilitator who accompanied us agreed had a serious speech impediment) who quizzed us in rapid fire Spanish.  We both failed.  Serious $$ investment up to that point wasted.  There was no written option.  This was several years ago, in Guadalajara. I have "heard" that there is a more lenient policy for seniors in Mexico city.

Good luck.🤔

Ha! I got the same guy with the speech impediment. I just asked if he could speak a little louder that I had bad hearing. He slowed down and spoke louder. It turned out he was the most serious one in that department I dealt with.  

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Thanks for the additional information and personal experiences.  Still hoping to hear from someone who has had to take the written test.  The range of questions posted in an earlier posting on this topic were all across the board and seems difficult to study and prepare for the Exam.  And, also, does anyone know how long you must wait to re-take the Exam if you fail it?

Thanks,

Valerie :)

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1 hour ago, thevalerieleigh said:

Thanks for the additional information and personal experiences.  Still hoping to hear from someone who has had to take the written test.  The range of questions posted in an earlier posting on this topic were all across the board and seems difficult to study and prepare for the Exam.  And, also, does anyone know how long you must wait to re-take the Exam if you fail it?

Thanks,

Valerie :)

I passed the test last month, and it is my experiences noted above by the OP. Based on the sign that was posted on the wall, one can take the test 3 times in a calendar year. While I was there, two (under age 60) people who failed (the history test) merely got back on line to take the test again. I think the intent of INM was to give people a chance to study if they didn't succeed, but to each his/her own... 

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The man with the "cleft" palate is the current director. He is a serious block to understanding Spanish....yet his english is clear. You are ABLE to request a different person for the test. His assistant, a lady with crystal clear pronunciation gave us the Spanish test after we failed the first time at his desk. Senior Heraldo did stand behind her as she asked us questions but was  polite when she declared that we were able to speak and understand her. Note...that he is retiring at the end of this year and she will replace him. 

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I was told by the atty that the test portion (over 60) is to read a couple of paragraphs in a magazine article, something like the Mexico Desconocido magazine.  Then you go into a second room and answer 5 or 10 (?) multiple choice questions related to the magazine article.  The mistake some applicants make is that when they take you to room two for the multiple choice test, the applicant leaves the magazine article behind in room one.  You may take the magazine with you so that you can refer back to the article.

I recently obtained hearing aids and I feel that the aids have helped a lot with my comprehension of Spanish.  I feel much more confident in conversation.  Now that I can hear my own voice I speak at a normal volume level.  In my opinion that is important because those who speak loudly in this culture tend to be viewed as aggressive or impolite.  Better to blend in, than to stand out in my opinion.  

If I flunk the first time, I will call my uncle El Mencho to go with me on the second try.

 

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Yes, I took the Spanish test for Citizenship last month in Guadalajara. The young man that reviewed my paperwork and checked that I had everything in order gave me the test. When we went into the room for the test his whole attitude changed.

There were  two parts to the test. First was reading and comprehension  And the second was Look at a picture and write five sentences about the picture.

I was given a piece of paper with a two paragraph story on it {Probably 500 words} and was told I had 5 minutes to read it and answer 5 questions and the time starts now. So I began reading it, about a minute in he says No, read it aloud to me. So I start reading it to him. the story is about a magical kingdom of Mayans and everyone's name were like K'ak' Tiliw Chan Yopaat. He would stop me and say you pronounced that wrong read it again. He did that over and over so by the time I finished it I had 45 seconds left to answer the five questions.

Each answer was long and had 4 options to choose from I managed to get three out of 5 right so we moved to the other test.

I was handed a picture with a man and woman in a lab looking in Microscopes and told to write 5 sentences about the things I noticed and that I had 3 minutes.

I wrote the 5 things and when he started he grading it he said: First is wrong you didn't put a period at the end of your answer.

Two and three are wrong because you misspelled a word in each and 4 also you didn't capitalize so you have failed this test

He then gave me a big FU smile and left the room. When  I went back outside he said to feel free to come back to take the test again if I so choose.

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2 hours ago, texican said:

Yes, I took the Spanish test for Citizenship last month in Guadalajara. The young man that reviewed my paperwork and checked that I had everything in order gave me the test. When we went into the room for the test his whole attitude changed.

There were  two parts to the test. First was reading and comprehension  And the second was Look at a picture and write five sentences about the picture.

I was given a piece of paper with a two paragraph story on it {Probably 500 words} and was told I had 5 minutes to read it and answer 5 questions and the time starts now. So I began reading it, about a minute in he says No, read it aloud to me. So I start reading it to him. the story is about a magical kingdom of Mayans and everyone's name were like K'ak' Tiliw Chan Yopaat. He would stop me and say you pronounced that wrong read it again. He did that over and over so by the time I finished it I had 45 seconds left to answer the five questions.

Each answer was long and had 4 options to choose from I managed to get three out of 5 right so we moved to the other test.

I was handed a picture with a man and woman in a lab looking in Microscopes and told to write 5 sentences about the things I noticed and that I had 3 minutes.

I wrote the 5 things and when he started he grading it he said: First is wrong you didn't put a period at the end of your answer.

Two and three are wrong because you misspelled a word in each and 4 also you didn't capitalize so you have failed this test

He then gave me a big FU smile and left the room. When  I went back outside he said to feel free to come back to take the test again if I so choose.

Wow! attitudes have changed since I got my citizenship. I was treated kindly and had smiling faces. Sorry texican.  

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THis young guy if it is the same( I think he name is Gerardo , bit I am not 100%sure)  has a chip on his shoulder and is very annoyed foreigners get the citizenship too easily in his opinion.. His attitude has not changed. The other people are very nice.

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  • 1 month later...

My experience was heart warming. My first impression was that all of the employees were somewhat stoic. I tend to be gregarious and talk with everybody, even in lines in markets. I failed the reading comprehension part the first time; but felt that they really wanted me to pass. When I returned 2-1/2 weeks later to test again. Everybody in the department greeted me kindly. Both times Gerardo, the supervisor administered the test with Felipe at his side. This time I passed. As Gerardo was grading my test, Felipe held my hand. Before I left, I was hugged by every member of the department. When I walked out the door there was a crowd of about 100 people at the foot of the stairs leading to the door. I put my hands in the air with my fingers in a peace sign and stated "Soy Mexicana, Viva Mexico". The crowd erupted in applause,

My advice is to find a great lawyer who they know, and show them that you really want this. Show them that you are a person that they will be proud to call paisano.

My out of pocket cost was under $19000 pesos. My legal team made 4 trips to lakeside and one trip to CDMX on my behalf, guiding me at every step of the way and driving me to the interview both times. I count them as dear friends now.

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I am so happy to read of those who have persevered and got their citizenship. I believe that they do try to make you jump through as many hoops as possible. But, in the end they look kindly on those who show their love of mexico.

 

Please get registered to vote!!!! They respect those who vote. 

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