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TooMuchCoffee

Caladium Bulbs

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You might check the garden lady just east of 7-11 in Riberas, lake side.  She has seed packets, but don't know if she would have the bulbs.

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I've never been successful in sourcing bulbs here in Mexico-they seem to not sell them anywhere, altho maybe someone has had a different experience. However, there are many different caladiums available as plants in nurseries and the bulbs multiply quickly.

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Most viveros sell caladiums. Try the vivero behind Super Lake, the large vivero at the carretera and the libermento, Jesus in San Juan Cosala on the South side of the highway. There are viveros in Jocotepec that sell them but that might be too far, Laura at the Garden Center in Riberas does not sell bulbs and growing caladiums from seed can take years.

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Jesus in San Juan Cosala would be my choice. Amazing selection of very healthy plants. It may look like a little skinny place by it's entrance but it goes back a looooong way. Going west, aim for the cell tower on the south side of the highway and it is just before that.

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I bought Caladium plants 15 years ago and keep them in pots, when they

die back I put then in my greenhouse, I split them when to big in pots, stop by  my gallery and see about 15 different varieties in full glory now

 

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Caladium bulbs are not usually available here but the plants can be found in many nurseries.  Having said that the season is well underway so they may not be so available.   I would check the nursery down by Telecable, the nursery down from Superlake,  the nursery in San Juan Cosala, and the nursery in Jocotepec ( on the left of the curve as you enter the town).  It is best if you walk around and look closely at all the plants.   If they do not have them now I seriously doubt they will be getting them in.  When looking for plants here you have to make frequent visits to the same nursery.  Do not look once and quit.  Fortunately for me I love visiting nurseries even if I do not buy.

The other thing is once you get them in your garden the multiply like crazy so perhaps some people will share theirs with you. 

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16 hours ago, artsnob said:

I bought Caladium plants 15 years ago and keep them in pots, when they

die back I put then in my greenhouse, I split them when to big in pots, stop by  my gallery and see about 15 different varieties in full glory now

 

What do you mean, die back? My caladiums go all year long in Mexico. The only thing that seems to negatively affect them is not getting consistent watering.

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You must have a different kind than me,mine die back I fertilize them they make babies and rest, about six months later they come back bigger and better...

 

 

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I agree with artsnob.   The caladiums I have in my garden also die back every year as they did in the USA.  

That is unfortunate because over the winter the gardener digs up a lot of the bulbs.  Luckily there are always plenty of baby bulblets to make new plants.  I do not believe there are two types of caladiums:  one that dies back and one that does not.

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13 hours ago, artsnob said:

Where do buy your different caladiums, I would like to buy some like yours 

Here are the ones I'm talking about- I never bought them- they just seem to grow everywhere around here. I probably had some I dug up somewhere when I moved to my property ten years ago, it's hard to remember that far back. In the summer rainy season when they're getting lots of water, some of the leaves get about a foot across. I'd happily give you some, but I live in Sayulita. Perhaps it gets too cold Lakeside in the winter for Caladiums to keep their leaves? Altho we can get some pretty cold winter nights here as well.

caladiums.jpg

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That is poison dart frog caladium. I haven't found that type Lakeside. Beautiful.

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Years ago when I had house in Sayulita, I dug some up for my garden in Ajijic,  they survived two season and perished in our cold winters and never came back. I recently bought one at SJC vivero I will put in greenhouse in October 

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7 hours ago, Joco said:

That is poison dart frog caladium. I haven't found that type Lakeside. Beautiful.

Thanks, Joco, I didn't know the name (and what an odd name it is). My neighbor calls them "Freckles". One of my house guests asked me in all seriousness if I painted the white and red spots on.

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Caladium Plant Care The most important factors in caladium care are moisture and feeding. Fertilizer will help strengthen the plants in order to produce adequate tubers for the following growing season. Caladiums need to be watered on a regular basis, especially during dry conditions. In fact, watering them on a weekly basis is recommended. Caladiums that are grown in containers should be checked daily and watered as needed. Applying mulch around caladium plants will help to conserve and maintain moisture, even in containers. Since caladiums are considered tender perennials, they must be dug up in the fall and stored indoors over winter in cold climates. Once their foliage yellows and begins falling over, caladiums can be carefully lifted from the ground. Place the plants in a warm, dry location for at least a couple weeks to dry out. Then cut off the foliage, place the tubers in a netted bag or box, and cover in dry peat moss. Store the tubers in a cool, dry location. Once spring returns, you can replant outdoors. If you are growing caladiums in containers, they can be overwintered indoors.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Caladium Plant Care: How To Plant Caladiums https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/bulbs/caladium/caladium-plant-care.htm

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While the leaves may die back because of the cold winters, does it really get so cold Lakeside that the bulbs would freeze? I kind of doubt it. I should think you could leave them in the ground, maybe covered with some mulch, and they'd just leaf out as soon as the weather warmed up. Of course, if the plan is to divide the corms so you can plant in other areas, that's different.

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28 minutes ago, NomScott said:

Where is Jesus's place located in SJC?

On the carretera, 1 1/2 blocks east of the stop light, between Juarez and Independencia, next to a party store.  I bought caladium plants there last Saturday.

https://www.google.com.mx/maps/@20.2877501,-103.338789,3a,37.5y,194.98h,79.16t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1s-dPodbWWuKW9nPkMsGlQ8Q!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo0.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3D-dPodbWWuKW9nPkMsGlQ8Q%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D170.26942%26pitch%3D0%26thumbfov%3D100!7i13312!8i6656

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On 7/28/2018 at 8:06 AM, Floradude said:

Caladium Plant Care The most important factors in caladium care are moisture and feeding. Fertilizer will help strengthen the plants in order to produce adequate tubers for the following growing season. Caladiums need to be watered on a regular basis, especially during dry conditions. In fact, watering them on a weekly basis is recommended. Caladiums that are grown in containers should be checked daily and watered as needed. Applying mulch around caladium plants will help to conserve and maintain moisture, even in containers. Since caladiums are considered tender perennials, they must be dug up in the fall and stored indoors over winter in cold climates. Once their foliage yellows and begins falling over, caladiums can be carefully lifted from the ground. Place the plants in a warm, dry location for at least a couple weeks to dry out. Then cut off the foliage, place the tubers in a netted bag or box, and cover in dry peat moss. Store the tubers in a cool, dry location. Once spring returns, you can replant outdoors. If you are growing caladiums in containers, they can be overwintered indoors.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Caladium Plant Care: How To Plant Caladiums https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/bulbs/caladium/caladium-plant-care.htm

All this sounds spot on, except for the fertilizing part. I guess if they're in containers maybe you need to do that, but mine are in the ground here in Sayulita, I've certainly never fertiziled them, and some of the leaves get up to a foot across in the summer rainy season.

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