Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard
Mischiefmaker

Budgeting costs of reconnaissance

Recommended Posts

Universal healthcare is now well in motion in Mexico, with over 65 million subscribers receiving no cost, low cost, healthcare and prescriptions - all in about 6 years time. Mostly funded by the Federal I.V.A. tax. This trend is likely to continue with the new Presidente. The Public General Hospital that I like to go to in Guadalajara has 245 beds and 45 specialties. It has just built a whole new, 4 story hospital on their property, with 350 plus beds, then they will renovate the old hospital. Seguro Popular might restrict its use to Permanent Residents or Citizens only. It does not do so at this time, although tourists can be covered for emergency treatment.

  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, CHILLIN said:

Universal healthcare is now well in motion in Mexico, with over 65 million subscribers receiving no cost, low cost, healthcare and prescriptions - all in about 6 years time. Mostly funded by the Federal I.V.A. tax. This trend is likely to continue with the new Presidente. The Public General Hospital that I like to go to in Guadalajara has 245 beds and 45 specialties. It has just built a whole new, 4 story hospital on their property, with 350 plus beds, then they will renovate the old hospital. Seguro Popular might restrict its use to Permanent Residents or Citizens only. It does not do so at this time, although tourists can be covered for emergency treatment.

Do you have a link for this healthcare?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Tiny said:

Do you have a link for this healthcare?

Google will give you lots of words - in English and Spanish. What it doesn't say is there is definitely a learning curve to deal with their unique (to me) procedures and paperwork. They are not there to put people in misery, they are there to focus on medical treatment - not handholding and customer service. Best to speak Spanish, or bring someone with you, in the early stages of a procedure or treatment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, hensley said:

What about Medical, how do you think you could afford that here if you have no savings, insurance or whatever?

What about Medicaid for low income folks in the USA?? ..maybe better than IMSS or SP in Mexico??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, hensley said:

What about Medical, how do you think you could afford that here if you have no savings, insurance or whatever?

As I stated in my op, I literally just heard about this area/this idea 3 weeks ago now.  Obviously medical is a huge question mark, and that's what I need to research most of all.  I may have misrepresented our situation somewhat...  we both work FT and have medical insurance through our jobs; currently we pay very little out of pocket because my Yale insurance is excellent.  We're willing to leave that behind (not to mention a Yale pension) to move someplace warmer for our health and sanity.  We both have retirement savings plans, but our day-to-day savings is often depleted by car repairs or a trip, and then we start all over again.  If we move to Tucson, at least one of us will get a job beforehand, and then we will have medical insurance for us both. If we move to MX, it would only be if my wife was granted permission to perform her job remotely, and we'd switch to her co's insurance and look into how her medical insurance would serve us there.  I don't think we could swing it otherwise?  Dunno yet.  That's why I'm here!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Her medical insurance", if like most, will not serve either of you if you reside in Mexico. You would need an 'International Policy' of some sort.  Medicare is also useless outside of the USA.

"Medical Coverage" in Mexico is not at all like you may be familiar with in the USA. In most cases, you will pay out of pocket for rouitine care and medications. If you are young enough, and healthy enough to get private Mexican medical insurance, it will have deductibles, as you choose, and be primarily for major hospitalizations. The national health plans are truly public health programs with long wait times, variable availability of services, Spanish language based and definitely requiring a 'responsible person', usually a family member, to stay in hospital with you; without any comforts. Think: Sleeping on the floor. They are triage systems, where the elderly may be allowed to 'slip away'.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"They are triage systems, where the elderly may be allowed to 'slip away'." (R.V. Gringo)

That statement would scare any senior signed up with SP.  Is it based on hearsay or facts?  If facts, please share them.
 

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, RVGRINGO said:

"Her medical insurance", if like most, will not serve either of you if you reside in Mexico. You would need an 'International Policy' of some sort.  Medicare is also useless outside of the USA.

"Medical Coverage" in Mexico is not at all like you may be familiar with in the USA. In most cases, you will pay out of pocket for rouitine care and medications. If you are young enough, and healthy enough to get private Mexican medical insurance, it will have deductibles, as you choose, and be primarily for major hospitalizations. The national health plans are truly public health programs with long wait times, variable availability of services, Spanish language based and definitely requiring a 'responsible person', usually a family member, to stay in hospital with you; without any comforts. Think: Sleeping on the floor. They are triage systems, where the elderly may be allowed to 'slip away'.

Sorry RV, I have enough respect for you not to say you are wrong, is that you are out of touch possibly kinder? This system did not really exist when you permanently left Mexico. The situation you describe is untrue, based on my first hand actual experience. The Social Workers are quite flexible on the family member requirement. The only people sleeping on floors are in the emergency room, where families are waiting to hear outcomes. They are only allowed to visit emergency for 10 minutes twice a day. The elderly may "slip away" as you put it, in very respectful palliative care wards. Often though families want their elders in the general wards, because they can see them most any time, and there is always hope for a miracle. The Hospital wants to respect those wishes - even though it means extra work for staff and disruption in the wards. The last time I was in hospital, I saw 4 people die of advanced old age.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can hang in there and get that pension, your life here will be the better for it. I know how hard it is to stay when you really want to go, but sometimes planning, prepping and researching can soothe the soul as it waits. 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over 80 seems to be the unspoken 'end of the road' status for many things in Mexico; like insurance, licenses, medical intervention, etc.  There is lots of love and respect, but the Mexican attitude toward natural death among those of advanced age is more acceptance, rather than intervention. 

My only experiences; too many of them, were in private hospitals in Guadalajara, but I have assisted others in the public system by providing food, sleeping pads, pillows, blankets, etc., to make the floor more comfortable.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, RVGRINGO said:

Over 80 seems to be the unspoken 'end of the road' status for many things in Mexico; like insurance, licenses, medical intervention, etc.  There is lots of love and respect, but the Mexican attitude toward natural death among those of advanced age is more acceptance, rather than intervention. 

My only experiences; too many of them, were in private hospitals in Guadalajara, but I have assisted others in the public system by providing food, sleeping pads, pillows, blankets, etc., to make the floor more comfortable.

So......no facts.  I think you've been gone too long.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, RVGRINGO said:

Over 80 seems to be the unspoken 'end of the road' status for many things in Mexico; like insurance, licenses, medical intervention, etc.  There is lots of love and respect, but the Mexican attitude toward natural death among those of advanced age is more acceptance, rather than intervention. 

My only experiences; too many of them, were in private hospitals in Guadalajara, but I have assisted others in the public system by providing food, sleeping pads, pillows, blankets, etc., to make the floor more comfortable.

At the Public General Hospital in Guadalajara (one of many) you are not allowed to bring in food, sleeping pads, pillows or blankets. Bottles of water are always welcome because the busy wards do not have time to fill carafes. When you enter the hospital, all your clothing and shoes are placed in a sealed plastic bag. I guess they are (rightfully) concerned about cross contamination, bedbugs and fleas. Sleeping on the floor also creates an obstacle if you require critical care. I found a work around, I bring my mesh diving bag, and stuff it with sweaters, etc., to make a pillow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha ha - should of made it clear that it is only incoming patients to the wards that have to give up their clothes NOT visitors. Otherwise that would be - interesting!

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found your reply very helpful, even through it was not my question.  Thanks for your time here.

One difference in opinion, and of course these things are all individual, is the need for a car rental.  I rented a wonderful house for three months earlier this year, in Villa Nova, an easy 1/2 block to a bus stop, thinking the very excellent bus system would be adequate for me.  But I found that furnishing a house, with all furniture and housewares supplied but previously unrented, took many trips to bring in supplies.  Taxis because expensive and it became to difficult to deal with packages while waiting or sitting in the bus.  Also, I found I liked the freedom to visit the markets or pick up a friend from the airport.  I love to drive and privately rented an old Jalisco licensed but fully insured junker and it all went seamlessly.  Yes, you have to be a good driver but after a bit the system becomes intuitive and I really enjoyed driving there, especially not spending $40 US+ to pick up friends from the airport.  The person I rented from was Mexican but understood my English and when the car had a problem, he arranged for it to be repaired and returning without any inconvenience to me.  He was ethical and a very nice man and the entire experience was a good one.  I had a 2010 car for $600/month and now know of a 2006 car for $450/month.  I haven't finalized arrangements for this coming visit for the months of August and September but hope to have another great experience.   Thanks for listening and for your helpful post!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have been here for almost 14 years and I have been visiting Mexico - and many other countries - for more than 50 years. I'll chime in with some comments - purely my experiences and observations.

We came here 6 or 8 times before seriously considering moving here. We intentionally stayed in different places each time to get a feel for different neighborhoods. Mostly in Ajijic and nearby. We rented a car on each of those trips so we could do lots of exploring. But we also used buses and taxis to understand what worked for us.

I was still working  at the time but my wife had an opportunity to house sit for a couple of months and I came down several times during that period. That gave us - mostly her - a chance to "live" here as opposed to "visiting" here. After that experience we were pretty certain this is where we wanted to "retire".

We came back and rented a house for a year - and I was still working and coming and going pretty regularly. In most cases I would come down and work from here for a week at a time and then travel for work in the U.S. for 3 weeks or so.

After renting for a year we bought a house - and I continued to work for a little bit more than another year. After that I "retired" as I said and moved to Ajijic full time. A couple of clients asked me to work on a few projects and after about 6 months I accidentally had a business. After all this time I still do. I do almost everything over the internet and have a U.S. phone number (Vonage). I have three employees in the U.S. including my 36 year old daughter who has been able to work from home while raising my two grandsons - now 8 & 10.

All of my clients are in the U.S., all payments are made in the U.S. and all my clients know that I am in Mexico the vast majority of the time. I go to the U.S. a couple of times a year to see family - especially the grand-kids - and see a few clients while I am there. Works perfectly and has for well over 10 years.

Health insurance was important to us and we signed up for the best insurance we could find that would cover us here in Mexico. It is reasonable compared to full, major medical in the U.S. but is not cheap. It goes up every year but the exchange rate has helped us out and the cost in U.S. dollars has been fairly flat. We were both very healthy when we got here. But my wife had knee surgery and then a total knee replacement a few months ago. I have been okay for about two years now but for the 4 years before that I had one serious medical issues - several surgeries for cancer including colon cancer, four rounds of chemo, one round of radiation, a pacemaker, and triple bypass surgery. LOTS of experience with the private Mexican medical resources. Around $2,000,000 pesos in cost covered very effectively by our insurance. The facilities and care we received have been nothing short of extraordinary.

We have friends who have used SP & IMSS with very mixed results. Some had absolutely outstanding experiences and some had truly horrible outcomes. Seems like a very hit and miss situation but when it works it is great and very cost effective. 

The immigration laws have changed a bit since we moved here and as someone said may change again once the new president takes office. But the general framework is sort of the same. You can come down on a Tourist Visa that is good for 180 days. Nothing to do in advance - very simple. But it cannot be extended or renewed within Mexico. You have to leave the country and then get a new Tourist Visa. Some people have done that for years but that option could always change.

The next level is a "Temporary" Visa. It is good for a year and can be renewed within Mexico. You can come and go during that year without having to reapply. You have to apply at a Mexican Consulate or Embassy outside of Mexico. And as others have said you have to prove regular income - something around $1,500 - $2,000 per month - PER PERSON. We did that for several years but it was a while back so I may not have the numbers exactly right but that is in the ballpark. And my understanding is that income has to be from a pension, Social Security, etc. Income from a job or business does not count as that income could change or go away completely. Mexico wants to be sure you have ongoing income/resources regardless of how good a job you might currently have.

Contact your closest Mexican Consulate/Embassy. I have heard that each one may handle things slightly differently so call them and ask. They are very helpful and you can talk to them by phone or make an appointment to talk with them in person.

The next level is a "Permanent" Visa that never expires and you don't have to renew it. Some additional requirements but you are a bit away from that point - and it can always change.

Come on down and look around. We love it here and have never regretted our decision to move here. Personally my only regret is that I didn't do it sooner. It is definitely not for everyone and we have known some people that left after a few years. Works for us.

I'll be happy to answer any questions but hopefully some of this helps.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, REC said:

I'll be happy to answer any questions but hopefully some of this helps.

Did you do all that when you were living paycheck to paycheck?

  • Like 1
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can probably get a decent place to rent for $50 / day or less... Location is usually the determining factor... Plan on $50 / day for meals and misc. Car rentals depend on the vendor having the proper insurance. Many do not and consider you as a "friend" and that you are "borrowing" the car... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that the comment was tongue in cheek as the Post did not seem to be relevant to your (OP) situation. Interesting story 'tho....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My comments were intended to provide as much factual information as possible and hopefully I did so. I intentionally didn't tell the OP they were wrong or that their plan wouldn't work. I was just trying to relate my specific experiences and what I have found to be the challenges and costs involved - as well as the advantages and opportunities of moving here. My thought was that this would help the OP understand the requirements for staying here other than through a series of 180 visitor's visa. I also intended to support the idea is that it is quite possible to work remotely from here. I seemed to have missed the target. My apologies.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think you missed your target REC. I think you were spot on and gave a very detailed post which should have been more appreciated.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with ferret, you provided a most informative and interesting post. Anyone who can't glean several nuggets from it that applies to them must be a very different type of person. And you most certainly didn't tell them what to do.  Thanks for a great post.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first thought when I saw this post was if you have to budget for a trip you should forget it.

  • Like 8
  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/23/2018 at 11:40 AM, REC said:

I seemed to have missed the target. My apologies.

Not at all!!!  I don't know what anyone else's replies meant, but I know I, as the OP, really appreciated all the info you provided and the time it took you to post it.  It was all VERY relevant and most informative and doesn't insult my intelligence.

What I have NOT found helpful are the judgmental naysayers who look down on people who are just looking for a better way of life. I am going to go out on a limb and get personal here. Yes, we're "paycheck to paycheck" with small savings usually earmarked for a trip. I'm middle class. I make $60K per year, have three children (two have just launched), and am on my third spouse. Getting divorced and remarried twice costs $, let me tell you. Each time I've remarried it was the other person's first marriage so they wanted a wedding, and even with DIY for a lot, they add up. Over the years, I've bought three houses (two with spouses and one by myself, foreclosed), now I rent. My wife got laid off from AAA (after 18 years) a couple years ago and finally found a dream job that only pays $31K. So together our salaries are currently $80K. That should be plenty, right?  We shouldn't have to "budget" for a trip to Mexico, right?  People on here telling me if I have to budget for a trip, just forget about living there, I couldn't afford it. Acting all snobby when the only reason THEY are so well off is BECAUSE they're living there as opposed to where I live! Our combined salaries would go really far in a lot of other places. Try living in CT! We pay annual property tax on our CARS, people. It's insane.  So yeah, I want to get the hell out of this state and possibly this country, because I'm hoping I can get by more cheaply and get to work less (unfortunately I would not be keeping my 60K salary; I'm giving that up to leave the state). 

Ironic, isn't it?  Folks are clamoring to get into the US for a better life, but me, in the US middle class, am looking into reverse migration for the same thing.  Ultimately though I'm not sure it will work for us right now because I wouldn't be able to provide proof of my income for myself.  Kind of a catch-22.  Maybe we'll move to Tucson for a few years first, and if I can switch to freelance there, so I can prove steady income that way in MX, then maybe we can do it. Or maybe we'll do it after I start collecting my SS. I'm 55 now, so it's not that far off.

I want to thank the helpful posters and sharers who took time to actually READ my post and answer my queries thoughtfully, and for the rest of you, :p.  (I had to giggle at the person who replied to my queries about coming down for a visit, Why don't you come down for a visit first?  smh)

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/12/2018 at 2:52 PM, JayBearII said:

A note to the original posters: you will want to contact whoever you work for and make sure that they, or their clients, have no objections to your handling their information outside the U.S.

 I may have ruled this plan out for now, but to speak to this issue: Thanks for thinking of that, that was helpful. I work for a press and asked one of our indexers, who lives in Israel, if she ever had a problem with that and she said nope, absolutely not.  Nobody has ever turned her down because of where she lives. But great question! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...