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Recommendations for Fish stores

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Would like to get some recommendations on where to purchase wild caught fish, primarily wild caught salmon. We don't want to purchase farm raised. We purchased some salmon at a place here that called it wild but it was too inexpensive and did not taste wild. We are looking for a trusted source that is truly wild caught and is available on a consistent basis. Thanks!

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You are in the wrong place, I'm afraid. You must ask at either of the two well-known fish stores here, and you won't always get the most honest answer. There are several other fish mongers, a couple in Chapala, but they do not bring in specialized fish. They bring in local and nearby catch, none of which includes salmon. You would have to go to the fish markets in Guadalajara, and/or the abastos market, and again rely on the honesty of the seller.

This area is not sophisticated about most fish. A typical giveaway is when you ask at a restaurant what the fish is, and you are told "bass". Whatever that is, and it is usually "bassa" or bagre, which is catfish.

I have purchased wild frozen salmon in WalMart for half the price of the redder, larger filets, and it definitely tasted wild to me. And not nearly as good as the commercial stuff. Having lived on both coasts of Canada, I can testifiy as to my tastebuds for certain things. But what I was sold as wild, so labelled on the package? Who knows. There is little to no information on the package, and certainly not from the fish stores.

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Better to eat local Mexican catches, such as the many varieties of snapper which you will find far tastier than any snapper you had NOB.  Same with other local fish.  Live local, eat local. 

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21 hours ago, ComputerGuy said:

You are in the wrong place, I'm afraid. You must ask at either of the two well-known fish stores here, and you won't always get the most honest answer. There are several other fish mongers, a couple in Chapala, but they do not bring in specialized fish. They bring in local and nearby catch, none of which includes salmon. You would have to go to the fish markets in Guadalajara, and/or the abastos market, and again rely on the honesty of the seller.

This area is not sophisticated about most fish. A typical giveaway is when you ask at a restaurant what the fish is, and you are told "bass". Whatever that is, and it is usually "bassa" or bagre, which is catfish.

I have purchased wild frozen salmon in WalMart for half the price of the redder, larger filets, and it definitely tasted wild to me. And not nearly as good as the commercial stuff. Having lived on both coasts of Canada, I can testifiy as to my tastebuds for certain things. But what I was sold as wild, so labelled on the package? Who knows. There is little to no information on the package, and certainly not from the fish stores.

That's what I suspected...I saw the wild frozen salmon in my hands in WalMart last week but could not believe that it was really wild. So thanks for the tip, I trust your tastebuds and will try it.  

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21 hours ago, Bisbee Gal said:

Better to eat local Mexican catches, such as the many varieties of snapper which you will find far tastier than any snapper you had NOB.  Same with other local fish.  Live local, eat local. 

Agree about eating the local snapper, it's the nutrients in salmon that we're looking for. 

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16 minutes ago, Marlayne said:

...it's the nutrients in salmon that we're looking for. 

They have extra protein at Costco.

 

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Omega-3 by fish type....

Type of fish Total omega-3 content per 3.5 ounces (grams)
Mackerel 2.6
Trout, lake 2.0
Herring 1.7
Tuna, bluefin 1.6
Salmon 1.5
Sardines, canned 1.5
Sturgeon, Atlantic 1.5
Tuna, albacore 1.5
Whitefish, lake 1.5
Anchovies 1.4
Bluefish 1.2
Bass, striped 0.8
Trout, brook 0.6
Trout, rainbow 0.6
Halibut, Pacific 0.5
Pollock 0.5
Shark 0.5
Sturgeon 0.4
Bass, fresh water 0.3
Catfish 0.3
Ocean perch 0.3
Flounder 0.2
Haddock 0.2
Snapper, red 0.2
Swordfish 0.2
Sole 0.1

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Depends on what type of salmon. Pink salmon can be caught or netted in the wild, but they are inferior in flavor and texture to Sockeye. Most, if not all, farmed salmon is Atlantic. The best tasting salmon is White Spring salmon, also called Chinook or the northern monsters - Tyee. They are only rarely seen in fish stores, they are mostly a trophy gamefish. Another runner up is Kokanee trout - which is a Sockeye salmon adapted to live full time in freshwater. Yep, worms in fish are a problem, they are usually spotted by the processors who use a light table. As a boy, growing up in Northern B.C., there were many small lakes which became loaded with rainbow trout, they were so ravenous they could be caught with a piece of tin foil, and you could easily walk away with 50 to 100 trout. Then they became wormy, and population culled, to start all over again next year.

You might consider ordering some high quality fish oil supplements which I am sure are available locally or imported.

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Not much in the world goes together better than a Kokanee catch and a Kokanee Lager.

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Many people do not know that Puerto Vallarta was once a major supplier of shark liver oil. They had a contract with the U.S. Navy during WWII .

They were Dogfish livers, but no mind.

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If you stick to wild salmon, go and see where you can find Alaskan, Canadian, Russian salmon at stores.
All salmon from Norway or Chile are farm raized!
The difference between wild and farm raised salmon are:
  Wild taste much much better and expensive.
  Nutrition wise as per one of my friends who works in salmon farms in Chile, farm raised one got more fat but
  rest are basically the same. 
 However farm raised salmon get overfeeded such as maiz, pork, chiken, antibiotics, artificial vitamins and colorants.
 In fact in 2013 Norwegian government warned pregnant women not to take farm raised salmon more than twice a week.

I do not know how you would cook salmon but if you prepare sashimi or sushi, salmon should be defrosted beforehand.
As sometimes wild salmon have parasites(anisakis) as shown in the pic presented by AngusMactavish.  If you cook, grill, or boil they will be dead and safe.
Besides freezing I always use small black light to check fish. 

 

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Michael ...Most of my restaurants in Florida were fish orientated , I eat fish at least three times a week ...I can easily tell  how recently the fish was caught and without a doubt I have the best  luck at  Costa Allegre  in the super lake plaza area ,but one does have to be adaptable. Every couple of weeks or so l even manage to get  sushi grade yellow fin tuna ! 

 

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On 6/16/2018 at 4:57 AM, Ukiyo said:

If you stick to wild salmon, go and see where you can find Alaskan, Canadian, Russian salmon at stores.
All salmon from Norway or Chile are farm raized!

Ukiyo, we just don't have that kind of access here.

I find Pacifico on the west end usually has a bigger selection.

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