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Curmudgeon

Lawyer for U.S. Wills

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I wonder if there is an internet service that provides that. I know a few years ago I downloaded a will format that covered most of what I needed

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Be wary as Mexican wills are registered and some prepare US wills and dont give you all copies or originals and then can change them out when you die and your heirs get nothing.  Mexican wills can be used in the US.

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23 hours ago, Intercasa said:

Be wary as Mexican wills are registered and some prepare US wills and dont give you all copies or originals and then can change them out when you die and your heirs get nothing.  Mexican wills can be used in the US.

I'm not sure I understand that, Spencer. If I only sign one copy and keep it (original), how can anyone do damage, even if they have copies?

I have a Mexican will relating to assets in Mexico, and a US will relating to assets in the US. Is this not the right approach?

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Curmudgeon, I have the same as you, a Mexican Will for my Mexican assets and a US Will for my US assets. I did use a Notario here in Mexico, where a copy of my will is retained. Because it is registered, it cannot be compromised. I think what Spencer was pointing out is that US Wills cannot be registered as US Wills, in Mexico, and if an unscrupulous preparer here. alters a US Will, it could create problems.

I scan my stuff because I have one of those $80 color inkjet printers with a scanner (you know the kind that Gringos use to scan their driver's license in color and get popped for attempted forgery) <g> and send pdf versions to my attorney in the US -- of my Mexican and US documents.

I often include the EDT Notice below. which can be modified for your particular needs:

 

 

EDT (Electronic document transmissions) shall be deemed valid and enforceable in respect of any provisions of this Contract. As applicable, this agreement shall be Incorporate U.S. Public Law 106-229, ‘‘Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act’’ or such other applicable law conforming to the UNCITRAL Model Law on Electronic Signatures (2001) and ELECTRONIC COMMERCE AGREEMENT (ECE/TRADE/257, Geneva, May 2000) adopted by the United Nations Centre for Trade Facilitation and Electronic Business (UN/CEFACT). EDT documents shall be subject to European Community Directive No. 95/46/EEC, as applicable. Either Party may request hard copy of any document that has been previously transmitted by electronic means provided however, that any such request shall in no manner delay the parties from performing their respective obligations and duties under EDT instruments.

 

 

 

 

 

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On 6/7/2018 at 11:20 AM, Aquaponicsman said:

an unscrupulous preparer here. alters a US Will, it could create problems.

Thanks for your great reply. However I'm still intrigued as to how my US will could be altered if I have the only original signed copy. 

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Many people sign many copies and dont know it, others are given a copy marked "copy", others are told best if the attorney hold the will.  Best practice is to always fully sign and date every page of every document you sign to avoid replacing pages or trying to use pages from another document.  also give copies to trusted family members so they know what should be in it.

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I can't recommend a US attorney to prepare a will.  However, I will give you very cheap options for accomplishing this important task.

  First, sign up for Prepaid Legal Services.  The law firm at that time was Ross and Matthews.  Do a search on line and you will find it.    It is very inexpensive and they will do a will once a year at no extra charge. A lawyer does it for you through this service.  This is how we made our very first will, then prepaid told us how to make changes any time we wanted.  It was so simple. 

Second option, you can prepare your own will.  Just get a sample on line, then you just get it notarized. 

I am amending these comments.  I just looked it up.  It is now called Legal Shield.

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On 6/9/2018 at 10:21 AM, Curmudgeon said:

how my US will could be altered if I have the only original signed copy.  

My question is, how will anybody find your "only signed copy" as they step over your dead body -- find it in your secret hiding place (if they can) -- and modify it?

Copies you send to others are not legal documents. Yes, they go to show possible intent, but are not valid.

I do not believe any reputable US lawyer would participate is such ineffective representation.

He could possibly be liable for participating in such folly -- knowing your intentions.

Wills are difficult to deal with personally, because you are addressing your own mortality.

And, probate court is where you would find out the true nature of people you would wish you had left out of your will.

My wills are not secret and my Mexican Will is registered here (and it makes reference to my US Will and visa versa -- as the only two legal documents pertaining to my will) and my US will is registered with my attorney in the USA, who has a legal and fiduciary obligation to maintain the integrity and intent of that will... and is under seal. (Which is a legal option) to prevent the greedy heirs from finding out how much they want to spend on holiday gifts for me. <g> 

 

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On 6/9/2018 at 11:21 AM, Curmudgeon said:

Thanks for your great reply. However I'm still intrigued as to how my US will could be altered if I have the only original signed copy. 

Signatures can be forged easily enough. Remember, your signature isn't a rubber stamp. There are little variations each time you sign, and over a period of years, a signature could well vary. Also if no one knows there's another copy, then they don't have any reason to believe that a false will with a forged signature is false. IMHO (and I'm not a lawyer), you really need to have someone who will survive you have a copy of the will, and for that person to have some idea of what the will says. That way there's someone who is capable of spotting a false will, and who will have the proof to back it up. 

Just my two cents, but that's how I'd view the situation. 

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