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2 hours ago, utilitus said:

Just as above, in an ideal situation where capacious buried conduits to each home were built into a well designed Frac, iLox should have no objection to providing a wired node or two to the gate of a Frac, and the denizens of that neighborhood could then contract elsewhere for a router box and to run the internal wired connections, which needn't be fiber (though, as they say, it wouldn't hurt). Telecom gear at that level is rather generic, and can be surprisingly cheap. One Gig is 50 x 20 Mb.  Someone Frac-side would have to administer billing and eventually repairs, etc.  If enough Fracs were able to follow this pattern, they could cooperate, standardize, buy wholesale, etc.  I'll donate the domain name LakeLux.org in the unlikely event such a scenario is plausible.

You guys are thinking of the wrong country, I must say.

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CG, you know whereof you speak, but that's kind of the point...  Where there is an opportunity to design, build and own what is and will be a fundamental facility for decades, it could make sense to try to intelligently engineer decent standards and outcomes in that part of the environment where such control is possible.  

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I just read this on Cord Cutters Daily, a good explanation of 5G. I have thought for some time that Slim has decided to just skip the "fiber generation" thing and will jump right to this solution to crush any competition. I realize that is quite a leap of faith!

In 2018, 5G home internet will start rolling out in the United States. Google, Charter, Dish, Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, and others are planning on launching 5G internet. Dish, Verizon, and AT&T are spending billions to get ready for 5G.

So what is 5G, and why should cord cutters care? We answer your questions.

What is 5G internet?

The easiest way to explain 5G is that it is fiber internet without the need to run a wire to your house. Fiber internet is great, but it’s a slow and expensive process to roll out nationwide. Also, as Google has learned, current ISPs can slow down any attempt to build out a fiber network by slowing access to poles for example.

Now, 5G internet offers the same speed but can be rolled out in a fraction of the time as traditional fiber. It also removes many of the pole requirements preventing current ISPs attempts to slow down the roll out.

The idea is to upgrade existing cellphone towers with the new 5G system. Although 5G does not have the same range as the current system, providers plan to use new small towers on top of light poles, power poles, and other similar existing structures.

Why is 5G important?

Home internet has traditionally been dominated by DSL and cable. This means most Americans typically have two options for broadband internet. With 5G you may soon have five or six options.

This is also great news for rural Americans in areas that it may not be financially sound to run fiber miles between each home. They can set up a 5G cell tower and cover rural America at a fraction of the cost of updating DSL or running cables.

This will, for the first time, bring real competition to the world of home internet helping to drive down prices and add new features, which will also help cord cutters fully break free from phone and cable companies.

Will 5G suffer the same limitations as 4G?

Many have posted their concern that 5G will have the say limitations as 4G, but according to industry insiders, it won’t.

5G is being built for home internet first. Verizon is spending a billion dollars to run new fiber lines to their towers to handle the new traffic. 5G is also built to better handle internet usage and support more devices than 4G was built for.

Not only will 5G handle more devices, but also 5G will offer far faster speeds than current 4G standards.

Wireless executives have also made it clear that 5G is being built for the purpose of taking on cable and DSL in your home. Sources say that you should look for 5G to be competitive with your home internet provider.

Of course, as more providers launch, the prices and packages will likely become more aggressive.

What is the next step with 5G?

Later this year Verizon, T-Mobile, and AT&T are all launching 5G networks. We are still looking at a 2020 date for most Americans but a few lucky ones may have 5G internet in their town by the end of this year. In 2019 the roll out of 5G will greatly speed up.

As we write this companies including AT&T have live 5G tests going on to see how 5G will work in the wild. So far all reports say testing is going well.

Hopefully, in the next few months, we will start to learn what markets will get 5G first.

Cord Cutting Will Be The Real WInner

Soon there will be for the first time real competition amoung home internet services. Instead of having two maybe 3 options to pick from you will have 5 or more services to pick from. That will drive a new flood of cord cutting without the need to keep internet from your local phone or cable company. Finally the true cord cutting dream is almost here.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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42 minutes ago, utilitus said:

CG, you know whereof you speak, but that's kind of the point...  Where there is an opportunity to design, build and own what is and will be a fundamental facility for decades, it could make sense to try to intelligently engineer decent standards and outcomes in that part of the environment where such control is possible.  

Yes, it would be great... but having something like that happen here? Fuggedaboudit.

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It would only be great if the connection is unmonitored, without download limitations. If the charges for 5G are like current cellular plans, with rather limited download capacity, it would be cost prohibitive as a replacement for current unlimited fiber and DSL plans. 

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Some other benefits to Ilox:

The "middle" cost plan will provide a VOIP phone line. That would eliminate my Vonage cost ($8160p per year). I would also save some money by dropping TelMex internet and just have the local phone service ($2400 +/- per year). Those two savings TOTALLY covers the cost of Ilox. 

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I have signed up and paid for iLox but I won't be getting rid of any of my "back ups". I've had Vonage for over 15 years and my cost is around 4,000 pesos a year (22 Canadian a month). I will keep it because it's how the kids call ME for FREE since the number is a Toronto number. Back ups... ya gotta have back ups!

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I believe the triple package allows for 2 phone lines, the 2nd being either an MX, USA or CN #

https://www.ilox.mx/iloxhogar/index.php/paquetes/14-servicios/68-triples2

For me, the $1209 MX/month package gives me 300 Mbps instead of less than 5 and without being offline almost 50% of the time plus that 2nd line. The phone service will be about the same as will be the Ilox TV compared to  the Dish MX I presently have for my MX family.

My increase cost would be $210 MX/month.

Based on my Expedia cable service NOB, on which I get a price break because it is in every apartment in the condo building, I couldn't get 100 Mbps for t$60 USD per month.

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4 hours ago, pappysmarket said:

I just read this on Cord Cutters Daily, a good explanation of 5G. I have thought for some time that Slim has decided to just skip the "fiber generation" thing and will jump right to this solution to crush any competition. I realize that is quite a leap of faith!

In 2018, 5G home internet will start rolling out in the United States. Google, Charter, Dish, Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, and others are planning on launching 5G internet. Dish, Verizon, and AT&T are spending billions to get ready for 5G.

So what is 5G, and why should cord cutters care? We answer your questions.

What is 5G internet?

The easiest way to explain 5G is that it is fiber internet without the need to run a wire to your house. Fiber internet is great, but it’s a slow and expensive process to roll out nationwide. Also, as Google has learned, current ISPs can slow down any attempt to build out a fiber network by slowing access to poles for example.

Now, 5G internet offers the same speed but can be rolled out in a fraction of the time as traditional fiber. It also removes many of the pole requirements preventing current ISPs attempts to slow down the roll out.

The idea is to upgrade existing cellphone towers with the new 5G system. Although 5G does not have the same range as the current system, providers plan to use new small towers on top of light poles, power poles, and other similar existing structures.

Why is 5G important?

Home internet has traditionally been dominated by DSL and cable. This means most Americans typically have two options for broadband internet. With 5G you may soon have five or six options.

This is also great news for rural Americans in areas that it may not be financially sound to run fiber miles between each home. They can set up a 5G cell tower and cover rural America at a fraction of the cost of updating DSL or running cables.

This will, for the first time, bring real competition to the world of home internet helping to drive down prices and add new features, which will also help cord cutters fully break free from phone and cable companies.

Will 5G suffer the same limitations as 4G?

Many have posted their concern that 5G will have the say limitations as 4G, but according to industry insiders, it won’t.

5G is being built for home internet first. Verizon is spending a billion dollars to run new fiber lines to their towers to handle the new traffic. 5G is also built to better handle internet usage and support more devices than 4G was built for.

Not only will 5G handle more devices, but also 5G will offer far faster speeds than current 4G standards.

Wireless executives have also made it clear that 5G is being built for the purpose of taking on cable and DSL in your home. Sources say that you should look for 5G to be competitive with your home internet provider.

Of course, as more providers launch, the prices and packages will likely become more aggressive.

What is the next step with 5G?

Later this year Verizon, T-Mobile, and AT&T are all launching 5G networks. We are still looking at a 2020 date for most Americans but a few lucky ones may have 5G internet in their town by the end of this year. In 2019 the roll out of 5G will greatly speed up.

As we write this companies including AT&T have live 5G tests going on to see how 5G will work in the wild. So far all reports say testing is going well.

Hopefully, in the next few months, we will start to learn what markets will get 5G first.

Cord Cutting Will Be The Real WInner

Soon there will be for the first time real competition amoung home internet services. Instead of having two maybe 3 options to pick from you will have 5 or more services to pick from. That will drive a new flood of cord cutting without the need to keep internet from your local phone or cable company. Finally the true cord cutting dream is almost here.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

Good information. Thanks. I saw Telmex fiber optic trucks in Jaltepec near my Nursing home so I stopped thinking they could run cable to my home. The technicians told me the fiber optic was for the cell towers not home use. So maybe you right Slim is getting ready for 5G.  

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What if a gated community provided the conduits through which electrical and telmex and cable lines already run? Where does it  say that Telmex provided their own conduits and can, therefore, "rent" them out... or not?

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As I previously posted, Ilox will not share another utility's conduit. It was stated that this is the policy to avoid finger pointing in case of problems inside the conduit. 

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That makes total sense. Some of those conduits are downright GROTTY and should be put on somebody's list with regards to preventive maintenance. I guess it's kinda like the top of the fridge... if you can't easily see it, it doesn't get cleaned.

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Tom's and Ferret's points above are key, but if Fracs and perhaps others could use the 'wholesale distributor' model (which seems to have been posed by iLox only in terms of wireless, AFAIK, which could be an appropriate solution in many cases), any serviceable topology used by the second tier 'distributor' into neighborhoods shouldn't effect iLox, unless they manage QoS closely (a good thing), or esoteric telecom regulations apply.  The important question would seem to be if the cleared 'distributor' model could apply to Fracs, and other subscriber rich neighborhoods.  Again, I think coordination and standardization among blocks of customers is an important idea, but iLox may have that covered already.

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Regarding Ferret's "backups" comment.....  I for one would keep some kind of backup (cellphone/data?) until well after the 'system' is installed and running smoothly. I understand that iLox plans on opening an office Lakeside, with English speaking personnel, when the project is a 'go'. Hopefully there will also be maintenance/repair personnel available on quick notice. It only takes one big truck with a load of bricks going off the carretera  snapping a CFE pole that carries the main fiber line and, voila, 300+ clients with no Internet, phone nor TV.  Fiber strands do NOT get fixed as easily as copper and that can only happen after CFE gets a new pole installed.  Just saying.....

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On 6/7/2018 at 11:41 AM, tomgates said:

Some other benefits to Ilox:

The "middle" cost plan will provide a VOIP phone line. That would eliminate my Vonage cost ($8160p per year). I would also save some money by dropping TelMex internet and just have the local phone service ($2400 +/- per year). Those two savings TOTALLY covers the cost of Ilox. 

I am thrilled with the clarity and ease of use of OOMA. Around 10 a month depending on what state you say you live in. I chose Texas because of my mailing addressI did not buy their phone. Porting my US phone line from Verizon to OOma was 40 but they gave it to me for free.

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Yes we have been very happy with our Ooma for a little over a year. I didn't think anyone still paid for  Vonage. We dropped them 8 years ago and used something half the price until we found Ooma.

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Has anyone mentioned that ilox will be using CFE poles from Joco to  here, not underground conduit.  Thus, it's vulnerable, and Lyle admitted that vulnerability in a reply to a question from one of the audience members.  I don't think most people heard that. That would not keep me from signing up, but the fact that I'm a renter in a gated community that thought they could run lines above ground on existing walls does discourage me.  The homeowners own those walls, and not everyone thinks that's an okay thing to do.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I own a condo in Riberas Del Chante, a gated fracc just outside of Jocotepec almost directly across the carreterra from Las Fuentes. Currently we do not have TelMex service and I am wondering if we will be able to receive Ilox's service?

I'm happy to pay the money up front as I see the value in Ilox's service but I won't pay until I know with certainty that I will be eligible for the service in my Fracc. Most of my neighbors just visit their condos on vacation and probably would not contribute for Ilox's service much less vote to install underground conduit (if necessary?).

Can anyone confirm whether or not my Fracc will be able to receive their service? Or put me in contact with an Ilox rep that I can speak to about my Fracc? I'm not clear on the requirement for underground conduit as I have read some say it is necessary in a gated fracc and other's say the service will run CFE's Poles not underground conduit.

I really appreciate any clarification or contact info to an Ilox rep who can assist.

Thank you!

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I am not a/the authority but....  I have seen no other words, in all the Posts about this fiber service, than that they will NOT go into a gated community unless there is access to the inside with NO OTHER utility involved. Sounds like you don’t meet their requirements. Also, as far as I have read no one has seen/been in contact with any iLox representatives other than ‘Tom’.  Even at the recent meeting in Ajijic they did NOT have anyone there. Maybe Tom will answer also.

 

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