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It's the time of year when the shelters are receiving an increase in requests to take abandoned dogs and puppies.  As a result, we are usually perpetually full.  To compound things, many of our volunteers are snowbirds and leave this time of year to go north, so we are usually understaffed.  We receive several requests daily and we simply cannot accommodate them all.  If we refuse to take a dog you've rescued, please try to understand it is for good reason.  Overcrowding is not good for the safety or health of the dogs.  In addition, it can cause disease and (worse yet) result in the need to quarantine.  If that happens, it is not only bad for the shelter under quarantine, but hurts all the shelters and rescuers in the area.

If you choose to rescue a dog, you should consider that dog now belongs to you until you are able to rehome it on your own, or are fortunate enough that a spot opens at a shelter.  I assure you that it is at least as difficult for us to refuse your rescue as it is for you to hear that from us.  If you are heading NOB soon, it's probably not a good idea to rescue a dog that you can't take with you.  Thank you all for your understanding.

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Who do you represent, please?

 

Hey sad face. the OP said, "If we refuse...". I would like to know who we are?

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3 hours ago, AngusMactavish said:

Who do you represent, please?

 

Hey sad face. the OP said, "If we refuse...". I would like to know who we are?

I does not matter in the least who "we" are.  Same story every year around here regardless of which shelter.  People leave and either dump the pet they "adopted" in the fall, or simply think they can turn it in like "rent-a-pet".  Believe me I know this from many years of direct experience with these ignorant and heartless slobs.

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I am just surprised that there is a unified voice for all the shelters. I also find it hard to believe.

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I work at Lucky Dog.  But the lakeside shelters all experience this every year and lament how sad it is that we cannot do more.  My words are my own, but I would be surprised if any lakeside shelters would argue that they are not true.

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It's not hard to believe in "a unified voice" if you have ever volunteered at an animal shelter.  It doesn't take very long to see the pattern which is more concentrated at this time of year but carries on throughout the year.  The species may vary but the back stories are the same.  We even had someone adopt a dog so their kids would have a dog for the month they were visiting.  Did they mention this little detail when taking the dog?  Of course not.  The dog was promptly returned when the kids left.  Unfortunately there is just no end to the callous behaviour of some people.

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Maybe it would be easier to believe in the unified voice if you imagine what the desenting voice would be saying.

”The shelters receive no increase in requests to take abandoned dogs and puppies in this time of year.  We are seldom full so bring them all in. We have no snowbird volunteers so no one ever goes north, and we are never understaffed. We don’t receive nearly enough requests and have no problem accommodating anyone at any time. We have no good reasons to refuse to take a dog you've rescued. Overcrowding is never a problem. The more the merrier. No matter how we pack them in, all the dogs remain safe and happy. Quarantines are fun for everyone. It’s good for all the shelters and rescuers in the area!  You can choose to rescue a dog secure in the knowledge that we are here to take it off your hands. You get the glory of boasting on Facebook how you rescued a dog and we do all the work for you!  No matter if you are heading NOB soon, “rescue” that cute dog walking past your house even if you won’t be able to take the dog with you.  We are here to take your problems off your hands.  Glad we got that cleared up.”

 

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THANKS!!! To the comments, as a volunteer at The Ranch, I would just say amen sisters. We all speak with one voice because we are all in this together. We work as a loose-knit team, and try to complement each other. And this is the absolute worse time of year, every year. I would just add if you can't find a home for your "rescue" puppy or dog, please consider taking the dog with you when you return NOB and finding a home for it there. Many shelters NOB as much less crowded than we are here. Plus a purebred MSD (Mexican Street Dog) is much less common.

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10 hours ago, MtnMama said:

THANKS!!! To the comments, as a volunteer at The Ranch, I would just say amen sisters. We all speak with one voice because we are all in this together. We work as a loose-knit team, and try to complement each other. And this is the absolute worse time of year, every year. I would just add if you can't find a home for your "rescue" puppy or dog, please consider taking the dog with you when you return NOB and finding a home for it there. Many shelters NOB as much less crowded than we are here. Plus a purebred MSD (Mexican Street Dog) is much less common.

Thank YOU MtnMama.  We appreciate the support of our fellow shelters.  You guys do an amazing job and we are so fortunate to have the Ranch here Lakeside.

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Don't use this thread to belittle the organizations which have saved so many animals.  Do you really think that they would be able to accomplish what they have without being organized.  The Spay and Neuter programs alone, are a very involved effort. 

When someone takes an animal off the street, it should not be to dump later.

Dogs are left standing in front of homes, where they once lived, and skittish on the streets after experiencing care.  It shatters them emotionally, for as with the foster I took in, the vets will stated "This is not a street dog.  This dog had a home before it was abandoned, likely due to becoming pregnant or it's owner abandoned her.  This dog was so dehydrated it surely would not have lived."  We had found this dog collapsed due to lack of food, on the street.  

Point blank many who were homed and abandoned, do not have street skills.   They are terrified after being released.  Some won't even try to survive, but lay down in the heat and give up.

Thank you for all you do, every last person and animal rescue organization here.

If anyone would like to help, but cannot do a life commitment to a pet, there are many ways to reach out.

Donations, fostering and accompanying a dog as a flight angel to their new home NOB. 

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The message I got from the OP is that if you truly rescue an animal, don't bring it to a shelter. It is your burden and if you can't keep it in your forever care, leave it to die.

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(EDITED BY MOD TO REMOVE PERSONAL COMMENT)

 If we are not able to take an animal at the shelter due to lack of room we are always able to offer alternative suggestions in an effort to try to help the person deal with the situation.  We don't just slam the door shut and say your problem!  We do try to help the people and the dog.  Shelter people are compassionate, dedicated, caring people, something I'm not sure you would know much about.  

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On 3/29/2018 at 5:14 PM, maggiesmom said:

 If we are not able to take an animal at the shelter due to lack of room we are always able to offer alternative suggestions in an effort to try to help the person deal with the situation.  We don't just slam the door shut and say your problem!  We do try to help the people and the dog.  Shelter people are compassionate, dedicated, caring people, something I'm not sure you would know much about.  

EDITED BY MOD TO REMOVE PERSONAL COMMENT

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We who spend a significant portion of our lives volunteering at animal shelters and spay neuter clinics will try to explain it to you slowly.

First, we ask if you rescue a dog, have a plan for what you are going to do. If the dog is healthy and has street smarts, leave it alone. It does not need to be "rescued".  You can leave out food and water if you like.

Second, make sure the dog is not already owned by someone else who just doesn't care for it the way you might. In other words, don't steal other people's dogs.

Remember there is an agency to rescue animals from dangerous situations and they do a very good job. See the article pinned at the top of this section :  REPORT LAKESIDE ANIMAL ABUSE

If the dog is in crisis, by all means try to help it, but do so with a plan. Contact the local shelters, or your Vet WHEN you rescue the dog and work with them. For example, if the dog has not yet had the puppies, see if it is too late for an abortion. We really don't need more puppies if they can be prevented. If you don't plan to keep the dog, work hard to find it a good home. Don't wait until 2 weeks before you are going NOB and try to make your responsibility our responsibility. Shelters have a finite amount of space and are only able to safely care for a certain number. The closing of Anita's Animals has added to the problem since she took in and placed so many dogs and cats.

 

 

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On 3/29/2018 at 3:37 PM, AngusMactavish said:

The message I got from the OP is that if you truly rescue an animal, don't bring it to a shelter. It is your burden and if you can't keep it in your forever care, leave it to die.

You got the wrong message. 

EDITED BY MOD TO END THE PERSONAL BACK AND FORTH.  MODERATOR AGREES THIS IS NOT THE MESSAGE OF THIS THREAD AS EXPLAINED BY A NUMBER OF ACTUALLY INVOLVED RESCUE VOLUNTEERS.

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Let's knock off the backbiting and discuss the topic.  Animal rescue in this area is a huge, almost overwhelming, problem.  That the volunteers save so many is truly remarkable and we all should thank them for it.

I've edited this thread in response to complaints received and deleted the truly off topic and personally unpleasant stuff.

 

 

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